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Why the West Rules--For Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal about the Future

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Why the West Rules--For Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal about the Future Cover

ISBN13: 9780312611699
ISBN10: 0312611692
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A New York Times Notable Book for 2011

Sometime around 1750, English entrepreneurs unleashed the astounding energies of steam and coal, and the world was forever changed. The emergence of factories, railroads, and gunboats propelled the Wests rise to power in the nineteenth century, and the development of computers and nuclear weapons in the twentieth century secured its global supremacy. Now, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, many worry that the emerging economic power of China and India spells the end of the West as a superpower. In order to understand this possibility, we need to look back in time. Why has the West dominated the globe for the past two hundred years, and will its power last?

Describing the patterns of human history, the archaeologist and historian Ian Morris offers surprising new answers to both questions. It is not, he reveals, differences of race or culture, or even the strivings of great individuals, that explain Western dominance. It is the effects of geography on the everyday efforts of ordinary people as they deal with crises of resources, disease, migration, and climate. As geography and human ingenuity continue to interact, the world will change in astonishing ways, transforming Western rule in the process.

Deeply researched and brilliantly argued, Why the West Rules—for Now spans fifty thousand years of history and offers fresh insights on nearly every page. The book brings together the latest findings across disciplines—from ancient history to neuroscience—not only to explain why the West came to rule the world but also to predict what the future will bring in the next hundred years.

Synopsis:

A New York Times Book Review Editors Choice

An Economist Best Book of the Year

A story fifty thousand years in the making, Why the West Rules—for Now claims a place among the modern classics of world history. Author Ian Morris—polymath, internationally renowned scholar, and “the worlds most talented ancient historian” (Niall Ferguson)—explains anew the story of Western dominance in this unified theory of all things geopolitical. Describing the patterns of human history, Morris brings together the latest findings across disciplines—from ancient history to neuroscience—not only to explain why the West came to rule the world but also to predict what the next hundred years will bring. At once vibrant, scholarly, and entertaining, Why the West Rules—for Now is “a stunningly informative, imaginative, and engaging account...provocative...and intellectually stimulating” (Glenn C. Altschuler, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette).

Synopsis:

Why does the West rule? In this magnum opus, eminent Stanford polymath Ian Morris answers this provocative question, drawing on 50,000 years of history, archeology, and the methods of social science, to make sense of when, how, and why the paths of development differed in the East and West — and what this portends for the 21st century.

There are two broad schools of thought on why the West rules. Proponents of Long-Term Lock-In theories such as Jared Diamond suggest that from time immemorial, some critical factor — geography, climate, or culture perhaps — made East and West unalterably different, and determined that the industrial revolution would happen in the West and push it further ahead of the East. But the East led the West between 500 and 1600, so this development can't have been inevitable; and so proponents of Short-Term Accident theories argue that Western rule was a temporary aberration that is now coming to an end, with Japan, China, and India resuming their rightful places on the world stage. However, as the West led for 9,000 of the previous 10,000 years, it wasn't just a temporary aberration. So, if we want to know why the West rules, we need a whole new theory. Ian Morris, boldly entering the turf of Jared Diamond and Niall Ferguson, provides the broader approach that is necessary, combining the textual historian's focus on context, the anthropological archaeologist's awareness of the deep past, and the social scientist's comparative methods to make sense of the past, present, and future — in a way no one has ever done before.

About the Author

IAN MORRIS is Willard Professor of Classics and History at Stanford University. He has published ten scholarly books, including, most recently, The Dynamics of Ancient Empires, and has directed excavations in Greece and Italy. He lives in the Santa Cruz Mountains in California.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Alan Andersen, January 5, 2012 (view all comments by Alan Andersen)
This book replaces Guns, Germs and Steel as my favorite overview of the development of civilization and a must read for any person that believes that 'those who do not know history are bound to repeat it'.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780312611699
Author:
Morris, Ian
Publisher:
Picador USA
Subject:
World
Subject:
International - Economics
Subject:
World History-Western Civilization
Subject:
Modern - General
Subject:
World History-General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20111031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes 11 bandw illustrations, 51 maps
Pages:
768
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Western Civilization » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Western Civilization

Why the West Rules--For Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal about the Future New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$23.00 In Stock
Product details 768 pages Picador USA - English 9780312611699 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

A New York Times Book Review Editors Choice

An Economist Best Book of the Year

A story fifty thousand years in the making, Why the West Rules—for Now claims a place among the modern classics of world history. Author Ian Morris—polymath, internationally renowned scholar, and “the worlds most talented ancient historian” (Niall Ferguson)—explains anew the story of Western dominance in this unified theory of all things geopolitical. Describing the patterns of human history, Morris brings together the latest findings across disciplines—from ancient history to neuroscience—not only to explain why the West came to rule the world but also to predict what the next hundred years will bring. At once vibrant, scholarly, and entertaining, Why the West Rules—for Now is “a stunningly informative, imaginative, and engaging account...provocative...and intellectually stimulating” (Glenn C. Altschuler, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette).

"Synopsis" by , Why does the West rule? In this magnum opus, eminent Stanford polymath Ian Morris answers this provocative question, drawing on 50,000 years of history, archeology, and the methods of social science, to make sense of when, how, and why the paths of development differed in the East and West — and what this portends for the 21st century.

There are two broad schools of thought on why the West rules. Proponents of Long-Term Lock-In theories such as Jared Diamond suggest that from time immemorial, some critical factor — geography, climate, or culture perhaps — made East and West unalterably different, and determined that the industrial revolution would happen in the West and push it further ahead of the East. But the East led the West between 500 and 1600, so this development can't have been inevitable; and so proponents of Short-Term Accident theories argue that Western rule was a temporary aberration that is now coming to an end, with Japan, China, and India resuming their rightful places on the world stage. However, as the West led for 9,000 of the previous 10,000 years, it wasn't just a temporary aberration. So, if we want to know why the West rules, we need a whole new theory. Ian Morris, boldly entering the turf of Jared Diamond and Niall Ferguson, provides the broader approach that is necessary, combining the textual historian's focus on context, the anthropological archaeologist's awareness of the deep past, and the social scientist's comparative methods to make sense of the past, present, and future — in a way no one has ever done before.

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