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Scattered: The Forced Relocation of Poland's Ukrainians After World War II

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Scattered: The Forced Relocation of Poland's Ukrainians After World War II Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One of twelve children in a close-knit, affluent Catholic Belgian family, Jan Vansina began life in a seemingly sheltered environment. But that cocoon was soon pierced by the escalating tensions and violence that gripped Europe in the 1930s and 1940s. In this book Vansina recalls his boyhood and youth in Antwerp, Bruges, and the Flemish countryside as the country was rocked by waves of economic depression, fascism, competing nationalisms, and the occupation of first Axis and then Allied forces.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Within the vast literature on World War II, a much smaller body of work treats the everyday experiences of civilians, particularly in smaller countries drawn into the conflict. Recalling the war in Belgium from a childand#8217;s-eye perspective, Vansina describes pangs of hunger so great as to make him crave the bitter taste of cod-liver oil. He vividly remembers the shock of seeing severely wounded men on the grounds of a field hospital, the dangers of crossing fields and swimming in ponds strafed by planes, and his familyand#8217;s interactions with occupying and escaping soldiers from both sides. After the war he recalls emerging numb from the cinema where he first saw the footage of the Nazi death camps, and he describes a new phase of unrest marked by looting, vigilante justice, and the countryand#8217;s efforts at reunification.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Vansina, a historian and anthropologist best known for his insights into oral tradition and social memory, draws on his own memories and those of his siblings to reconstruct daily life in Belgium during a tumultuous era.

Synopsis:

Following World War II, the communist government of Poland forcibly relocated the country's Ukrainian minority by means of a Soviet-Polish population exchange and then a secretly planned action code-named Operation Vistula. In Scattered, Diana Howansky Reilly recounts these events through the experiences of three siblings caught up in the conflict, during a turbulent period when compulsory resettlement was a common political tactic used against national minorities to create homogenous states.

and#160;and#160; and#160;Born in the Lemko region of southeastern Poland, Petro, Melania, and Hania Pyrtej survived World War II only to be separated by political decisions over which they had no control. Petro relocated with his wife to Soviet Ukraine during the population exchange of 1944andndash;46, while his sisters Melania and Hania were resettled to western Poland through Operation Vistula in 1947. As the Ukrainian Insurgent Army fought resettlement, the Polish government meanwhile imprisoned suspected sympathizers within the Jaworzno concentration camp. Melania, Reilly's maternal grandmother, eventually found her way to the United States during Poland's period of liberalization in the 1960s.

and#160;and#160; and#160;Drawing on oral interviews and archival research, Reilly tells a fascinating, true story that provides a bottom-up perspective and illustrates the impact of extraordinary historical events on the lives of ordinary people. Tracing the story to the present, she describes survivors' efforts to receive compensation for the destruction of their homes and communities.

Synopsis:

Vansina, a historian and anthropologist best known for his insights into oral tradition and social memory, draws on his own memories and those of his siblings to reconstruct daily life in Belgium during World War II.

Synopsis:

The 1992andndash;95 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina following the dissolution of socialist Yugoslavia became notorious for andldquo;ethnic cleansingandrdquo; and mass rapes targeting the Bosniac (Bosnian Muslim) population. Postwar social and political processes have continued to be dominated by competing nationalisms representing Bosniacs, Serbs, and Croats, as well as those supporting a multiethnic Bosnian state, in which narratives of victimhood take center stage, often in gendered form. Elissa Helms shows that in the aftermath of the war, initiatives by and for Bosnian women perpetuated and complicated dominant images of women as victims and peacemakers in a conflict and political system led by men. In a sober corrective to such accounts, she offers a critical look at the politics of womenandrsquo;s activism and gendered nationalism in a postwar and postsocialist society.
and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Drawing on ethnographic research spanning fifteen years, Innocence and Victimhood demonstrates how womenandrsquo;s activists and NGOs responded to, challenged, and often reinforced essentialist images in affirmative ways, utilizing the moral purity associated with the position of victimhood to bolster social claims, shape political visions, pursue foreign funding, and wage campaigns for postwar justice. Deeply sensitive to the suffering at the heart of Bosnian womenandrsquo;s (and menandrsquo;s) wartime experiences, this book also reveals the limitations to strategies that emphasize innocence and victimhood.

Synopsis:

Exploring a rich array of folk traditions that developed in the Ukrainian diaspora and in Ukraine during the twentieth century, Ukrainian Otherlands is an innovative exploration of modern ethnic identity and the deeply felt (but sometimes deeply different) understandings of ethnicity in homeland and diaspora.

Synopsis:

Ukrainian Otherlands is an innovative exploration of modern ethnic identity, focused on diaspora/homeland understandings of each other in Ukraine and in Ukrainian ethnic communities around the globe. Exploring a rich array of folk songs, poetry and stories, trans-Atlantic correspondence, family histories, and rituals of homecoming and hosting that developed in the Ukrainian diaspora and Ukraine during the twentieth century, Natalia Khanenko-Friesen asserts that many important aspects of modern ethnic identity form, develop, and reveal themselves not only through the diasporaand#8217;s continued yearning for the homeland, but also in a homelandand#8217;s deeply felt connection to its diaspora. Yet, she finds each group imagines the and#147;otherlandand#8221; and ethnic identity differently, leading to misunderstandings between Ukrainians and their ethnic-Ukrainian and#147;brothers and sistersand#8221; abroad.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; An innovative exploration of the persistence of vernacular culture in the modern world, Ukrainian Otherlands, amply informed by theory and fieldwork, will appeal to those interested in folklore, ethnic and diaspora studies, modernity, migration, folk psychology, history, and cultural anthropology.

About the Author

Diana Howansky Reilly has master's degrees from Johns Hopkins University, in international affairs, and from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She lives in Connecticut.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Note on Transliteration
and#160;
Prologue: The Realization
Caught on the Battlefield of World War II
The Reality of the Soviet-Polish Population Exchange
Operation Vistula: The Solution to the andquot;Ukrainian Problemandquot;
Prisoners in the Central Labor Camp in Jaworzno
A New Home in the Recovered Territories?
Epilogue: The andquot;Compensationandquot;
and#160;
Notes
Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780299293406
Author:
Reilly, Diana Howansky
Publisher:
University of Wisconsin Press
Author:
Vansina, Jan
Author:
Helms, Elissa
Author:
Khanenko-Friesen, Natalia
Subject:
Russia (pre & post Soviet Union)
Subject:
Military-World War II General
Subject:
Folklore & Mythology
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Folklore Stud in a Multicultural World
Publication Date:
20130631
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
33 b/w illus.
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Human Rights
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » Russia » General Russian History
History and Social Science » World History » European History General

Scattered: The Forced Relocation of Poland's Ukrainians After World War II New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$24.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages University of Wisconsin Press - English 9780299293406 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Following World War II, the communist government of Poland forcibly relocated the country's Ukrainian minority by means of a Soviet-Polish population exchange and then a secretly planned action code-named Operation Vistula. In Scattered, Diana Howansky Reilly recounts these events through the experiences of three siblings caught up in the conflict, during a turbulent period when compulsory resettlement was a common political tactic used against national minorities to create homogenous states.

and#160;and#160; and#160;Born in the Lemko region of southeastern Poland, Petro, Melania, and Hania Pyrtej survived World War II only to be separated by political decisions over which they had no control. Petro relocated with his wife to Soviet Ukraine during the population exchange of 1944andndash;46, while his sisters Melania and Hania were resettled to western Poland through Operation Vistula in 1947. As the Ukrainian Insurgent Army fought resettlement, the Polish government meanwhile imprisoned suspected sympathizers within the Jaworzno concentration camp. Melania, Reilly's maternal grandmother, eventually found her way to the United States during Poland's period of liberalization in the 1960s.

and#160;and#160; and#160;Drawing on oral interviews and archival research, Reilly tells a fascinating, true story that provides a bottom-up perspective and illustrates the impact of extraordinary historical events on the lives of ordinary people. Tracing the story to the present, she describes survivors' efforts to receive compensation for the destruction of their homes and communities.

"Synopsis" by ,
Vansina, a historian and anthropologist best known for his insights into oral tradition and social memory, draws on his own memories and those of his siblings to reconstruct daily life in Belgium during World War II.

"Synopsis" by , The 1992andndash;95 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina following the dissolution of socialist Yugoslavia became notorious for andldquo;ethnic cleansingandrdquo; and mass rapes targeting the Bosniac (Bosnian Muslim) population. Postwar social and political processes have continued to be dominated by competing nationalisms representing Bosniacs, Serbs, and Croats, as well as those supporting a multiethnic Bosnian state, in which narratives of victimhood take center stage, often in gendered form. Elissa Helms shows that in the aftermath of the war, initiatives by and for Bosnian women perpetuated and complicated dominant images of women as victims and peacemakers in a conflict and political system led by men. In a sober corrective to such accounts, she offers a critical look at the politics of womenandrsquo;s activism and gendered nationalism in a postwar and postsocialist society.
and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Drawing on ethnographic research spanning fifteen years, Innocence and Victimhood demonstrates how womenandrsquo;s activists and NGOs responded to, challenged, and often reinforced essentialist images in affirmative ways, utilizing the moral purity associated with the position of victimhood to bolster social claims, shape political visions, pursue foreign funding, and wage campaigns for postwar justice. Deeply sensitive to the suffering at the heart of Bosnian womenandrsquo;s (and menandrsquo;s) wartime experiences, this book also reveals the limitations to strategies that emphasize innocence and victimhood.
"Synopsis" by ,
Exploring a rich array of folk traditions that developed in the Ukrainian diaspora and in Ukraine during the twentieth century, Ukrainian Otherlands is an innovative exploration of modern ethnic identity and the deeply felt (but sometimes deeply different) understandings of ethnicity in homeland and diaspora.

"Synopsis" by ,
Ukrainian Otherlands is an innovative exploration of modern ethnic identity, focused on diaspora/homeland understandings of each other in Ukraine and in Ukrainian ethnic communities around the globe. Exploring a rich array of folk songs, poetry and stories, trans-Atlantic correspondence, family histories, and rituals of homecoming and hosting that developed in the Ukrainian diaspora and Ukraine during the twentieth century, Natalia Khanenko-Friesen asserts that many important aspects of modern ethnic identity form, develop, and reveal themselves not only through the diasporaand#8217;s continued yearning for the homeland, but also in a homelandand#8217;s deeply felt connection to its diaspora. Yet, she finds each group imagines the and#147;otherlandand#8221; and ethnic identity differently, leading to misunderstandings between Ukrainians and their ethnic-Ukrainian and#147;brothers and sistersand#8221; abroad.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; An innovative exploration of the persistence of vernacular culture in the modern world, Ukrainian Otherlands, amply informed by theory and fieldwork, will appeal to those interested in folklore, ethnic and diaspora studies, modernity, migration, folk psychology, history, and cultural anthropology.

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