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Public Memory in Early China

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Public Memory in Early China Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In early imperial China, the dead were remembered by stereotyping them, by relating them to the existing public memory and not by vaunting what made each person individually distinct and extraordinary in his or her lifetime. Their posthumous names were chosen from a limited predetermined pool; their descriptors were derived from set phrases in the classical tradition; and their identities were explicitly categorized as being like this cultural hero or that sage official in antiquity. In other words, postmortem remembrance was a process of pouring new ancestors into prefabricated molds or stamping them with rigid cookie cutters. Public Memory in Early China is an examination of this pouring and stamping process. After surveying ways in which learning in the early imperial period relied upon memorization and recitation, K. E. Brashier treats three definitive parameters of identity--name, age, and kinship--as ways of negotiating a person's relative position within the collective consciousness. He then examines both the tangible and intangible media responsible for keeping that defined identity welded into the infrastructure of Han public memory.

Synopsis:

K. E. Brashier examines practices of memorializing the dead in early imperial China. After surveying how learning in this period relied on memorization and recitation, he treats the parameters name, age, and kinship as ways of identifying a person in Han public memory, as well as the media responsible for preserving the deceased person's identity.

About the Author

K. E. Brashier is Professor of Religion at Reed College.

Reed College

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674492035
Author:
Brashier, K. E.
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
China
Subject:
Social Science-Customs & Traditions
Subject:
Society & Culture: General
Subject:
World History - China
Series:
Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series
Series Volume:
91
Publication Date:
20140631
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 halftones, 10 line illustrations, 3 t
Pages:
526
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » World History » China
History and Social Science » World History » General

Public Memory in Early China New Hardcover
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Product details 526 pages Harvard University Press - English 9780674492035 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , K. E. Brashier examines practices of memorializing the dead in early imperial China. After surveying how learning in this period relied on memorization and recitation, he treats the parameters name, age, and kinship as ways of identifying a person in Han public memory, as well as the media responsible for preserving the deceased person's identity.
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