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1 Burnside Environmental Studies- General

Recovering a Lost River: Removing Dams, Rewilding Salmon, Revitalizing Communities

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Recovering a Lost River: Removing Dams, Rewilding Salmon, Revitalizing Communities Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A powerful argument for why dam removal makes good scientific, economic, and environmental sense—and requires our urgent attention

 

In the Pacific Northwest, the Snake River and its wilderness tributaries were once some of the world’s greatest salmon rivers. As recently as a half century ago, they retained some of their historic bounty, with millions of fish returning to spawn. Now, due to four federal dams, the salmon population has dropped close to extinction. Efforts at salmon recovery through fish ladders, hatcheries, and even trucking them over the dams have failed.

 

Steven Hawley, journalist and self-proclaimed “river rat,” argues that the best hope for the Snake River lies in dam removal, a solution that pits the power authorities and Army Corps of Engineers against a collection of Indian tribes, farmers, fishermen, and river recreationists. The river’s health, as he demonstrates, is closely connected to local economies, fresh water rights, energy independence—and even the health of orca whales in Puget Sound.

 

The story of the Snake River, its salmon, and its people raises the fundamental questions of who should exercise control over natural resources and which interests should receive highest priority. It also offers surprising counterpoints to the notion of hydropower as a cheap, green, and reliable source of energy, and challenges the wisdom of heavily subsidized water and electricity.

 

This regional battle is part of an ambitious river restoration movement that stretches across the country from Maine’s Kennebec to California’s Klamath, and engages citizens from a broad social spectrum. In one successful project, the salmon of Butte Creek rebounded from a paltry fourteen fish to twenty thousand within just a few years of rewilding their river, showing the incredible resiliency of nature when given the slightest chance.

 

Recovering a Lost River depicts the compelling arguments and actions being made on behalf of salmon by a growing army of river warriors. Their message, persistent but disarmingly simple, is that all salmon need is water in their rivers, and a clear way home. 

From the Hardcover edition.

Synopsis:

US

Synopsis:

In the Pacific Northwest, the Snake River and its wilderness tributaries were—as recently as a half century ago—some of the world’s greatest salmon rivers. Now, due to four federal dams, the salmon population has dropped close to extinction. Steven Hawley, journalist and self-proclaimed “river rat,” argues that the best hope for the Snake River lies in dam removal, a solution that pits the power companies and federal authorities against a collection of Indian tribes, farmers, fishermen, and river recreationists. The river’s health, as he demonstrates, is closely connected to local economies, freshwater rights, and energy independence. Challenging the notion of hydropower as a cheap, green source of energy, Hawley depicts the efforts being made on behalf of salmon by a growing army of river warriors. Their message, persistent but disarmingly simple, is that all salmon need is water in their rivers and a clear way home.

About the Author

An environmental journalist, Steven Hawley was among the first to write about the historic agreement to tear out Edwards Dam on the Kennebec in Maine. Since then, his work has appeared in High Country News, the Bear Deluxe, National Fisherman, Onearth, Arizona Quarterly, and the Missoula Independent. He lives with his family along the Columbia River.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Prologue

1) Redeeming the Dammed

2) What They’re Smoking in Alaska this Summer

3) Feed Willy

4) Butte Creek

5) Energy Versus Eternal Delight

6) How the Mighty Were Felled

7) When the Levee Breaks

8) The Fifth H

9) Lies, Dam Lies, and Statistics: The Science of Saving Big Hydro

10) A River Resuscitated

11) The Heart of the Monster

Epilogue The River Why Not

Afterword

Acknowledgments

Notes

Sources

Product Details

ISBN:
9780807004739
Author:
Hawley, Steven
Publisher:
Beacon Press (MA)
Subject:
Rivers
Subject:
Oceanography-Fish
Subject:
Nature Studies-Biology
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20120331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
8.6 x 5.5 x 0.8 in 0.8213 lb

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Recovering a Lost River: Removing Dams, Rewilding Salmon, Revitalizing Communities Used Trade Paper
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Product details 280 pages Beacon Press - English 9780807004739 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , US
"Synopsis" by , In the Pacific Northwest, the Snake River and its wilderness tributaries were—as recently as a half century ago—some of the world’s greatest salmon rivers. Now, due to four federal dams, the salmon population has dropped close to extinction. Steven Hawley, journalist and self-proclaimed “river rat,” argues that the best hope for the Snake River lies in dam removal, a solution that pits the power companies and federal authorities against a collection of Indian tribes, farmers, fishermen, and river recreationists. The river’s health, as he demonstrates, is closely connected to local economies, freshwater rights, and energy independence. Challenging the notion of hydropower as a cheap, green source of energy, Hawley depicts the efforts being made on behalf of salmon by a growing army of river warriors. Their message, persistent but disarmingly simple, is that all salmon need is water in their rivers and a clear way home.

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