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The Roof at the Bottom of the World: Discovering the Transantarctic Mountains

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Transantarctic Mountains are the most remote mountain belt on Earth, an utterly pristine wilderness of ice and rock rising to majestic heights and extending for 1,500 miles. In this book, Edmund Stump is the first to show us this continental-scale mountain system in all its stunning beauty and desolation, and the first to provide a comprehensive, fully illustrated history of the region's discovery and exploration.

The author not only has conducted extensive research in the Transantarctic Mountains during his forty-year career as a geologist but has also systematically photographed the entire region. Selecting the best of the best of his more than 8,000 photographs, he presents nothing less than the first atlas of these mountains. In addition, he examines the original firsthand accounts of the heroic Antarctic explorations of James Clark Ross (who discovered the mountain range in the early 1840s), Robert Falcon Scott, Ernest Shackleton, Roald Amundsen, Richard Byrd, and scientists participating in the International Geophysical Year (1957and#8211;1958). From these records, Stump is now able to trace the actual routes of the early explorers with unprecedented accuracy. With maps old and new, stunning photographs never before published, and tales of intrepid explorers, this book takes the armchair traveler on an expedition to the Antarctic wilderness that few have ever seen.

Synopsis:

A fascinating portrait and history of the most obscure mountains on Earth, by a modern scientist-explorer with unsurpassed knowledge of the region

Synopsis:

Published to coincide with the centenary of the first expeditions to reach the South Pole, An Empire of Ice presents a fascinating new take on Antarctic exploration. Retold with added information, it's the first book to place the famed voyages of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, his British rivals Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton, and others in a larger scientific, social, and geopolitical context.

Efficient, well prepared, and focused solely on the goal of getting to his destination and back, Amundsen has earned his place in history as the first to reach the South Pole. Scott, meanwhile, has been reduced in the public mind to a dashing incompetent who stands for little more than relentless perseverance in the face of inevitable defeat. An Empire of Ice offers a new perspective on the Antarctic expeditions of the early twentieth century by looking at the British efforts for what they actually were: massive scientific enterprises in which reaching the South Pole was but a spectacular sideshow. By focusing on the larger purpose, Edward Larson deepens our appreciation of the explorers' achievements, shares little-known stories, and shows what the Heroic Age of Antarctic discovery was really about.

About the Author

Edward J. Larson is University Professor of History and holds the Hugh & Hazel Darling Chair in Law at Pepperdine University. His numerous books include Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate over Science and Religion, for which he received a Pulitzer Prize in History. Larson splits his time between Georgia and California.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780300171976
Author:
Stump, Edmund
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Author:
Solomon, Susan
Author:
Larson, Edward J.
Subject:
Polar Regions
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
Geology
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20111131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
72 b/w illus.
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
10 x 8.5 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
History and Social Science » Arctic and Antarctic » General
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Geography » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Science and Mathematics » Geology » General
Sports and Outdoors » Outdoors » Mountaineering » General

The Roof at the Bottom of the World: Discovering the Transantarctic Mountains New Hardcover
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Product details 272 pages Yale University Press - English 9780300171976 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
A fascinating portrait and history of the most obscure mountains on Earth, by a modern scientist-explorer with unsurpassed knowledge of the region
"Synopsis" by ,
Published to coincide with the centenary of the first expeditions to reach the South Pole, An Empire of Ice presents a fascinating new take on Antarctic exploration. Retold with added information, it's the first book to place the famed voyages of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, his British rivals Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton, and others in a larger scientific, social, and geopolitical context.

Efficient, well prepared, and focused solely on the goal of getting to his destination and back, Amundsen has earned his place in history as the first to reach the South Pole. Scott, meanwhile, has been reduced in the public mind to a dashing incompetent who stands for little more than relentless perseverance in the face of inevitable defeat. An Empire of Ice offers a new perspective on the Antarctic expeditions of the early twentieth century by looking at the British efforts for what they actually were: massive scientific enterprises in which reaching the South Pole was but a spectacular sideshow. By focusing on the larger purpose, Edward Larson deepens our appreciation of the explorers' achievements, shares little-known stories, and shows what the Heroic Age of Antarctic discovery was really about.

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