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1 Burnside History of Science- General

Mad Science: Einstein's Fridge, Dewar's Flask, Mach's Speed, and 362 Other Inventions and Discoveries That Made Our World

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Mad Science: Einstein's Fridge, Dewar's Flask, Mach's Speed, and 362 Other Inventions and Discoveries That Made Our World Cover

ISBN13: 9780316208192
ISBN10: 0316208191
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: None
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

365 days of inventions, discoveries, science, and technology, from the editors of Wired Magazine.

On January 30, Rubik applied for a patent on his cube (1975). On the next day, 17 years earlier, the first U.S. Satellite passed through the Van Allen radiation belt. On March 17, the airplane black box made its maiden voyage (1953). And what about today? Every day of the year has a rich scientific and technological heritage just waiting to be uncovered, and Wired's top-flight science-trivia book MAD SCIENCE collects them chronologically, from New Year's Day to year's end, showing just how entertaining, wonderful, bizarre, and relevant science can be.

In 2010, Wired's popular This Day in Tech blog peaked with more than 700,000 page views each month, and one story in 2008 drew more than a million unique viewers. This book will collect the most intriguing anecdotes from the blog's run-one for each day of the year-and publish them in a package that will instantly appeal to hardcore techies and curious laypeople alike.

Review:

"An eclectic calendar of scientific breakthroughs, this compilation of WIRED magazine's 'This Day in Tech' feature is, unsurprisingly, a mixed bag. Meant less to be read straight through than to be dipped into at random, the book feels a little bit like a less capacious version of Wikipedia's 'random article' function (and with, it must be said, about equal odds of landing on something both interesting and well-written). A sampling of entries from solstices and equinoxes would include 'Columbia's Microgroove LP Makes Albums Sound Good' (June 21st, 1948), 'The Curies Discover Radium' (December 21st, 1898), 'Twitter Takes Flight' (March 21st, 2006), and '1792: Day One of Revolutionary Calendar' (September 22nd 1792). With a proliferation of questionable science and technology writing particular to our cultural moment, it's difficult not to feel a little assaulted by constant, unsubstantiated appeals to the faculty of wonder; then again, it's difficult to speak badly of such a good-natured little anthology — its slightness is part of its charm — an amusing novelty, mostly fascinating. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Waney, December 29, 2012 (view all comments by Waney)
I really liked this book. It is full of interesting facts about ordinary things we use everyday. It was written in a way where you could read one entry a day or just sit down with it and gobble it all up in big chunks. It had other little factoids on each page that went with the date of the discoveries that were written about. It was cross referenced so I would find myself flipping back and forth through the book but interesting enough that I would read some entries the second time I came to them and still enjoy it as much as the first time. I was amazed at how many great things were discovered by accident and chance.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780316208192
Author:
Alfred, Randy
Publisher:
Little Brown and Company
Subject:
REFERENCE / Trivia
Subject:
History of Science-General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20121131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English

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Related Subjects


Engineering » Engineering » History
Featured Titles » Science
Reference » Featured Titles
Reference » Science Reference » General
Reference » Trivia
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » New Arrivals
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » Technology
Science and Mathematics » Popular Science » Essays

Mad Science: Einstein's Fridge, Dewar's Flask, Mach's Speed, and 362 Other Inventions and Discoveries That Made Our World Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.50 In Stock
Product details pages Little Brown and Company - English 9780316208192 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "An eclectic calendar of scientific breakthroughs, this compilation of WIRED magazine's 'This Day in Tech' feature is, unsurprisingly, a mixed bag. Meant less to be read straight through than to be dipped into at random, the book feels a little bit like a less capacious version of Wikipedia's 'random article' function (and with, it must be said, about equal odds of landing on something both interesting and well-written). A sampling of entries from solstices and equinoxes would include 'Columbia's Microgroove LP Makes Albums Sound Good' (June 21st, 1948), 'The Curies Discover Radium' (December 21st, 1898), 'Twitter Takes Flight' (March 21st, 2006), and '1792: Day One of Revolutionary Calendar' (September 22nd 1792). With a proliferation of questionable science and technology writing particular to our cultural moment, it's difficult not to feel a little assaulted by constant, unsubstantiated appeals to the faculty of wonder; then again, it's difficult to speak badly of such a good-natured little anthology — its slightness is part of its charm — an amusing novelty, mostly fascinating. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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