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A Topology of Everyday Constellations (Writing Architecture)

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A Topology of Everyday Constellations (Writing Architecture) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Today, spaces no longer represent a bourgeois haven; nor are they the sites of a classical harmony between work and leisure, private and public, the local and the global. The house is not merely a home but a position for negotiations with multiple spheres — the technological as well as the physical and the psychological. In andlt;Iandgt;A Topology of Everyday Constellationsandlt;/Iandgt;, Georges Teyssot considers the intrusion of the public sphere into private space, and the blurring of notions of interior, privacy, and intimacy in our societies. He proposes that we rethink design in terms of a new definition of the practices of everyday life. andlt;/Pandgt;andlt;Pandgt;Teyssot considers the door, the window, the mirror, and the screen as thresholds or interstitial spaces that divide the world in two: the outside and the inside. Thresholds, he suggests, work both as markers of boundaries and as bridges to the exterior. The stark choice between boundary and bridge creates a middle space, an in-between that holds the possibility of exchanges and encounters. andlt;/Pandgt;andlt;Pandgt;If the threshold no longer separates public from private, and if we can no longer think of the house as a bastion of privacy, Teyssot asks, does the body still inhabit the house — or does the house, evolving into a series of microdevices, inhabit the body? andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Today, spaces no longer represent a bourgeois haven; nor are they the sites of a classical harmony between work and leisure, private and public, the local and the global. The house is not merely a home but a position for negotiations with multiple spheres — the technological as well as the physical and the psychological. In A Topology of Everyday Constellations, Georges Teyssot considers the intrusion of the public sphere into private space, and the blurring of notions of interior, privacy, and intimacy in our societies. He proposes that we rethink design in terms of a new definition of the practices of everyday life.

Teyssot considers the door, the window, the mirror, and the screen as thresholds or interstitial spaces that divide the world in two: the outside and the inside. Thresholds, he suggests, work both as markers of boundaries and as bridges to the exterior. The stark choice between boundary and bridge creates a middle space, an in-between that holds the possibility of exchanges and encounters.

If the threshold no longer separates public from private, and if we can no longer think of the house as a bastion of privacy, Teyssot asks, does the body still inhabit the house — or does the house, evolving into a series of microdevices, inhabit the body?

About the Author

Georges Teyssot, Professor in the School of Architecture at Laval University, Quebec, has taught the history and theory of architecture at the Istituto Universitario di Architettura of Venice, Princeton University's School of Architecture, and the Department of Architecture at ETH Zurich. He is the author or editor of many books, including Interior Landscapes and The American Lawn.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262518321
Author:
Teyssot, Georges
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Criticism
Subject:
Architecture-Urban Planning
Subject:
ARCHITECTURE / Reference
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Writing Architecture A Topology of Everyday Constellations
Publication Date:
20130222
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
89 band#38;w illus.
Pages:
360
Dimensions:
8 x 5.375 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » General
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » History » Contemporary (1945-)
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Reference
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Urban Planning
Humanities » Philosophy » General

A Topology of Everyday Constellations (Writing Architecture) New Trade Paper
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Product details 360 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262518321 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Today, spaces no longer represent a bourgeois haven; nor are they the sites of a classical harmony between work and leisure, private and public, the local and the global. The house is not merely a home but a position for negotiations with multiple spheres — the technological as well as the physical and the psychological. In A Topology of Everyday Constellations, Georges Teyssot considers the intrusion of the public sphere into private space, and the blurring of notions of interior, privacy, and intimacy in our societies. He proposes that we rethink design in terms of a new definition of the practices of everyday life.

Teyssot considers the door, the window, the mirror, and the screen as thresholds or interstitial spaces that divide the world in two: the outside and the inside. Thresholds, he suggests, work both as markers of boundaries and as bridges to the exterior. The stark choice between boundary and bridge creates a middle space, an in-between that holds the possibility of exchanges and encounters.

If the threshold no longer separates public from private, and if we can no longer think of the house as a bastion of privacy, Teyssot asks, does the body still inhabit the house — or does the house, evolving into a series of microdevices, inhabit the body?

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