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Original Essays | April 11, 2014

Paul Laudiero: IMG Shit Rough Draft



I was sitting in a British and Irish romantic drama class my last semester in college when the idea for Shit Rough Drafts hit me. I was working... Continue »
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William Mulholland and the Rise of Los Angeles

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William Mulholland and the Rise of Los Angeles Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

William Mulholland presided over the creation of a water system that forever changed the course of southern California's history. Mulholland, a self-taught engineer, was the chief architect of the Owens Valley Aqueduct—a project ranking in magnitude and daring with the Panama Canal—that brought water to semi-arid Los Angeles from the lush Owens Valley. The story of Los Angeles's quest for water is both famous and notorious: it has been the subject of the classic yet historically distorted movie Chinatown, as well as many other accounts. This first full-length biography of Mulholland challenges many of the prevailing versions of his life story and sheds new light on the history of Los Angeles and its relationship with its most prized resource: water.

Catherine Mulholland, the engineer's granddaughter, provides insights into this story that family familiarity affords, and adds to our historical understanding with extensive primary research in sources such as Mulholland's recently uncovered office files, newspapers, and Department of Water and Power archives. She scrutinizes Mulholland's life—from his childhood in Ireland to his triumphant completion of the Owens Valley Aqueduct to the tragedy that ended his career. This vivid portrait of a rich chapter in the history of Los Angeles is enhanced with a generous selection of previously unpublished photographs.

Los Angeles Times Best Nonfiction Book of 2000

Synopsis:

"William Mulholland was a famed and infamous water and civil engineer, best known for two extraordinary moments in the environmental history of California, one a colossal success, the other an equally stunning failure. The first is the construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct and the second is the building of the fated St. Francis Dam, which came crashing down in 1928. Catherine Mulholland deals with her grandfather's alpha and omega moments dispassionately and in detail. But in between those events are more than a decade in the life of the great engineer and potential politician, and we gain a rich profile of the entire era here. This is a richly detailed, well-written life of a critical figure in the history of Los Angeles and the modern American West. It is an important contribution."—William Deverell, author of Railroad Crossing: Californians and the Railroad

Synopsis:

William Mulholland presided over the creation of a water system that forever changed the course of southern California's history. Mulholland, a self-taught engineer, was the chief architect of the Owens Valley Aqueduct--a project ranking in magnitude and daring with the Panama Canal--that brought water to semi-arid Los Angeles from the lush Owens Valley. The story of Los Angeles's quest for water is both famous and notorious: it has been the subject of the classic yet historically distorted movie Chinatown, as well as many other accounts. This first full-length biography of Mulholland challenges many of the prevailing versions of his life story and sheds new light on the history of Los Angeles and its relationship with its most prized resource: water.

Catherine Mulholland, the engineer's granddaughter, provides insights into this story that family familiarity affords, and adds to our historical understanding with extensive primary research in sources such as Mulholland's recently uncovered office files, newspapers, and Department of Water and Power archives. She scrutinizes Mulholland's life--from his childhood in Ireland to his triumphant completion of the Owens Valley Aqueduct to the tragedy that ended his career. This vivid portrait of a rich chapter in the history of Los Angeles is enhanced with a generous selection of previously unpublished photographs.

Los Angeles Times Best Nonfiction Book of 2000

About the Author

Catherine Mulholland is author of Calabasas Girls: An Intimate History (1976) and The Owensmouth Baby: The Making of a San Fernando Town (1987).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780520234666
Author:
Mulholland, Catherine
Publisher:
University of California Press
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - State & Local
Subject:
Water-supply
Subject:
United States - State & Local - General
Subject:
Mulholland, William
Subject:
Water-supply -- California -- Los Angeles.
Subject:
Americana-General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20020531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
40 b/w photographs, 7 maps
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1 in 23 oz

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Landscape Architecture
History and Social Science » Americana » General
History and Social Science » Americana » Los Angeles
Reference » Science Reference » Technology

William Mulholland and the Rise of Los Angeles New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$31.95 In Stock
Product details 432 pages University of California Press - English 9780520234666 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
"William Mulholland was a famed and infamous water and civil engineer, best known for two extraordinary moments in the environmental history of California, one a colossal success, the other an equally stunning failure. The first is the construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct and the second is the building of the fated St. Francis Dam, which came crashing down in 1928. Catherine Mulholland deals with her grandfather's alpha and omega moments dispassionately and in detail. But in between those events are more than a decade in the life of the great engineer and potential politician, and we gain a rich profile of the entire era here. This is a richly detailed, well-written life of a critical figure in the history of Los Angeles and the modern American West. It is an important contribution."—William Deverell, author of Railroad Crossing: Californians and the Railroad
"Synopsis" by ,
William Mulholland presided over the creation of a water system that forever changed the course of southern California's history. Mulholland, a self-taught engineer, was the chief architect of the Owens Valley Aqueduct--a project ranking in magnitude and daring with the Panama Canal--that brought water to semi-arid Los Angeles from the lush Owens Valley. The story of Los Angeles's quest for water is both famous and notorious: it has been the subject of the classic yet historically distorted movie Chinatown, as well as many other accounts. This first full-length biography of Mulholland challenges many of the prevailing versions of his life story and sheds new light on the history of Los Angeles and its relationship with its most prized resource: water.

Catherine Mulholland, the engineer's granddaughter, provides insights into this story that family familiarity affords, and adds to our historical understanding with extensive primary research in sources such as Mulholland's recently uncovered office files, newspapers, and Department of Water and Power archives. She scrutinizes Mulholland's life--from his childhood in Ireland to his triumphant completion of the Owens Valley Aqueduct to the tragedy that ended his career. This vivid portrait of a rich chapter in the history of Los Angeles is enhanced with a generous selection of previously unpublished photographs.

Los Angeles Times Best Nonfiction Book of 2000

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