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When My Name Was Keoko

by

When My Name Was Keoko Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Tree-ear, an orphan, lives under a bridge in Chulpo, a potters village famed for delicate celadon ware. He has become fascinated with the potters craft; he wants nothing more than to watch master potter Min at work, and he dreams of making a pot of his own someday. When Min takes Tree-ear on as his helper, Tree-ear is elated — until he finds obstacles in his path: the backbreaking labor of digging and hauling clay, Mins irascible temper, and his own ignorance. But Tree-ear is determined to prove himself — even if it means taking a long, solitary journey on foot to present Mins work in the hope of a royal commission . . . even if it means arriving at the royal court with nothing to show but a single celadon shard.

Synopsis:

A stirring novel of South Korea during WWII where a family must secretly protect their flag, their folktales, and their Korean culture from the watchful eye of the Japanese occupation, written Newbery Medalist Linda Sue Park. Now a Sandpiper paperback!

Synopsis:

Sun-hee and her older brother, Tae-yul, live in Korea with their parents. Because Korea is under Japanese occupation, the children study Japanese and speak it at school. Their own language, their flag, the folktales Uncle tells them—even their names—are all part of the Korean culture that is now forbidden. When World War II comes to Korea, Sun-hee is surprised that the Japanese expect their Korean subjects to fight on their side. But the greatest shock of all comes when Tae-yul enlists in the Japanese army in an attempt to protect Uncle, who is suspected of aiding the Korean resistance. Sun-hee stays behind, entrusted with the life-and-death secrets of a family at war.

Synopsis:

In a riveting narrative set in fifteenth-century Korea, two brothers discover a shared passion for kites. Kee-sup can craft a kite unequaled in strength and beauty, but his younger brother, Young-sup, can fly a kite as if he controlled the wind itself. Their combined skills attract the notice of Korea's young king, who chooses Young-sup to fly the royal kite in the New Year kite-flying competition--an honor that is also an awesome responsibility. Although tradition decrees, and the boys' father insists, that the older brother represent the family, both brothers know that this time the family's honor is best left in Young-sup's hands. This touching and suspenseful story, filled with the authentic detail and flavor of traditional Korean kite fighting, brings a remarkable setting vividly to life. AUTHOR'S NOTE.

Synopsis:

Both Maggie Fortini and her brother, Joey-Mick, were named for baseball great Joe DiMaggio. Unlike Joey-Mick, Maggie doesnt play baseball—but at almost ten years old, she is a dyed-in-the-wool fan of the Brooklyn Dodgers. Maggie can recite all the players statistics and understands the subtleties of the game. Unfortunately, Jim Maine is a Giants fan, but its Jim who teaches Maggie the fine art of scoring a baseball game. Not only can she revisit every play of every inning, but by keeping score she feels shes more than just a fan: shes helping her team.

Jim is drafted into the army and sent to Korea, and although Maggie writes to him often, his silence is just one of a string of disappointments—being a Brooklyn Dodgers fan in the early 1950s meant season after season of near misses and year after year of dashed hopes. But Maggie goes on trying to help the Dodgers, and when she finds out that Jim needs help, too, shes determined to provide it. Against a background of major league baseball and the Korean War on the home front, Maggie looks for, and finds, a way to make a difference.

Even those readers who think they dont care about baseball will be drawn into the world of the true and ardent fan. Linda Sue Parks captivating story will, of course, delight those who are already keeping score.

Synopsis:

When her father leaves to fight in World War II, Elizabeth goes with her mother and sister to her grandfather's house, where she learns to face up to the always puzzling and often cruel realities of the adult world.

Synopsis:

There are things to be afraid of in the woods at the end of Autumn Street. But the year she goes to live in her grandfather's big house—while her father is fighting in World War II—Elizabeth can't put a name to those dark, shadowy fears. But she finds solace in her friendship with Charles, a boy who teaches her to take risks. Together the two children try to interpret an adult world that is always puzzling and often cruel.  Together, on a day when snow obscures everything but terror, they leave that world behind and enter the world that is waiting in the woods. This lovely repackaged edition features a new introduction by the author.

Synopsis:

A Long Walk to Water begins as two stories, told in alternating sections, about a girl in Sudan in 2008 and a boy in Sudan in 1985. The girl, Nya, is fetching water from a pond that is two hours walk from her home: she makes two trips to the pond every day. The boy, Salva, becomes one of the "lost boys" of Sudan, refugees who cover the African continent on foot as they search for their families and for a safe place to stay. Enduring every hardship from loneliness to attack by armed rebels to contact with killer lions and crocodiles, Salva is a survivor, and his story goes on to intersect with Nyas in an astonishing and moving way.

About the Author

Linda Sue Park is the author of the Newbery Medal book A Single Shard, many other novels, several picture books, and most recently a book of poetry: Tap Dancing on the Roof: Sijo (Poems). She lives in Rochester, New York, with her family, and is now a devoted fan of the New York Mets. For more infromation visit www.lspark.com.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780547722399
Author:
Park, Linda Sue
Publisher:
Harcourt Brace and Company
Author:
Lowry, Lois
Subject:
Historical - Asia
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Baseball
Subject:
People & Places - Africa
Subject:
Korea
Subject:
Historical - Military & Wars
Subject:
Ethnic - Asian American
Subject:
WW II;grandparents;friendship;loss;Lois Lowry;coming-of-age
Subject:
World War II;Newbery medal;South Korea;history;Japanese occupation;army;war;fami
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20120431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 4 up to 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
black and white illustrations
Pages:
144
Dimensions:
7.63 x 5.13 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 9 up to 12

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » Asia
Children's » Historical Fiction » Military and War
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Young Adult » General

When My Name Was Keoko New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.99 In Stock
Product details 144 pages Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) - English 9780547722399 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
A stirring novel of South Korea during WWII where a family must secretly protect their flag, their folktales, and their Korean culture from the watchful eye of the Japanese occupation, written Newbery Medalist Linda Sue Park. Now a Sandpiper paperback!
"Synopsis" by , Sun-hee and her older brother, Tae-yul, live in Korea with their parents. Because Korea is under Japanese occupation, the children study Japanese and speak it at school. Their own language, their flag, the folktales Uncle tells them—even their names—are all part of the Korean culture that is now forbidden. When World War II comes to Korea, Sun-hee is surprised that the Japanese expect their Korean subjects to fight on their side. But the greatest shock of all comes when Tae-yul enlists in the Japanese army in an attempt to protect Uncle, who is suspected of aiding the Korean resistance. Sun-hee stays behind, entrusted with the life-and-death secrets of a family at war.
"Synopsis" by , In a riveting narrative set in fifteenth-century Korea, two brothers discover a shared passion for kites. Kee-sup can craft a kite unequaled in strength and beauty, but his younger brother, Young-sup, can fly a kite as if he controlled the wind itself. Their combined skills attract the notice of Korea's young king, who chooses Young-sup to fly the royal kite in the New Year kite-flying competition--an honor that is also an awesome responsibility. Although tradition decrees, and the boys' father insists, that the older brother represent the family, both brothers know that this time the family's honor is best left in Young-sup's hands. This touching and suspenseful story, filled with the authentic detail and flavor of traditional Korean kite fighting, brings a remarkable setting vividly to life. AUTHOR'S NOTE.
"Synopsis" by ,
Both Maggie Fortini and her brother, Joey-Mick, were named for baseball great Joe DiMaggio. Unlike Joey-Mick, Maggie doesnt play baseball—but at almost ten years old, she is a dyed-in-the-wool fan of the Brooklyn Dodgers. Maggie can recite all the players statistics and understands the subtleties of the game. Unfortunately, Jim Maine is a Giants fan, but its Jim who teaches Maggie the fine art of scoring a baseball game. Not only can she revisit every play of every inning, but by keeping score she feels shes more than just a fan: shes helping her team.

Jim is drafted into the army and sent to Korea, and although Maggie writes to him often, his silence is just one of a string of disappointments—being a Brooklyn Dodgers fan in the early 1950s meant season after season of near misses and year after year of dashed hopes. But Maggie goes on trying to help the Dodgers, and when she finds out that Jim needs help, too, shes determined to provide it. Against a background of major league baseball and the Korean War on the home front, Maggie looks for, and finds, a way to make a difference.

Even those readers who think they dont care about baseball will be drawn into the world of the true and ardent fan. Linda Sue Parks captivating story will, of course, delight those who are already keeping score.

"Synopsis" by ,
When her father leaves to fight in World War II, Elizabeth goes with her mother and sister to her grandfather's house, where she learns to face up to the always puzzling and often cruel realities of the adult world.
"Synopsis" by ,
There are things to be afraid of in the woods at the end of Autumn Street. But the year she goes to live in her grandfather's big house—while her father is fighting in World War II—Elizabeth can't put a name to those dark, shadowy fears. But she finds solace in her friendship with Charles, a boy who teaches her to take risks. Together the two children try to interpret an adult world that is always puzzling and often cruel.  Together, on a day when snow obscures everything but terror, they leave that world behind and enter the world that is waiting in the woods. This lovely repackaged edition features a new introduction by the author.
"Synopsis" by ,
A Long Walk to Water begins as two stories, told in alternating sections, about a girl in Sudan in 2008 and a boy in Sudan in 1985. The girl, Nya, is fetching water from a pond that is two hours walk from her home: she makes two trips to the pond every day. The boy, Salva, becomes one of the "lost boys" of Sudan, refugees who cover the African continent on foot as they search for their families and for a safe place to stay. Enduring every hardship from loneliness to attack by armed rebels to contact with killer lions and crocodiles, Salva is a survivor, and his story goes on to intersect with Nyas in an astonishing and moving way.
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