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This title in other editions

The Internet Police: How Crime Went Online--And the Cops Followed

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The Internet Police: How Crime Went Online--And the Cops Followed Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

With a new afterword that brings the book's stories up to date, including law enforcement's dramatic seizure of the online black market Silk Road.

Once considered a borderless and chaotic virtual landscape, the Internet is now home to the forces of international law and order. It’s not just computer hackers and cyber crooks who lurk in the dark corners of the Web—the cops are there, too.

In The Internet Police, Ars Technica editor Nate Anderson takes readers on a behind-the-screens tour of landmark cybercrime cases, revealing how criminals continue to find digital and legal loopholes even as police hurry to cinch them closed. From the Cleveland man whose “natural male enhancement” pill inadvertently protected the privacy of your e-mail to the Russian spam king who ended up in a Milwaukee jail to the Australian arrest that ultimately led to the breakup of the largest child pornography ring in the United States, Anderson draws on interviews, court documents, and law-enforcement reports to reconstruct accounts of how online policing actually works. Questions of online crime are as complex and interconnected as the Internet itself. With each episode in The Internet Police, Anderson shows the dark side of online spaces—but also how dystopian a fully “ordered” alternative would be.

 

Synopsis:

Chaos and order clash in this riveting exploration of crime and punishment on the Internet.

About the Author

Nate Anderson is a senior editor at Ars Technica. His work has been published in The Economist and Foreign Policy. He lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393349450
Author:
Anderson, Nate
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Internet - Security
Subject:
Internet - General
Publication Date:
20140831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
20.96 x 13.97 mm

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Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Social Aspects » Human and Computer Interaction
Computers and Internet » Internet » General
Computers and Internet » Internet » Information
Computers and Internet » Networking » Computer Security
History and Social Science » Crime » Enforcement and Investigation
History and Social Science » Crime » General
History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime
Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » General

The Internet Police: How Crime Went Online--And the Cops Followed New Trade Paper
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Product details 320 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393349450 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Chaos and order clash in this riveting exploration of crime and punishment on the Internet.
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