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The Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost Imagination

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The Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost Imagination Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Sarah Schulman, as always, hits the nail on the head. I can't imagine a more insightful probe into gentrification and its inhumane consequences. Everyone needs to read this book."—Martin Duberman, author of Stonewall

“Sarah Schulman's The Gentrification of the Mind is a bulwark against the collective loss of memory. AIDS, gentrification, the struggle for gay rights, the class war that has driven entire communities of artists, immigrants, and outsiders from the neighborhoods they created—all these things have been erased by the official culture. Schulman's book will make you rage and weep, and then—just maybe—organize.”—Luc Sante, author of Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York

"Hard-headed, sensitive, and informed, this book will make the confused world of urban redevelopment and gentrification make notably more sense. Schulman has a mind as clear as a bell in evening. You'll be glad you read it. I was."—Samuel R. Delany, author of Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders

Review:

"In her latest book, queer activist Schulman (Ties that Bind) argues that the AIDS epidemic that ravaged the gay community in the U.S. from 1981 to 1996 spurred the process of gentrification, 'a concrete replacement process,' not only in New York City, but in the larger spheres of American theater, literature, and art. She seeks to demonstrate how 'the unexplored consequences of AIDS and the literal gentrification of cities created a diminished consciousness about how political and artistic change get made.' Schulman, who was a member of ACT UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power), makes a bold argument, linking the rapid decline of the gay male population in New York City due to AIDS-especially in neighborhoods such as Chelsea, the East Village, Harlem, and the West Village-to the trend of homogenization, corporate takeovers, and rising rents. She warns, 'Pretending that AIDS is not happening and never happened, so that we don't have to be accountable, destroys our integrity and therefore our future.' Schulman's firsthand experience of the epidemic and the queer community should make for a poignant and stirring story, but the author's argument soon devolves into name dropping and discourses against motherhood and academia, to name a few. These diatribes are brimming with so much vitriol that they ultimately come across as the personal agenda of someone with an ax to grind rather than cogent research. "
Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

In this gripping memoir of the AIDS years (1981–1996), Sarah Schulman recalls how much of the rebellious queer culture, cheap rents, and a vibrant downtown arts movement vanished almost overnight to be replaced by gay conservative spokespeople and mainstream consumerism. Schulman takes us back to her Lower East Side and brings it to life, filling these pages with vivid memories of her avant-garde queer friends and dramatically recreating the early years of the AIDS crisis as experienced by a political insider. Interweaving personal reminiscence with cogent analysis, Schulman details her experience as a witness to the loss of a generations imagination and the consequences of that loss.

About the Author

Sarah Schulman, Distinguished Professor of English at CUNY, Staten Island, is the author of nine novels, five books of nonfiction, plays, and films.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Making Record from Memory

Part I. Understanding the Past

1. The Dynamics of Death and Replacement

2. The Gentrification of AIDS

3. Realizing That Theyre Gone

Part II. The Consequences Of Loss

4. The Gentrification of Creation

5. The Gentrification of Gay Politics

6. The Gentrification of Our Literature

Conclusion: Degentrification—The Pleasure of Being

Uncomfortable

Product Details

ISBN:
9780520264779
Author:
Schulman, Sarah
Publisher:
University of California Press
Subject:
Health and Medicine-Medical Specialties
Subject:
United States - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20120231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Gay and Lesbian » History and Social Science » History and Biographies
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » US History » General

The Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost Imagination New Hardcover
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$30.95 In Stock
Product details 192 pages University of California Press - English 9780520264779 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In her latest book, queer activist Schulman (Ties that Bind) argues that the AIDS epidemic that ravaged the gay community in the U.S. from 1981 to 1996 spurred the process of gentrification, 'a concrete replacement process,' not only in New York City, but in the larger spheres of American theater, literature, and art. She seeks to demonstrate how 'the unexplored consequences of AIDS and the literal gentrification of cities created a diminished consciousness about how political and artistic change get made.' Schulman, who was a member of ACT UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power), makes a bold argument, linking the rapid decline of the gay male population in New York City due to AIDS-especially in neighborhoods such as Chelsea, the East Village, Harlem, and the West Village-to the trend of homogenization, corporate takeovers, and rising rents. She warns, 'Pretending that AIDS is not happening and never happened, so that we don't have to be accountable, destroys our integrity and therefore our future.' Schulman's firsthand experience of the epidemic and the queer community should make for a poignant and stirring story, but the author's argument soon devolves into name dropping and discourses against motherhood and academia, to name a few. These diatribes are brimming with so much vitriol that they ultimately come across as the personal agenda of someone with an ax to grind rather than cogent research. "
Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
In this gripping memoir of the AIDS years (1981–1996), Sarah Schulman recalls how much of the rebellious queer culture, cheap rents, and a vibrant downtown arts movement vanished almost overnight to be replaced by gay conservative spokespeople and mainstream consumerism. Schulman takes us back to her Lower East Side and brings it to life, filling these pages with vivid memories of her avant-garde queer friends and dramatically recreating the early years of the AIDS crisis as experienced by a political insider. Interweaving personal reminiscence with cogent analysis, Schulman details her experience as a witness to the loss of a generations imagination and the consequences of that loss.
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