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1 Burnside Psychology- Child Psychology

Stranger in the Nest: Do Parents Really Shape Their Child's Personality, Intelligence, or Character

by

Stranger in the Nest: Do Parents Really Shape Their Child's Personality, Intelligence, or Character Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For decades, millions of parents have been told that they are primarily responsible for things gone wrong with their children. Mothers and fathers have internalized this message, producing an unrealistic and damaging sense of guilt, and even betrayal. Parents do affect their children, but how much? Our children are not born as blank slates. They come to us encrypted with their own predilections, biases, strengths, and weaknesses, many of which are as beyond the control of parents as determining their child’s gender or eye color. Here, for the first time, is a scientifically grounded examination of the controversial idea that nature—in the form of genetic blueprints—may have far more influence on how children develop than a particular style of parenting. Parents reeling from the idea that they don’t have much impact on how their children think, feel, and behave, will find both surprise and comfort in psychologist David Cohen’s riveting account of the importance, and limits, of inborn traits. Dr. Cohen weaves together a rich tapestry of research in behavioral genetics to illustrate the degree to which biology, rather than parenting, can impact a child’s personality, values, and aptitudes. Identical twins separated at birth are reunited in mid-life to discover that they both drive the same car, have held the same jobs, named their sons James, and married women with the same first name not once—but twice. Yet siblings reared together in the same family environment often grow up to have very different interests, abilities, and beliefs. The nurture correlation between good parenting and child development fails to explain how, of two children raised in a loving and supportive home, one grows up to be a pillar of the community, while the other becomes a drug abuser. Parents have been blamed for problems ranging from antisocial behavior to autism to schizophrenia—disorders which Dr. Cohen reveals have a strong genetic component. On the flip side, parents who weren’t able to give their offspring a consistently safe and supportive home environment have happily taken the credit when their children grow up to be well-adjusted, hardworking members of society. The truth of the matter is that, if sufficiently strong, inborn potentials can trump parental influence, no matter how positive or negative. Some traits manifest themselves in such unexpected and uncontrollable ways that, for better or for worse, one’s child may indeed seem like a perfect stranger.

Book News Annotation:

Taking an extreme position in the nature-versus-nurture debate, Cohen (psychology, U. of Texas-Austin) offers evidence that genetic blueprints have far more influence than parenting style on a child's personality, values, and aptitudes. He certainly provides an antidote to extreme victimology proponents. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews@booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Called "today's hottest financial idea and getting hotter" by fortune magazine, Economic Value Added (EVA) is the topic of conversation in financial circles around the world, from Germany and Japan to Singapore and South Africa. A revolutionary strategy for creating corporate and shareholder wealth that measures a company's real profitability, it has been adopted by such prominent corporations as Coca-Cola, Eli Lilly, and Siemens AG-with spectacular financial results. Yet, despite its increasing visibility, most executives still only have a vague notion of what EVA is and what it can do for their company. This groundbreaking book explains and clarifies all. Written by Al Ehrbar, a leading business journalist and senior vice president at EVA inventor Stern Stewart & Co., EVA: The Real Key to Creating Wealth provides a complete, accessible overview that examines how exactly EVA works, how it is measured, what it can do to structure incentives for employees, and why it is as potent as it is.

At its most basic, Economic Value Added is a measure of corporate performance that differs from most others by charging profit for the cost of all the capital a company employs, including equity. To help translate principle into real-world practice, Ehrbar presents revealing case histories of EVA success stories, including those of Briggs & Stratton, the U.S. Postal Service, and Coca-Cola, which was catapulted from mediocrity to the number one wealth creator in the world with the addition of EVA.

An in-depth look at a breakthrough idea whose impact is being felt from corporate boardrooms to Wall Street, this indispensable book is must reading for business leaders looking to fully grasp-and profit from-"the real key to creating wealth."

Synopsis:

For decades, millions of parents have been told that they are primarily responsible for things gone wrong with their children. Mothers and fathers have internalized this message, producing an unrealistic and damaging sense of guilt, and even betrayal. Parents do affect their children, but how much? Our children are not born as blank slates. They come to us encrypted with their own predilections, biases, strengths, and weaknesses, many of which are as beyond the control of parents as determining their child’s gender or eye color. Here, for the first time, is a scientifically grounded examination of the controversial idea that nature—in the form of genetic blueprints—may have far more influence on how children develop than a particular style of parenting. Parents reeling from the idea that they don’t have much impact on how their children think, feel, and behave, will find both surprise and comfort in psychologist David Cohen’s riveting account of the importance, and limits, of inborn traits. Dr. Cohen weaves together a rich tapestry of research in behavioral genetics to illustrate the degree to which biology, rather than parenting, can impact a child’s personality, values, and aptitudes. Identical twins separated at birth are reunited in mid-life to discover that they both drive the same car, have held the same jobs, named their sons James, and married women with the same first name not once—but twice. Yet siblings reared together in the same family environment often grow up to have very different interests, abilities, and beliefs. The nurture correlation between good parenting and child development fails to explain how, of two children raised in a loving and supportive home, one grows up to be a pillar of the community, while the other becomes a drug abuser. Parents have been blamed for problems ranging from antisocial behavior to autism to schizophrenia—disorders which Dr. Cohen reveals have a strong genetic component. On the flip side, parents who weren’t able to give their offspring a consistently safe and supportive home environment have happily taken the credit when their children grow up to be well-adjusted, hardworking members of society. The truth of the matter is that, if sufficiently strong, inborn potentials can trump parental influence, no matter how positive or negative. Some traits manifest themselves in such unexpected and uncontrollable ways that, for better or for worse, one’s child may indeed seem like a perfect stranger.

About the Author

DAVID B. COHEN, PhD, received his bachelor's degree from Columbia College, and trained as a psychologist at the University of Michigan. He is currently a professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. For the last two decades, he has researched the impact of biological factors on personality. He is the author of three previous books, including Out of the Blue: Depression and Human Nature.

Table of Contents

Within the Nest.

SATURDAY SIDE:THE NATURE OF NURTURE

Making Connections.

Blaming Parents.

Forging a World.

A Mind of One's Own.

Random Elements.

SUNDAY SIDE:BLUEPRINTS FOR LIFE

Intelligence and Personality.

Vulnerability and Creativity.

Conduct and Character.

Psyche and the Single Gene.

A Prenatal World.

Unmasked Potentials.

Out of the Blue.

Beyond the Nest.

Chapter Notes.

Bibliography.

Index.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780471319221
Subtitle:
Do Parents Really Shape Their Child's Personality, Intelligence, or Character
Author:
Cohen, David
Author:
Cohen, David
Author:
Cohen, David B.
Author:
Ehrbar, Al
Publisher:
Wiley
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Parenting
Subject:
Child Development
Subject:
Personality
Subject:
Nature and nurture
Subject:
Nativism
Subject:
Nativism (Psychology)
Subject:
Developmental - Child
Subject:
Parenting - General
Subject:
Personalityy
Subject:
Psychology: Personality Disorders
Subject:
Psychology : General
Subject:
Making & Problem Solving
Subject:
General Finance & Investments
Copyright:
Publication Date:
January 1999
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
312
Dimensions:
9.26x6.29x1.07 in. 1.30 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » General
Health and Self-Help » Child Psychology » General
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Child Psychology
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Personality Disorders
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Genetics

Stranger in the Nest: Do Parents Really Shape Their Child's Personality, Intelligence, or Character Used Hardcover
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$4.95 In Stock
Product details 312 pages John Wiley & Sons - English 9780471319221 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Called "today's hottest financial idea and getting hotter" by fortune magazine, Economic Value Added (EVA) is the topic of conversation in financial circles around the world, from Germany and Japan to Singapore and South Africa. A revolutionary strategy for creating corporate and shareholder wealth that measures a company's real profitability, it has been adopted by such prominent corporations as Coca-Cola, Eli Lilly, and Siemens AG-with spectacular financial results. Yet, despite its increasing visibility, most executives still only have a vague notion of what EVA is and what it can do for their company. This groundbreaking book explains and clarifies all. Written by Al Ehrbar, a leading business journalist and senior vice president at EVA inventor Stern Stewart & Co., EVA: The Real Key to Creating Wealth provides a complete, accessible overview that examines how exactly EVA works, how it is measured, what it can do to structure incentives for employees, and why it is as potent as it is.

At its most basic, Economic Value Added is a measure of corporate performance that differs from most others by charging profit for the cost of all the capital a company employs, including equity. To help translate principle into real-world practice, Ehrbar presents revealing case histories of EVA success stories, including those of Briggs & Stratton, the U.S. Postal Service, and Coca-Cola, which was catapulted from mediocrity to the number one wealth creator in the world with the addition of EVA.

An in-depth look at a breakthrough idea whose impact is being felt from corporate boardrooms to Wall Street, this indispensable book is must reading for business leaders looking to fully grasp-and profit from-"the real key to creating wealth."

"Synopsis" by , For decades, millions of parents have been told that they are primarily responsible for things gone wrong with their children. Mothers and fathers have internalized this message, producing an unrealistic and damaging sense of guilt, and even betrayal. Parents do affect their children, but how much? Our children are not born as blank slates. They come to us encrypted with their own predilections, biases, strengths, and weaknesses, many of which are as beyond the control of parents as determining their child’s gender or eye color. Here, for the first time, is a scientifically grounded examination of the controversial idea that nature—in the form of genetic blueprints—may have far more influence on how children develop than a particular style of parenting. Parents reeling from the idea that they don’t have much impact on how their children think, feel, and behave, will find both surprise and comfort in psychologist David Cohen’s riveting account of the importance, and limits, of inborn traits. Dr. Cohen weaves together a rich tapestry of research in behavioral genetics to illustrate the degree to which biology, rather than parenting, can impact a child’s personality, values, and aptitudes. Identical twins separated at birth are reunited in mid-life to discover that they both drive the same car, have held the same jobs, named their sons James, and married women with the same first name not once—but twice. Yet siblings reared together in the same family environment often grow up to have very different interests, abilities, and beliefs. The nurture correlation between good parenting and child development fails to explain how, of two children raised in a loving and supportive home, one grows up to be a pillar of the community, while the other becomes a drug abuser. Parents have been blamed for problems ranging from antisocial behavior to autism to schizophrenia—disorders which Dr. Cohen reveals have a strong genetic component. On the flip side, parents who weren’t able to give their offspring a consistently safe and supportive home environment have happily taken the credit when their children grow up to be well-adjusted, hardworking members of society. The truth of the matter is that, if sufficiently strong, inborn potentials can trump parental influence, no matter how positive or negative. Some traits manifest themselves in such unexpected and uncontrollable ways that, for better or for worse, one’s child may indeed seem like a perfect stranger.
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