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This title in other editions

Other titles in the Yale Agrarian Studies series:

Every Twelve Seconds: Industrialized Slaughter and the Politics of Sight (Yale Agrarian Studies Series Yale Agrarian Studies)

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Every Twelve Seconds: Industrialized Slaughter and the Politics of Sight (Yale Agrarian Studies Series Yale Agrarian Studies) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Close to three quarters of U.S. households buy orange juice. Its popularity crosses class, cultural, racial, and regional divides. Why do so many of us drink orange juice? How did it turn from a luxury into a staple in just a few years? More important, how is it that we dont know the real reasons behind OJs popularity or understand the processes by which the juice is produced?

 

In this enlightening book, Alissa Hamilton explores the hidden history of orange juice. She looks at the early forces that propelled orange juice to prominence, including a surplus of oranges that plagued Florida during most of the twentieth century and the armys need to provide vitamin C to troops overseas during World War II. She tells the stories of the FDAs decision in the early 1960s to standardize orange juice, and the juice equivalent of the cola wars that followed between Coca-Cola (which owns Minute Maid) and Pepsi (which owns Tropicana). Of particular interest to OJ drinkers will be the revelation that most orange juice comes from Brazil, not Florida, and that even “not from concentrate” orange juice is heated, stripped of flavor, stored for up to a year, and then reflavored before it is packaged and sold. The book concludes with a thought-provoking discussion of why consumers have the right to know how their food is produced.

Synopsis:

From inside the chicken factory, a report on the real cost of chicken for farmers, workers, and consumers

Synopsis:

A political scientist goes undercover in a modern industrial slaughterhouse for this twenty-first-century update of Upton Sinclairand#8217;s The Jungle

Synopsis:

This is an account of industrialized killing from a participantand#8217;s point of view. The author, political scientist Timothy Pachirat, was employed undercover for five months in a Great Plains slaughterhouse where 2,500 cattle were killed per dayand#8212;one every twelve seconds. Working in the cooler as a liver hanger, in the chutes as a cattle driver, and on the kill floor as a food-safety quality-control worker, Pachirat experienced firsthand the realities of theand#160;work of killing in modern society. He uses those experiences to explore not only the slaughter industry but also how, as a society, we facilitate violent labor and hide away that which is too repugnant to contemplate.

Through his vivid narrative and ethnographic approach, Pachirat brings to life massive, routine killing from the perspective of those who take part in it. He shows how surveillance and sequestration operate within the slaughterhouse and in its interactions with the community at large. He also considers how society is organized to distance and hide uncomfortable realities from view. With much to say about issues ranging from the sociology of violence and modern food production to animal rights and welfare, Every Twelve Secondsand#160;is an important and disturbing work.

Synopsis:

Anthropologist Steve Striffler begins this book in a poultry processing plant, drawing on his own experiences there as a worker. He also reports on the way chickens are raised today and how they are consumed. What he discovers about Americas favorite meat is not just unpleasant but a powerful indictment of our industrial food system. The process of bringing chicken to our dinner tables is unhealthy for all concerned—from farmer to factory worker to consumer.The book traces the development of the poultry industry since the Second World War, analyzing the impact of such changes as the destruction of the family farm, the processing of chicken into nuggets and patties, and the changing makeup of the industrial labor force. The author describes the lives of immigrant workers and their reception in the small towns where they live. The conclusion is clear: there has to be a better way. Striffler proposes radical but practical change, a plan that promises more humane treatment of chickens, better food for the consumer, and fair payment for food workers and farmers.

About the Author

Steve Striffler is associate professor of anthropology, University of Arkansas.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780300152678
Subtitle:
Industrialized Slaughter and the Politics of Sight
Author:
Pachirat, Timothy
Author:
Striffler, Steve
Author:
Hamilton, Alissa
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
Agriculture & Animal Husbandry
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
Yale Agrarian Studies Series
Publication Date:
20130329
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 b/w illus.
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » History and Criticism
History and Social Science » Sociology » Violence in Society
History and Social Science » World History » General
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » Animal Husbandry
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » General
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » Politics and Economics

Every Twelve Seconds: Industrialized Slaughter and the Politics of Sight (Yale Agrarian Studies Series Yale Agrarian Studies) Used Hardcover
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$14.50 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Yale University Press - English 9780300152678 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
From inside the chicken factory, a report on the real cost of chicken for farmers, workers, and consumers

"Synopsis" by ,
A political scientist goes undercover in a modern industrial slaughterhouse for this twenty-first-century update of Upton Sinclairand#8217;s The Jungle
"Synopsis" by , This is an account of industrialized killing from a participantand#8217;s point of view. The author, political scientist Timothy Pachirat, was employed undercover for five months in a Great Plains slaughterhouse where 2,500 cattle were killed per dayand#8212;one every twelve seconds. Working in the cooler as a liver hanger, in the chutes as a cattle driver, and on the kill floor as a food-safety quality-control worker, Pachirat experienced firsthand the realities of theand#160;work of killing in modern society. He uses those experiences to explore not only the slaughter industry but also how, as a society, we facilitate violent labor and hide away that which is too repugnant to contemplate.

Through his vivid narrative and ethnographic approach, Pachirat brings to life massive, routine killing from the perspective of those who take part in it. He shows how surveillance and sequestration operate within the slaughterhouse and in its interactions with the community at large. He also considers how society is organized to distance and hide uncomfortable realities from view. With much to say about issues ranging from the sociology of violence and modern food production to animal rights and welfare, Every Twelve Secondsand#160;is an important and disturbing work.

"Synopsis" by ,
Anthropologist Steve Striffler begins this book in a poultry processing plant, drawing on his own experiences there as a worker. He also reports on the way chickens are raised today and how they are consumed. What he discovers about Americas favorite meat is not just unpleasant but a powerful indictment of our industrial food system. The process of bringing chicken to our dinner tables is unhealthy for all concerned—from farmer to factory worker to consumer.The book traces the development of the poultry industry since the Second World War, analyzing the impact of such changes as the destruction of the family farm, the processing of chicken into nuggets and patties, and the changing makeup of the industrial labor force. The author describes the lives of immigrant workers and their reception in the small towns where they live. The conclusion is clear: there has to be a better way. Striffler proposes radical but practical change, a plan that promises more humane treatment of chickens, better food for the consumer, and fair payment for food workers and farmers.
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