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1 Burnside Africa- Liberia
9 Local Warehouse World History- General
25 Remote Warehouse World History- General

This title in other editions

Another America: The Story of Liberia and the Former Slaves Who Ruled It

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Another America: The Story of Liberia and the Former Slaves Who Ruled It Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The first popular history of the former American slaves who founded, ruled, and lost Africas first republic

In 1820, a small group of African Americans reversed the course of centuries and sailed to Africa, to a place they would name after liberty itself. They went under the aegis of the American Colonization Society, a white philanthropic organization with a dual agenda: to rid America of its blacks and to evangelize Africa. The settlers, eventually numbering in the thousands, broke free from the ACS and, in 1847, established the Republic of Liberia.

    James Ciment, in his enthralling history Another America, shows that the settlers struggled to balance their high ideals with their prejudices. On the steamy shores of West Africa, they re-created the only social order they knew, that of an antebellum Dixie, with themselves as the master caste, ruling over a native population that outnumbered them twenty to one. They built plantations, held elegant dances, and worked to protect their fragile independence from the predations of foreign powers. Meanwhile, they fought, abused, and even helped to enslave the native Liberians. The persecuted became the persecutors—until a lowly native sergeant murdered their president in 1980, ending 133 years of Americo-Liberian rule and inaugurating a quarter century of civil war.

    Riven by caste, committed to commerce, practicing democratic and Christian ideals haphazardly, the Americo-Liberians created a history that is, to a surprising degree, the mirror image of our own.

Review:

"Few in the U.S. could identify Liberia on a map, but the two nations' histories are inextricably intertwined. Founded in 1822 as a colony for African-Americans returning to Africa, Liberia was created in the image of the U.S., and the former slaves and free blacks who moved there, driven by idealism or by poverty, 'endeavored to recreate the only social and political order they knew, that of the antebellum South — with themselves as the master class.' Ciment (Atlas of African-American History) paints a vivid picture of the challenges faced by the settlers: although supported by the U.S., formal recognition of their independence was delayed by nearly two decades due to American diplomatic society's refusal to host a black ambassador. Riven by troubled relations with the native population and familiar racial baggage — natives railed against 'a small, light-skinned elite work against the will of the black masses' — the settlers nevertheless resisted foreign invasion and maintained control of the country for over 130 years, before a bloody coup ushered in decades of violence. Enlivened by profiles of some of the early settlers, this is an engaging and accessible account whose only shortcoming is its failure to discuss the implications of Nobel Peace Prize — winner Ellen Johnson Sirleaf's election to the presidency in 2011." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

James Ciment is an independent scholar and the author of reference books on African American history, the New Deal, colonial America, and jazz. He lives in Los Angeles.

Table of Contents

Map xi

Preface xiii

 1. The Black Mayflower 3

 2. Original Sin 27

 3. First Families and Fresh Graves 53
 4. Africas Lone Star 77 
 5. A Matter of Color 99 
 6. The African Banquet 121 
 7. Conquering Hero 145 
 8. The Slave Ring 169 
 9. The Original African Big Man 189
10. Father and Son 223
Epilogue 247
Notes 259

Acknowledgments 279

Index 283

Product Details

ISBN:
9780809095421
Author:
Ciment, James
Publisher:
Hill & Wang
Author:
James Ciment
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
World History-General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20130831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 Pages of Black-and-White Illustration
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb

Related Subjects

Children's » General
History and Social Science » Africa » General
History and Social Science » Africa » Liberia
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » Sociology » Slavery
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » World History » Africa
History and Social Science » World History » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Another America: The Story of Liberia and the Former Slaves Who Ruled It New Hardcover
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Product details 320 pages Hill & Wang - English 9780809095421 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Few in the U.S. could identify Liberia on a map, but the two nations' histories are inextricably intertwined. Founded in 1822 as a colony for African-Americans returning to Africa, Liberia was created in the image of the U.S., and the former slaves and free blacks who moved there, driven by idealism or by poverty, 'endeavored to recreate the only social and political order they knew, that of the antebellum South — with themselves as the master class.' Ciment (Atlas of African-American History) paints a vivid picture of the challenges faced by the settlers: although supported by the U.S., formal recognition of their independence was delayed by nearly two decades due to American diplomatic society's refusal to host a black ambassador. Riven by troubled relations with the native population and familiar racial baggage — natives railed against 'a small, light-skinned elite work against the will of the black masses' — the settlers nevertheless resisted foreign invasion and maintained control of the country for over 130 years, before a bloody coup ushered in decades of violence. Enlivened by profiles of some of the early settlers, this is an engaging and accessible account whose only shortcoming is its failure to discuss the implications of Nobel Peace Prize — winner Ellen Johnson Sirleaf's election to the presidency in 2011." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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