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This title in other editions

Other titles in the Los Angeles Times Book Award: Poetry series:

Poems 1962-2012

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Poems 1962-2012 Cover

ISBN13: 9780374126087
ISBN10: 0374126089
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The collected works of the inimitable Pulitzer Prize-winning poet

It is the astonishment of Louise Glücks poetry that it resists collection. With each successive book her drive to leave behind what came before has grown more fierce, the force of her gaze fixed on what has yet to be imagined. She invented a form to accommodate this need, the book-length sequence of poems, like a landscape seen from above, a novel with lacunae opening onto the unspeakable. The reiterated yet endlessly transfigured elements in this landscape—Persephone, a copper beech, a mother and father and sister, a garden, a husband and son, a horse, a dog, a field on fire, a mountain—persistently emerge and reappear with the dark energy of the inevitable, shot through with the bright aspect of things new-made.    

          From the outset (“Come here / Come here, little one”), Glucks voice has addressed us with deceptive simplicity, the poems in lines so clear we “do not see the intervening fathoms.” 

From within the earths

bitter disgrace, coldness and barrenness

my friend the moon rises:

she is beautiful tonight, but when is she not beautiful?

To read these books together is to understand the governing paradox of a life lived in the body and of the work wrested from it, the one fated to die and the other to endure.

Review:

"Though Glück has held national fame since the late 1970s for her terse, pared-down poems, this first career-spanning collected may be the most widely noted, and the most praised, collected poems in some time. Here is the Pulitzer Prize — winning The Wild Iris (1992), whose talking flowers encapsulated birth, death, loss, and hope; here are the starkly framed family memories of her controversial Ararat (1990), and the careful, self-accusing humor of late work such as The Seven Ages (2001). Here, too, are the stormy, almost overexposed poems (reminiscent of Robert Lowell) with which she began, and the calmly uncompromising universals of A Village Life (2009), where 'the mountain stands like a beacon, to remind the night that the earth exists.' Through screens of familiar stories (Achilles, Penelope, Dante) or through overt — albeit terse — autobiography, Glück at once scrutinizes her own life and reflects on the process by which poems get made, the way that we, too, may come to know ourselves: 'Like everyone else,' she reflects, 'I had a story,/ a point of view.// A few words were all I needed:/ nourish, sustain, attack.' Turning life stories to myths; myths to cool, scary proverbs, Glück compares her style accurately to 'bright light through the bare tree,' her process of writing to spying, to silent listening: 'In my own mind, I'm invisible — that's why I'm dangerous.'" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

It is the astonishment of Louise Glücks poetry that it resists collection. With each successive book her drive to leave behind what came before has grown more fierce, the force of her gaze fixed on what has yet to be imagined. She invented a form to accommodate this need, the book-length sequence of poems, like a landscape seen from above, a novel with lacunae opening onto the unspeakable. The reiterated yet endlessly transfigured elements in this landscape—Persephone, a copper beech, a mother and father and sister, a garden, a husband and son, a horse, a dog, a field on fire, a mountain—persistently emerge and reappear with the dark energy of the inevitable, shot through with the bright aspect of things new-made.    

          From the outset (“Come here / Come here, little one”), Glucks voice has addressed us with deceptive simplicity, the poems in lines so clear we “do not see the intervening fathoms.” 

From within the earths

bitter disgrace, coldness and barrenness

my friend the moon rises:

she is beautiful tonight, but when is she not beautiful?

To read these books together is to understand the governing paradox of a life lived in the body and of the work wrested from it, the one fated to die and the other to endure.

About the Author

Louise Glück is the author of eleven books of poems and a collection of essays. Her many awards include the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Bollingen Prize for Poetry, and the Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets. She teaches at Yale University and lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Seann McCollum, January 1, 2013 (view all comments by Seann McCollum)
It always seems strange to me when publishers bring out career-spanning collections while the author is still alive, but this tome is so massive that perhaps they figured that squeezing in whatever else she manages to write in the years to come would split the seams. Or maybe the idea was to get this in print while people are still buying physical books? Regardless of the logic, I'm grateful that this book exists, because it is extraordinarily beautiful, and a must-have for fans of contemporary poetry. I've noticed that many of the reviews of this volume criticize Gluck for being a one-trick pony, or for choosing emotion over intellect, for being overly confessional. I don't think those things are true, but even if they are, when you write so well that you can cram an enormous brick of a book with this many gorgeous, moving poems, I think you've earned the right to write about whatever the hell you want to.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780374126087
Author:
Gluck, Louise
Publisher:
Farrar Straus Giroux
Subject:
Single Author / American
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Subject:
Women Authors
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20121131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Index of Titles and First Lines
Pages:
656
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z
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Poems 1962-2012 New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$40.00 In Stock
Product details 656 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374126087 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Though Glück has held national fame since the late 1970s for her terse, pared-down poems, this first career-spanning collected may be the most widely noted, and the most praised, collected poems in some time. Here is the Pulitzer Prize — winning The Wild Iris (1992), whose talking flowers encapsulated birth, death, loss, and hope; here are the starkly framed family memories of her controversial Ararat (1990), and the careful, self-accusing humor of late work such as The Seven Ages (2001). Here, too, are the stormy, almost overexposed poems (reminiscent of Robert Lowell) with which she began, and the calmly uncompromising universals of A Village Life (2009), where 'the mountain stands like a beacon, to remind the night that the earth exists.' Through screens of familiar stories (Achilles, Penelope, Dante) or through overt — albeit terse — autobiography, Glück at once scrutinizes her own life and reflects on the process by which poems get made, the way that we, too, may come to know ourselves: 'Like everyone else,' she reflects, 'I had a story,/ a point of view.// A few words were all I needed:/ nourish, sustain, attack.' Turning life stories to myths; myths to cool, scary proverbs, Glück compares her style accurately to 'bright light through the bare tree,' her process of writing to spying, to silent listening: 'In my own mind, I'm invisible — that's why I'm dangerous.'" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,

It is the astonishment of Louise Glücks poetry that it resists collection. With each successive book her drive to leave behind what came before has grown more fierce, the force of her gaze fixed on what has yet to be imagined. She invented a form to accommodate this need, the book-length sequence of poems, like a landscape seen from above, a novel with lacunae opening onto the unspeakable. The reiterated yet endlessly transfigured elements in this landscape—Persephone, a copper beech, a mother and father and sister, a garden, a husband and son, a horse, a dog, a field on fire, a mountain—persistently emerge and reappear with the dark energy of the inevitable, shot through with the bright aspect of things new-made.    

          From the outset (“Come here / Come here, little one”), Glucks voice has addressed us with deceptive simplicity, the poems in lines so clear we “do not see the intervening fathoms.” 

From within the earths

bitter disgrace, coldness and barrenness

my friend the moon rises:

she is beautiful tonight, but when is she not beautiful?

To read these books together is to understand the governing paradox of a life lived in the body and of the work wrested from it, the one fated to die and the other to endure.

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