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Children in Colonial America (06 Edition)

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Children in Colonial America (06 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

As banks crashed, belts tightened, and cupboards emptied across the country, American prisons grew fat. Doing Time in the Depression tells the story of the 1930s as seen from the cell blocks and cotton fields of Texas and California prisons, state institutions that held growing numbers of working people from around the country and the world--overwhelmingly poor, disproportionately non-white, and displaced by economic crisis.

Ethan Blue paints a vivid portrait of everyday life inside Texas and Californias penal systems. Each element of prison life--from numbing boredom to hard labor, from meager pleasure in popular culture to crushing pain from illness or violence--demonstrated a contest between keepers and the kept. From the moment they arrived to the day they would leave, inmates struggled over the meanings of race and manhood, power and poverty, and of the state itself. In this richly layered account, Blue compellingly argues that punishment in California and Texas played a critical role in producing a distinctive set of class, race, and gender identities in the 1930s, some of which reinforced the social hierarchies and ideologies of New Deal America, and others of which undercut and troubled the established social order. He reveals the underside of the modern state in two very different prison systems, and the making of grim institutions whose power would only grow across the century.

Synopsis:

View the Table of Contents .nbsp; nbsp; nbsp; Read the Introduction . Providing fresh historical perspectives on key features of children's lives, this book offers compelling, new materials on childhood in colonial America, and on groups— including Native Americans and Hispanics— too often left out of conventional coverage. — Peter Stearns, George Mason University Children in Colonial Americais a highly original contribution to the history of childhood. The collection's unique strength lies in its great range of regions and peoples represented: from Indian children of Mexico to young Africans in Jamaica, from Separatist Pilgrims in the Netherlands and Plymouth to Catholic girls in Germany, Louisiana, and Pennsylvania. Although ideal for the classroom, these essays offer much that will be of interest to seasoned scholars. — Gloria L. Main, University of Colorado-Boulder The Pilgrims and Puritans did not arrive on the shores of New England alone. Nor did African men and women, brought to the Americas as slaves. Though it would be hard to tell from the historical record, European colonists and African slaves had children, as did the indigenous families whom they encountered, and those children's life experiences enrich and complicate our understanding of colonial America. Through essays, primary documents, and contemporary illustrations, Children in Colonial Americaexamines the unique aspects of childhood in the American colonies between the late sixteenth and late eighteenth centuries. The twelve original essays observe a diverse cross-section of children— from indigenous peoples of the east coast and Mexico to Dutch-born children of the Plymouth colony andAfrican-born offspring of slaves in the Caribbean— and explore themes including parenting and childrearing practices, children's health and education, sibling relations, child abuse, mental health, gender, play, and rites of passage. Taken together, the essays and documents inChildren in Colonial Americashed light on the ways in which the process of colonization shaped childhood, and in turn how the experience of children affected life in colonial America.

Synopsis:

The Pilgrims and Puritans did not arrive on the shores of New England alone. Nor did African men and women, brought to the Americas as slaves. Though it would be hard to tell from the historical record, European colonists and African slaves had children, as did the indigenous families whom they encountered, and those children's life experiences enrich and complicate our understanding of colonial America.

Through essays, primary documents, and contemporary illustrations, Children in Colonial America examines the unique aspects of childhood in the American colonies between the late sixteenth and late eighteenth centuries. The twelve original essays observe a diverse cross-section of children—from indigenous peoples of the east coast and Mexico to Dutch-born children of the Plymouth colony and African-born offspring of slaves in the Caribbean—and explore themes including parenting and childrearing practices, children's health and education, sibling relations, child abuse, mental health, gender, play, and rites of passage.

Taken together, the essays and documents in Children in Colonial America shed light on the ways in which the process of colonization shaped childhood, and in turn how the experience of children affected life in colonial America.

About the Author

James Marten is professor and chair of the history department at Marquette University. His books include The Children's Civil War as well as the edited anthologies, Children in Colonial America and Children and War: A Historical Anthology, both published by NYU Press.

Philip J. Greven is professor emeritus at Rutgers University and author of The Protestant Temperament: Patterns of Child-rearing, Religious Experience, and the Self in Early America, among others.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814757161
Author:
Marten, James
Publisher:
New York University Press
Foreword by:
Greven, Philip J.
Foreword:
Greven, Philip J.
Contribution:
Greven, Philip J.
Author:
Blue, Ethan
Author:
Greven, Philip J.
Subject:
General
Subject:
Children's Studies
Subject:
History
Subject:
Children
Subject:
United States - Colonial Period
Subject:
United States Social life and customs.
Subject:
United States Social conditions To 1865.
Subject:
United States / Colonial Period(1600-1775)
Subject:
US History-Colonial America
Subject:
United States - General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Children and Youth in America
Publication Date:
20061231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
History and Social Science » US History » Colonial America

Children in Colonial America (06 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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$21.00 In Stock
Product details 288 pages New York University Press - English 9780814757161 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , View the Table of Contents .nbsp; nbsp; nbsp; Read the Introduction . Providing fresh historical perspectives on key features of children's lives, this book offers compelling, new materials on childhood in colonial America, and on groups— including Native Americans and Hispanics— too often left out of conventional coverage. — Peter Stearns, George Mason University Children in Colonial Americais a highly original contribution to the history of childhood. The collection's unique strength lies in its great range of regions and peoples represented: from Indian children of Mexico to young Africans in Jamaica, from Separatist Pilgrims in the Netherlands and Plymouth to Catholic girls in Germany, Louisiana, and Pennsylvania. Although ideal for the classroom, these essays offer much that will be of interest to seasoned scholars. — Gloria L. Main, University of Colorado-Boulder The Pilgrims and Puritans did not arrive on the shores of New England alone. Nor did African men and women, brought to the Americas as slaves. Though it would be hard to tell from the historical record, European colonists and African slaves had children, as did the indigenous families whom they encountered, and those children's life experiences enrich and complicate our understanding of colonial America. Through essays, primary documents, and contemporary illustrations, Children in Colonial Americaexamines the unique aspects of childhood in the American colonies between the late sixteenth and late eighteenth centuries. The twelve original essays observe a diverse cross-section of children— from indigenous peoples of the east coast and Mexico to Dutch-born children of the Plymouth colony andAfrican-born offspring of slaves in the Caribbean— and explore themes including parenting and childrearing practices, children's health and education, sibling relations, child abuse, mental health, gender, play, and rites of passage. Taken together, the essays and documents inChildren in Colonial Americashed light on the ways in which the process of colonization shaped childhood, and in turn how the experience of children affected life in colonial America.
"Synopsis" by , The Pilgrims and Puritans did not arrive on the shores of New England alone. Nor did African men and women, brought to the Americas as slaves. Though it would be hard to tell from the historical record, European colonists and African slaves had children, as did the indigenous families whom they encountered, and those children's life experiences enrich and complicate our understanding of colonial America.

Through essays, primary documents, and contemporary illustrations, Children in Colonial America examines the unique aspects of childhood in the American colonies between the late sixteenth and late eighteenth centuries. The twelve original essays observe a diverse cross-section of children—from indigenous peoples of the east coast and Mexico to Dutch-born children of the Plymouth colony and African-born offspring of slaves in the Caribbean—and explore themes including parenting and childrearing practices, children's health and education, sibling relations, child abuse, mental health, gender, play, and rites of passage.

Taken together, the essays and documents in Children in Colonial America shed light on the ways in which the process of colonization shaped childhood, and in turn how the experience of children affected life in colonial America.

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