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Moneywood: Hollywood in Its Last Age of Excess

Moneywood: Hollywood in Its Last Age of Excess Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

As wild and sexy and over-the-top as the decade it brings to life, Moneywood is the inside story of Hollywood producers in the 80s

 

From Top Gun to Howard the Duck, Hollywood was never more excessive than it was in the 1980s. In the Moneywood era, the purse strings were not controlled by adults, but by pop culture cowboys who couldn't balance their own checkbooks but could fast talk the talent, snowball the Japanese, and explain their way out of Dodge when the grosses came in. Their know-nothing raging narcissistic personalities make Sam Goldwyn look professorial and some of the biggest flops the industry has ever seen (Days of Heaven, Howard the Duck) were released on their watch. They were the producers.  Out to line their pockets, trash each other, and never forget to look out for #1, the Moneywood cast of characters includes:

  • Don Simpson, the Flashdance and Top Gun producer whose big-swinging-dick swagger and bigger drug habit only made him more desirable in studio boardrooms
  • Ronald Betts, the Silver Screen Partners founder and former frat-mate of George W. Bush at Yale who milked that connection for all it was worth (and with Ronald Reagan in the White House it was worth a lot)
  • David Begelman, the embezzler and womanizer who was president of MGM
  • Ray Stark, Jon Peters, Peter Guber, Michael Eisner, Mike Ovitz, Jeffrey Katzenberg, and the other careerists who bent the industry, and their enemies, to their wills

This is a meaty exposé of the real hit men of Hollywood's last go-go decade.

Review:

"Stadiem, a screenwriter and celebrity biographer, provides an exhaustive insider account of the power players of 1980s Hollywood who brought Rambo, Flashdance, and Beverly Hills Cop to the big screen. It was a new age: the studio system and the old guard (Richard Zanuck, Alan Ladd Jr., and Robert Evans) were out in favor of the money men (Eisner, Ovitz, Katzenberg, and Bruckheimer). With Reagan, an entertainer turned world leader in the White House, the decade saw the stock market triple and the cost of making films, credited to Ovitz, rise 400% between 1977 and 1985. 'Movies,' Stadiem argues, 'became the country's new religion, where the Cineplex overwhelmed the church.' Hollywood behind the scenes was dominated almost exclusively by white Jewish men, although there were a few notable exceptions such as the infamous Jon Peters, who got his start cutting hair, dated Barbra Streisand, and parlayed that invaluable connection into briefly becoming a key figure at Columbia. There were few opportunities for minorities or women and even the female go-getters who had a little power, like Columbia's Dawn Steel or Fox studio head Sherry Lansing, lacked the influence and authority to greenlight a movie. A little more than a decade later, however, virtually none of the men who had shaped the new Tinsel Town were still on the scene. Stadiem captures this fleeting sentiment that all that glitters may be gold, but not for long." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

WILLIAM STADIEM is the author of eight books, including Marilyn Monroe Confidential and Dear Senator: A Memoir by the Daughter of Strom Thurmond, as well as co-author of the bestseller Mr. S: My Life with Frank Sinatra.  He is a Harvard-educated lawyer who became a screenwriter and columnist for Andy Warhol's Interview and for Tatler.  He had a ringside seat for many of the outrages and outbursts he writes about in Moneywood. He lives in Los Angeles.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312656898
Subtitle:
Hollywood in Its Last Age of Excess
Publisher:
St. Martin's Griffin
Author:
Stadiem, William
Subject:
Drama-Reference
Subject:
Business Aspects
Subject:
Film & Video - History & Criticism
Subject:
Industries/Entertainment
Subject:
Fil
Subject:
m & Video/History & Criticism
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20140121
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Plus one 16-page color photograph insert
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Reference
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Hollywood
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Reference

Moneywood: Hollywood in Its Last Age of Excess
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 336 pages St. Martin's Press - English 9780312656898 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Stadiem, a screenwriter and celebrity biographer, provides an exhaustive insider account of the power players of 1980s Hollywood who brought Rambo, Flashdance, and Beverly Hills Cop to the big screen. It was a new age: the studio system and the old guard (Richard Zanuck, Alan Ladd Jr., and Robert Evans) were out in favor of the money men (Eisner, Ovitz, Katzenberg, and Bruckheimer). With Reagan, an entertainer turned world leader in the White House, the decade saw the stock market triple and the cost of making films, credited to Ovitz, rise 400% between 1977 and 1985. 'Movies,' Stadiem argues, 'became the country's new religion, where the Cineplex overwhelmed the church.' Hollywood behind the scenes was dominated almost exclusively by white Jewish men, although there were a few notable exceptions such as the infamous Jon Peters, who got his start cutting hair, dated Barbra Streisand, and parlayed that invaluable connection into briefly becoming a key figure at Columbia. There were few opportunities for minorities or women and even the female go-getters who had a little power, like Columbia's Dawn Steel or Fox studio head Sherry Lansing, lacked the influence and authority to greenlight a movie. A little more than a decade later, however, virtually none of the men who had shaped the new Tinsel Town were still on the scene. Stadiem captures this fleeting sentiment that all that glitters may be gold, but not for long." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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