Mega Dose
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | September 18, 2014

    Lin Enger: IMG Knowing vs. Knowing



    On a hot July evening years ago, my Toyota Tercel overheated on a flat stretch of highway north of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A steam geyser shot up from... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$21.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Beaverton African American Studies- Slavery and Reconstruction
17 Local Warehouse Biography- General
12 Remote Warehouse US History- Colonial America

The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family

by

The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family Cover

 

Awards

2008 National Book Award for Nonfiction

Review-A-Day

"[A] very important and powerfully argued history of the Hemings family....Gordon-Reed...has the imagination and the talent of an expert historian....[W]ith this book Gordon-Reed explores Jefferson's relationship to Sally Hemings and the rest of his household slaves with a degree of detail and intimacy never before achieved." Gordon S. Wood, The New Republic (read the entire New Republic review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This epic work — named a best book of the year by the Washington Post, Time, the Los Angeles Times, Amazon, and the San Francisco Chronicle, and a notable book by the New York Times — tells the story of the Hemingses, whose close blood ties to our third president had been systematically expunged from American history until very recently. Now, historian and legal scholar Annette Gordon-Reed traces the Hemings family from its origins in Virginia in the 1700s to the family's dispersal after Jefferson's death in 1826. It brings to life not only Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson but also their children and Hemings's siblings, who shared a father with Jefferson's wife, Martha.

The Hemingses of Monticello sets the family's compelling saga against the backdrop of Revolutionary America, Paris on the eve of its own revolution, 1790s Philadelphia, and plantation life at Monticello. Much anticipated, this book promises to be the most important history of an American slave family ever written.

Review:

"[A] riveting and compassionate family portrait that deserves to endure as a model of historical inquiry. In a field overcrowded with hagiographies of the Founding Fathers...this book stands dramatically apart for its searching intelligence and breadth of humane vision." Chicago Tribune

Review:

"[D]eeply researched, often gripping....Gordon-Reed has given us an important story that is ultimately about the timeless quest for justice and human dignity." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"This is a masterpiece brimming with decades of dedicated research and dexterous writing. It is essential for any collection on U.S. history, Colonial America, Virginia, slavery, or miscegenation." Library Journal

Review:

"Gordon-Reed delivers a powerful composite portrait of the African American family whose labors helped make Jefferson's Virginia residence a fountainhead of American culture....A must-have acquisition for every American history collection." Booklist (Starred Review)

Review:

"There is no clue in the life of this intertwined family that Gordon-Reed does not minutely examine for its most subtle significance....Ponderous but sagacious and ultimately rewarding." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

Historian and legal scholar Gordon-Reed presents this epic work that tells the story of the Hemingses, an American slave family and their close blood ties to Thomas Jefferson.

Synopsis:

This epic work — named a best book of the year by the Washington Post, Time, the Los Angeles Times, Amazon, and the San Francisco Chronicle, and a notable book by the New York Times — tells the story of the Hemingses, whose close blood ties to our third president had been systematically expunged from American history until very recently. Now, historian and legal scholar Annette Gordon-Reed traces the Hemings family from its origins in Virginia in the 1700s to the family's dispersal after Jefferson's death in 1826.

Synopsis:

Winner of the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize: "[A] commanding and important book."--Jill Lepore,

Synopsis:

The immensely rich biography of a houseand#8212;Sylvester Manor, on Shelter Island, New Yorkand#8212;and of the unknown Colonial way of life it reveals The acclaimed author and landscape historian Mac Griswold brings alive the story both of the seventeenth-century provisioning plantation for the West Indies and of its English-Dutch foundersand#8212;the existence of which Griswold uncovered in her ten years of research in the secret family vault, beautiful Georgian house, gardens, and burial grounds. Nathaniel Sylvester and his seventeen-year-old bride, Grizzell, converted Quakers, were at the center of early New England radicalism. And yet they owned twenty-four African slaves, who lived in intimate connection with the family. On-site archeological excavations illuminating 350 years of habitationand#8212;the longest span one family has continuously occupied the same property north of the Mason-Dixon lineand#8212;are themselves a fascinating subtext of Griswoldand#8217;s story. The digs reveal, astonishingly, a Manhansett encampment less than a hundred yards from the house. A number of these people, too, labored on the plantation. The bookand#8217;s story of this forced merger of three cultures, fused in an extraordinary way of life, has never before been so powerfully documented.

Synopsis:

The immensely rich biography of an American house--Sylvester Manor, on Shelter Island, New York--and of the unknown creole way of colonial life it reveals 

Acclaimed author and landscape historian Mac Griswold brings alive both the house, a 17th-century provisioning plantation for the West Indies, and its remarkable English-Dutch founders--a tale uncovered in the course of her ten years of research in the Manor's family vault and barely disturbed grounds. Nathaniel Sylvester and his sixteen-year-old bride Grizzell, converted Quakers, were at the center of early New England radicalism. And yet they owned twenty-two African slaves, living in intimate connection with the family. Astonishingly, as revealed through the on-site work of highly trained archaeologists--excavations that are themselves an engaging subtext of Griswold's story--there was an encampment of Manhansett people less than a hundred yards from the house. A number of these people, too, served the plantation. The book's fascinating illumination of these three cultures fused in an extraordinary and fleeting creole way of life has never before been documented in early American history.

Video

About the Author

Annette Gordon-Reed is a professor of law at New York Law School and a professor of history at Rutgers University. She is the author of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy. She lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393337761
Author:
Gordon-Reed, Annette
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Griswold, Mac
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
cultural heritage
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
African Americans
Subject:
Racially mixed people -- United States.
Subject:
United States / Colonial Period(1600-1775)
Subject:
Biography - General
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20090931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
37 illustrations
Pages:
816
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 9.99 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Bound for Canaan: The Epic Story of... Used Trade Paper $7.50
  2. American Sphinx: The Character of... Used Trade Paper $3.50
  3. Last Lion: The Fall and Rise of Ted... Used Book Club Paperback $2.95
  4. Things I've Been Silent About: Memories Used Hardcover $9.50
  5. Being Elizabeth Used Mass Market $1.25
  6. A Mercy: A Novel
    Used Trade Paper $7.95

Related Subjects


Biography » General
History and Social Science » African American Studies » Slavery and Reconstruction
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Featured Titles
History and Social Science » Military » Civil War » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Slavery
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to Civil War
History and Social Science » US History » Colonial America
History and Social Science » US History » Presidents » Jefferson, Thomas
History and Social Science » US History » Revolution and Constitution Era
History and Social Science » US History » US Presidency
History and Social Science » World History » General

The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$21.95 In Stock
Product details 816 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393337761 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "[A] very important and powerfully argued history of the Hemings family....Gordon-Reed...has the imagination and the talent of an expert historian....[W]ith this book Gordon-Reed explores Jefferson's relationship to Sally Hemings and the rest of his household slaves with a degree of detail and intimacy never before achieved." (read the entire New Republic review)
"Review" by , "[A] riveting and compassionate family portrait that deserves to endure as a model of historical inquiry. In a field overcrowded with hagiographies of the Founding Fathers...this book stands dramatically apart for its searching intelligence and breadth of humane vision."
"Review" by , "[D]eeply researched, often gripping....Gordon-Reed has given us an important story that is ultimately about the timeless quest for justice and human dignity."
"Review" by , "This is a masterpiece brimming with decades of dedicated research and dexterous writing. It is essential for any collection on U.S. history, Colonial America, Virginia, slavery, or miscegenation."
"Review" by , "Gordon-Reed delivers a powerful composite portrait of the African American family whose labors helped make Jefferson's Virginia residence a fountainhead of American culture....A must-have acquisition for every American history collection."
"Review" by , "There is no clue in the life of this intertwined family that Gordon-Reed does not minutely examine for its most subtle significance....Ponderous but sagacious and ultimately rewarding."
"Synopsis" by , Historian and legal scholar Gordon-Reed presents this epic work that tells the story of the Hemingses, an American slave family and their close blood ties to Thomas Jefferson.
"Synopsis" by , This epic work — named a best book of the year by the Washington Post, Time, the Los Angeles Times, Amazon, and the San Francisco Chronicle, and a notable book by the New York Times — tells the story of the Hemingses, whose close blood ties to our third president had been systematically expunged from American history until very recently. Now, historian and legal scholar Annette Gordon-Reed traces the Hemings family from its origins in Virginia in the 1700s to the family's dispersal after Jefferson's death in 1826.
"Synopsis" by , Winner of the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize: "[A] commanding and important book."--Jill Lepore,
"Synopsis" by , The immensely rich biography of a houseand#8212;Sylvester Manor, on Shelter Island, New Yorkand#8212;and of the unknown Colonial way of life it reveals The acclaimed author and landscape historian Mac Griswold brings alive the story both of the seventeenth-century provisioning plantation for the West Indies and of its English-Dutch foundersand#8212;the existence of which Griswold uncovered in her ten years of research in the secret family vault, beautiful Georgian house, gardens, and burial grounds. Nathaniel Sylvester and his seventeen-year-old bride, Grizzell, converted Quakers, were at the center of early New England radicalism. And yet they owned twenty-four African slaves, who lived in intimate connection with the family. On-site archeological excavations illuminating 350 years of habitationand#8212;the longest span one family has continuously occupied the same property north of the Mason-Dixon lineand#8212;are themselves a fascinating subtext of Griswoldand#8217;s story. The digs reveal, astonishingly, a Manhansett encampment less than a hundred yards from the house. A number of these people, too, labored on the plantation. The bookand#8217;s story of this forced merger of three cultures, fused in an extraordinary way of life, has never before been so powerfully documented.
"Synopsis" by ,
The immensely rich biography of an American house--Sylvester Manor, on Shelter Island, New York--and of the unknown creole way of colonial life it reveals 

Acclaimed author and landscape historian Mac Griswold brings alive both the house, a 17th-century provisioning plantation for the West Indies, and its remarkable English-Dutch founders--a tale uncovered in the course of her ten years of research in the Manor's family vault and barely disturbed grounds. Nathaniel Sylvester and his sixteen-year-old bride Grizzell, converted Quakers, were at the center of early New England radicalism. And yet they owned twenty-two African slaves, living in intimate connection with the family. Astonishingly, as revealed through the on-site work of highly trained archaeologists--excavations that are themselves an engaging subtext of Griswold's story--there was an encampment of Manhansett people less than a hundred yards from the house. A number of these people, too, served the plantation. The book's fascinating illumination of these three cultures fused in an extraordinary and fleeting creole way of life has never before been documented in early American history.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.