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Culture and Catastrophe: German and Jewish Confrontations with National Socialism and Other Crises

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Our understandings of culture and of the catastrophe unleashed by National Socialism have always been regarded as interrelated. For all its brutality, Nazism always spoke in the name of the great German tradition, often using such high culture to justify atrocities committed. Were not such actions necessary for the defense of classical cultural values and ideal images against the polluted, degenerate groups who sought to sully and defile them?

Ironically, some of National Socialism's victims confronted and interpreted their experiences precisely through this prism of culture and catastrophe. Many of these victims had traditionally regarded Germany as a major civilizing force. In fact, from the late eighteenth century on, German Jews had constructed themselves in German culture's image. Many of the German-speaking Jewish intellectuals who became victims of National Socialism had been raised and completely absorbed in the German humanistic tradition.

Steven E. Aschheim here engages the multiple aspects of German and German-Jewish cultural history which touch upon the intricate interplay between culture and catastrophe, providing insights into the relationship between German culture and the origins, dispositions, and aftermath of National Socialism. He analyzes the designation of Nazism as part of the West's cultural code representing an absolute standard of evil, and sheds light on the problematics of current German, Jewish, and Israeli inscriptions of Nazism and its atrocities.

Synopsis:

Since 1976, over forty percent of prisoners executed in American jails have been African American or Hispanic. This trend shows little evidence of diminishing, and follows a larger pattern of the violent criminalization of African American populations that has marked the country's history of punishment.

In a bold attempt to tackle the looming question of how and why the connection between race and the death penalty has been so strong throughout American history, Ogletree and Sarat headline an interdisciplinary cast of experts in reflecting on this disturbing issue. Insightful original essays approach the topic from legal, historical, cultural, and social science perspectives to show the ways that the death penalty is racialized, the places in the death penalty process where race makes a difference, and the ways that meanings of race in the United States are constructed in and through our practices of capital punishment.

From Lynch Mobs to the Killing State not only uncovers the ways that race influences capital punishment, but also attempts to situate the linkage between race and the death penalty in the history of this country, in particular the history of lynching. In its probing examination of how and why the connection between race and the death penalty has been so strong throughout American history, this book forces us to consider how the death penalty gives meaning to race as well as why the racialization of the death penalty is uniquely American.

Synopsis:

Our understandings of culture and of the catastrophe unleashed by National Socialism have always been regarded as interrelated. For all its brutality, Nazism always spoke in the name of the great German tradition, often using such high culture to justify atrocities committed. Were not such actions necessary for the defense of classical cultural values and ideal images against the polluted, degenerate groups who sought to sully and defile them?

Ironically, some of National Socialism's victims confronted and interpreted their experiences precisely through this prism of culture and catastrophe. Many of these victims had traditionally regarded Germany as a major civilizing force. In fact, from the late eighteenth century on, German Jews had constructed themselves in German culture's image. Many of the German-speaking Jewish intellectuals who became victims of National Socialism had been raised and completely absorbed in the German humanistic tradition.

Steven E. Aschheim here engages the multiple aspects of German and German-Jewish cultural history which touch upon the intricate interplay between culture and catastrophe, providing insights into the relationship between German culture and the origins, dispositions, and aftermath of National Socialism. He analyzes the designation of Nazism as part of the West's cultural code representing an absolute standard of evil, and sheds light on the problematics of current German, Jewish, and Israeli inscriptions of Nazism and its atrocities.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references(p. 136-205) and index.

About the Author

Steven E. Ascheim is Associate Professor of History, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and the author of Brothers and Strangers: The East European Jew in German and German-Jewish Consciousness, 1800-1923 and The Nietzsche Legacy in Germany, 1890-1990. Currently he is on sabbatical at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814706428
Subtitle:
German and Jewish Confrontations With National Socialism and Other Crises
Author:
Aschheim, Steven E.
Editor:
Aschheim, Steven
Author:
Jensen, Robert W.
Author:
Ogletree, Jr., Charles
Author:
Aschheim, Steven
Author:
Jr., Charles Ogletree
Author:
Jensen, Robert
Author:
Sarat, Austin
Publisher:
NYU Press
Location:
New York :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Ethnology
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Jews
Subject:
Europe - Germany
Subject:
Germany
Subject:
Holocaust, jewish (1939-1945)
Subject:
Ethnic relations
Subject:
Disasters
Subject:
Holocaust, jewish
Subject:
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Historiography.
Subject:
Modern
Subject:
Nietzsche, friedrich wilhelm, 1844-1900
Subject:
BROCH, HERMANN, 1886-1951
Subject:
Arendt, hannah, 1906-1975
Subject:
JEWS_GERMANY
Subject:
JEWS_INTELLECTUAL LIFE
Subject:
GERMANY_ETHNIC RELATIONS
Subject:
HUMAN BEINGS_EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON
Subject:
JEWISH STUDIES_GERMANY
Subject:
FASCISM AND NAZISM_GERMANY
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm
Subject:
World History-Germany
Subject:
Discrimination
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
103-646
Publication Date:
19971201
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » Germany » General

Culture and Catastrophe: German and Jewish Confrontations with National Socialism and Other Crises New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$32.50 Backorder
Product details 288 pages New York University Press - English 9780814706428 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Since 1976, over forty percent of prisoners executed in American jails have been African American or Hispanic. This trend shows little evidence of diminishing, and follows a larger pattern of the violent criminalization of African American populations that has marked the country's history of punishment.

In a bold attempt to tackle the looming question of how and why the connection between race and the death penalty has been so strong throughout American history, Ogletree and Sarat headline an interdisciplinary cast of experts in reflecting on this disturbing issue. Insightful original essays approach the topic from legal, historical, cultural, and social science perspectives to show the ways that the death penalty is racialized, the places in the death penalty process where race makes a difference, and the ways that meanings of race in the United States are constructed in and through our practices of capital punishment.

From Lynch Mobs to the Killing State not only uncovers the ways that race influences capital punishment, but also attempts to situate the linkage between race and the death penalty in the history of this country, in particular the history of lynching. In its probing examination of how and why the connection between race and the death penalty has been so strong throughout American history, this book forces us to consider how the death penalty gives meaning to race as well as why the racialization of the death penalty is uniquely American.

"Synopsis" by , Our understandings of culture and of the catastrophe unleashed by National Socialism have always been regarded as interrelated. For all its brutality, Nazism always spoke in the name of the great German tradition, often using such high culture to justify atrocities committed. Were not such actions necessary for the defense of classical cultural values and ideal images against the polluted, degenerate groups who sought to sully and defile them?

Ironically, some of National Socialism's victims confronted and interpreted their experiences precisely through this prism of culture and catastrophe. Many of these victims had traditionally regarded Germany as a major civilizing force. In fact, from the late eighteenth century on, German Jews had constructed themselves in German culture's image. Many of the German-speaking Jewish intellectuals who became victims of National Socialism had been raised and completely absorbed in the German humanistic tradition.

Steven E. Aschheim here engages the multiple aspects of German and German-Jewish cultural history which touch upon the intricate interplay between culture and catastrophe, providing insights into the relationship between German culture and the origins, dispositions, and aftermath of National Socialism. He analyzes the designation of Nazism as part of the West's cultural code representing an absolute standard of evil, and sheds light on the problematics of current German, Jewish, and Israeli inscriptions of Nazism and its atrocities.

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