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Does Conquest Pay?: The Exploitation of Occupied Industrial Societies (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics)

Does Conquest Pay?: The Exploitation of Occupied Industrial Societies (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Can foreign invaders successfully exploit industrial economies? Since control over economic resources is a key source of power, the answer affects the likelihood of aggression and how strenuously states should counter it. The resurgence of nationalism has led many policymakers and scholars to doubt that conquest still pays. But, until now, the "cumulativity" of industrial resources has never been subjected to systematic analysis.

Does Conquest Pay? demonstrates that expansion can, in fact, provide rewards to aggressor nations. Peter Liberman argues that invaders can exploit industrial societies for short periods of time and can maintain control and economic performance over the long term. This is because modern societies are uniquely vulnerable to coercion and repression. Hence, by wielding a gun in one hand and offering food with the other, determined conquerors can compel collaboration and suppress resistance. Liberman's argument is supported by several historical case studies: Germany's capture of Belgium and Luxembourg during World War I and of nearly all of Europe during World War II; France's seizure of the Ruhr in 1923-24; the Japanese Empire during 1910-45; and Soviet hegemony over Eastern Europe in 1945-89.

Does Conquest Pay? suggests that the international system is more war-prone than many optimists claim. Liberman's findings also contribute to debates about the stability of empires and other authoritarian regimes, the effectiveness of national resistance strategies, and the sources of rebellious collective action.

Synopsis:

Can foreign invaders successfully exploit industrial economies? Since control over economic resources is a key source of power, the answer affects the likelihood of aggression and how strenuously states should counter it. The resurgence of nationalism has led many policymakers and scholars to doubt that conquest still pays. But, until now, the "cumulativity" of industrial resources has never been subjected to systematic analysis.

Does Conquest Pay? demonstrates that expansion can, in fact, provide rewards to aggressor nations. Peter Liberman argues that invaders can exploit industrial societies for short periods of time and can maintain control and economic performance over the long term. This is because modern societies are uniquely vulnerable to coercion and repression. Hence, by wielding a gun in one hand and offering food with the other, determined conquerors can compel collaboration and suppress resistance. Liberman's argument is supported by several historical case studies: Germany's capture of Belgium and Luxembourg during World War I and of nearly all of Europe during World War II; France's seizure of the Ruhr in 1923-24; the Japanese Empire during 1910-45; and Soviet hegemony over Eastern Europe in 1945-89.

Does Conquest Pay? suggests that the international system is more war-prone than many optimists claim. Liberman's findings also contribute to debates about the stability of empires and other authoritarian regimes, the effectiveness of national resistance strategies, and the sources of rebellious collective action.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [209]-242) and index.

Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables
Preface and Acknowledgments
Ch. 1Does Conquest Pay?3
Ch. 2When Does Conquest Pay?18
Ch. 3Nazi-Occupied Western Europe, 1940-194436
Ch. 4Belgium and Luxembourg, 1914-191869
Ch. 5The Ruhr-Rhineland, 1923-192487
Ch. 6The Japanese Empire, 1910-194599
Ch. 7The Soviet Empire, 1945-1989120
Ch. 8The Spoils of Conquest146
Notes159
Works Cited209
Index243

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691029863
Subtitle:
The Exploitation of Occupied Industrial Societies
Author:
Liberman, Peter
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, N.J. :
Subject:
History & Theory
Subject:
Case studies
Subject:
Economic aspects
Subject:
Military occupation
Subject:
Military occupation -- Economic aspects -- Case studies.
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
Economics
Subject:
European History
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Military occupation -- Economic aspects.
Subject:
Politics - General
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Princeton Studies in International History and Politics Hardcover
Series Volume:
J
Publication Date:
19951231
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
4 line illus. 26 tables
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 20 oz

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy

Does Conquest Pay?: The Exploitation of Occupied Industrial Societies (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics)
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Product details 272 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691029863 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Can foreign invaders successfully exploit industrial economies? Since control over economic resources is a key source of power, the answer affects the likelihood of aggression and how strenuously states should counter it. The resurgence of nationalism has led many policymakers and scholars to doubt that conquest still pays. But, until now, the "cumulativity" of industrial resources has never been subjected to systematic analysis.

Does Conquest Pay? demonstrates that expansion can, in fact, provide rewards to aggressor nations. Peter Liberman argues that invaders can exploit industrial societies for short periods of time and can maintain control and economic performance over the long term. This is because modern societies are uniquely vulnerable to coercion and repression. Hence, by wielding a gun in one hand and offering food with the other, determined conquerors can compel collaboration and suppress resistance. Liberman's argument is supported by several historical case studies: Germany's capture of Belgium and Luxembourg during World War I and of nearly all of Europe during World War II; France's seizure of the Ruhr in 1923-24; the Japanese Empire during 1910-45; and Soviet hegemony over Eastern Europe in 1945-89.

Does Conquest Pay? suggests that the international system is more war-prone than many optimists claim. Liberman's findings also contribute to debates about the stability of empires and other authoritarian regimes, the effectiveness of national resistance strategies, and the sources of rebellious collective action.

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