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Consuming Power: A Social History of American Energies

by

Consuming Power: A Social History of American Energies Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

How did the United States become the world's largest consumer of energy? David Nye shows that this is less a question about the development of technology than it is a question about the development of culture. In Consuming Power Nye uses energy as a touchstone to examine the lives of ordinary people engaged in normal activities. He looks at how these activities changed as new energy systems were constructed, from colonial times to recent years. He also shows how, as Americans incorporated new machines and processes into their lives, they became ensnared in power systems that were not easily changed: they made choices about the conduct of their lives, and those choices accumulated to produce a consuming culture.Nye examines a sequence of large systems that acquired and then lost technological momentum over the course of American history, including water power, steam power, electricity, the internal-combustion engine, atomic power, and computerization. He shows how each system became part of a larger set of social constructions through its links to the home, the factory, and the city. The result is a social history of America as seen through the lens of energy consumption.

Synopsis:

Nye uses energy as a touchstone to examine the lives of ordinary people engaged in normal activities.

Synopsis:

How did the United States become the world's largest consumer of energy? David Nye shows that this is less a question about the development of technology than it is a question about the development of culture. In

Synopsis:

Nye examines a sequence of large systems that acquired and then lost technological momentum over the course of American history, including water power, steam power, electricity, the internal-combustion engine, atomic power, and computerization. He shows how each system became part of a larger set of social constructions through its links to the home, the factory, and the city. The result is a social history of America as seen through the lens of energy consumption.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [265]-323) and index.

About the Author

David E. Nye is Professor of American Studies and History at the Center for American Studies, Odense University - SDU.

Nye was recently awarded the 2005 Leonardo Da Vinci Medal presented by the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT). The medal is the highest recognition from the Society for the History of Technology and is presented to an individual who has made an outstanding contribution to the history of technology, through research, teaching, publications, and other activities.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262640381
Author:
Nye, David E.
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Author:
Schiffer, Michael Brian
Location:
Cambridge, Mass. :
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Power Resources
Subject:
Philosophy & Social Aspects
Subject:
Energy consumption
Subject:
Aspects
Subject:
Science Reference-Philosophy of Science
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Consuming Power
Publication Date:
19990231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Urban Planning
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » US History » General
Reference » Science Reference » Philosophy of Science
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

Consuming Power: A Social History of American Energies New Trade Paper
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$37.25 In Stock
Product details 352 pages MIT Press - English 9780262640381 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Nye uses energy as a touchstone to examine the lives of ordinary people engaged in normal activities.
"Synopsis" by , How did the United States become the world's largest consumer of energy? David Nye shows that this is less a question about the development of technology than it is a question about the development of culture. In
"Synopsis" by , Nye examines a sequence of large systems that acquired and then lost technological momentum over the course of American history, including water power, steam power, electricity, the internal-combustion engine, atomic power, and computerization. He shows how each system became part of a larger set of social constructions through its links to the home, the factory, and the city. The result is a social history of America as seen through the lens of energy consumption.
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