Star Wars Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN!

Weekly drawing for $100 credit. Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

More at Powell's


Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lauren Owen: IMG The Other Vampire



It's a wild and thundery night. Inside a ramshackle old manor house, a beautiful young girl lies asleep in bed. At the window, a figure watches... Continue »
  1. $18.90 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Quick

    Lauren Owen 9780812993271

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$47.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
3 Local Warehouse Anthropology- Cultural Anthropology
2 Remote Warehouse Politics- General

Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy

by

Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Why do some democratic governments succeed and others fail? In a book that has received attention from policymakers and civic activists in America and around the world, Robert Putnam and his collaborators offer empirical evidence for the importance of "civic community" in developing successful institutions. Their focus is on a unique experiment begun in 1970 when Italy created new governments for each of its regions. After spending two decades analyzing the efficacy of these governments in such fields as agriculture, housing, and health services, they reveal patterns of associationism, trust, and cooperation that facilitate good governance and economic prosperity.

Synopsis:

This text offers empirical evidence for the importance of "civic community" in developing successful institutions. Its focus is on an experiment begun in 1970 when Italy created new governments for each of its regions.

Synopsis:

Why do some democratic governments succeed and others fail? In a world full of hope for democratization but wary of government failure, this book offers empirical evidence for the importance of civic community in developing successful institutions. As part of a unique experiment begun in 1970 when Italy created new governments for each of its regions - regions that vary greatly from the standpoint of wealth, social structure, and political leanings - Robert Putnam and his collaborators spent two decades evaluating the performance of these governments in such fields as agriculture, housing, and health services. Their findings were surprising: regions that enjoy effective government in the 1990s have inherited a legacy of civic engagement that can be traced back to the early Middle Ages. Just as Tocqueville traveled to America to try to understand democracy, Putnam and his colleagues draw broad lessons for democratic theory from their twenty-year journey through Italy. Their conclusions challenge the simple-minded thesis of the primacy of economics and the easy optimism of social engineers. Based on dozens of case studies and thousands of interviews with politicians, community leaders, and ordinary citizens, this book illuminates patterns of associationism, trust, and cooperation that facilitate good governance and economic prosperity. It also contributes to the discussion of democracy in the newly freed lands of Eurasia and the developing world and to the gathering debate about how to revitalize democracy in America.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691037387
Other:
Putnam, Robert D.
Other:
Leonardi, Robert
Author:
Cram101 Textbook Reviews
Author:
Putnam, Robert D.
Author:
Putnam
Author:
Leonardi, Robert
Author:
All Material Written by Cram101, Materia
Author:
Nanetti, Raffaella Y.
Author:
Cram 101
Author:
Cram 101
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, N.J.
Subject:
General
Subject:
Italy
Subject:
Government and political science
Subject:
U.S. Government
Subject:
Democracy
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Regionalism
Subject:
Decentralization in government
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
History & Theory
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Subject:
Education-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
176
Publication Date:
May 1994
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
9.20x6.09x.69 in. .85 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. A Picture Book of George Washington... New Trade Paper $7.99
  2. Cutting for Sign (Vintage Departures) New Trade Paper $19.00
  3. Dissonance of Democracy: Listening,... New Trade Paper $36.75
  4. Now Discover Your Strengths Used Trade Paper $8.50
  5. A Picture Book of Abraham Lincoln... New Trade Paper $7.99
  6. Running Through Walls: A Streetsmart... Used Hardcover $9.95

Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Archaeology » General
History and Social Science » Europe » Italy » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » World History » European History General
History and Social Science » World History » Italy
Textbooks » General

Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$47.95 In Stock
Product details 280 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691037387 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , This text offers empirical evidence for the importance of "civic community" in developing successful institutions. Its focus is on an experiment begun in 1970 when Italy created new governments for each of its regions.
"Synopsis" by , Why do some democratic governments succeed and others fail? In a world full of hope for democratization but wary of government failure, this book offers empirical evidence for the importance of civic community in developing successful institutions. As part of a unique experiment begun in 1970 when Italy created new governments for each of its regions - regions that vary greatly from the standpoint of wealth, social structure, and political leanings - Robert Putnam and his collaborators spent two decades evaluating the performance of these governments in such fields as agriculture, housing, and health services. Their findings were surprising: regions that enjoy effective government in the 1990s have inherited a legacy of civic engagement that can be traced back to the early Middle Ages. Just as Tocqueville traveled to America to try to understand democracy, Putnam and his colleagues draw broad lessons for democratic theory from their twenty-year journey through Italy. Their conclusions challenge the simple-minded thesis of the primacy of economics and the easy optimism of social engineers. Based on dozens of case studies and thousands of interviews with politicians, community leaders, and ordinary citizens, this book illuminates patterns of associationism, trust, and cooperation that facilitate good governance and economic prosperity. It also contributes to the discussion of democracy in the newly freed lands of Eurasia and the developing world and to the gathering debate about how to revitalize democracy in America.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.