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Original Essays | April 11, 2014

Paul Laudiero: IMG Shit Rough Draft



I was sitting in a British and Irish romantic drama class my last semester in college when the idea for Shit Rough Drafts hit me. I was working... Continue »
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9 Local Warehouse Christianity- Social Issues
6 Remote Warehouse Christianity- Theology and Ethics

Should We Live Forever?: The Ethical Ambiguities of Aging

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Should We Live Forever?: The Ethical Ambiguities of Aging Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Review:

"Meilaender (Neither Beast nor God) addresses aging like a tutor in a Tudor library, the fire embering in the grate. For this brief study, he speaks conversationally and in the manner of a well-read master: 'We need to think about how to think about growing old.' Meilaender analyzes age-retardation from three competing angles: humans are finite organisms; humans are distinguished from other organisms by freedom and reason; and humans are marked by ecstasy, that is, drawn out of themselves toward God. In six chapters, the theologian and ethicist explores transitional humanity, living forever, and a generative life. He writes eloquently on an unexpected topic: patience. Throughout, he offers his own witty opinions and quotes widely, from experts on aging, such as Erik Erikson and Margaret Urban Walker, but also from philosopher Martha Nussbaum, Christian apologist C.S. Lewis, and poet John Hall Wheelock. After the tutorial, Meilaender offers an afterword seminar — an imagined conversation — for three voices, each representing a different viewpoint on his argument, then ends on a note of eternal youth. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780802868695
Author:
Meilaender, Gilbert
Publisher:
William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company
Subject:
Sociology-Aging
Subject:
Christianity-Social Issues
Publication Date:
20130131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Sociology » Aging
Humanities » Philosophy » Ethics
Religion » Christianity » Christian Life » Social Issues
Religion » Christianity » Theology and Ethics
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Should We Live Forever?: The Ethical Ambiguities of Aging New Trade Paper
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Product details pages William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company - English 9780802868695 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Meilaender (Neither Beast nor God) addresses aging like a tutor in a Tudor library, the fire embering in the grate. For this brief study, he speaks conversationally and in the manner of a well-read master: 'We need to think about how to think about growing old.' Meilaender analyzes age-retardation from three competing angles: humans are finite organisms; humans are distinguished from other organisms by freedom and reason; and humans are marked by ecstasy, that is, drawn out of themselves toward God. In six chapters, the theologian and ethicist explores transitional humanity, living forever, and a generative life. He writes eloquently on an unexpected topic: patience. Throughout, he offers his own witty opinions and quotes widely, from experts on aging, such as Erik Erikson and Margaret Urban Walker, but also from philosopher Martha Nussbaum, Christian apologist C.S. Lewis, and poet John Hall Wheelock. After the tutorial, Meilaender offers an afterword seminar — an imagined conversation — for three voices, each representing a different viewpoint on his argument, then ends on a note of eternal youth. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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