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Lynching in America: A History in Documents

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Lynching in America: A History in Documents Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Whether conveyed through newspapers, photographs, or Billie Hollidays haunting song “Strange Fruit,” lynching has immediate and graphic connotations for all who hear the word. Images of lynching are generally unambiguous: black victims hanging from trees, often surrounded by gawking white mobs. While this picture of lynching tells a distressingly familiar story about mob violence in America, it is not the full story. Lynching in America presents the most comprehensive portrait of lynching to date, demonstrating that while lynching has always been present in American society, it has been anything but one-dimensional.

Ranging from personal correspondence to courtroom transcripts to journalistic accounts, Christopher Waldrep has extensively mined an enormous quantity of documents about lynching, which he arranges chronologically with concise introductions. He reveals that lynching has been part of American history since the Revolution, but its victims, perpetrators, causes, and environments have changed over time. From the American Revolution to the expansion of the western frontier, Waldrep shows how communities defended lynching as a way to maintain law and order. Slavery, the Civil War, and especially Reconstruction marked the ascendancy of racialized lynching in the nineteenth century, which has continued to the present day, with the murder of James Byrd in Jasper, Texas, and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomass contention that he was lynched by Congress at his confirmation hearings.

Since its founding, lynching has permeated American social, political, and cultural life, and no other book documents American lynching with historical texts offering firsthand accounts of lynchings, explanations, excuses, and criticism.

Synopsis:

Past Imperfect is a forthright and uncommonly damning study of those intellectually volatile years [1944-1956]. Mr. Judt...does more than simply describe the ideological acrobats of his subjects; he is a sharp, even a vindictive moralist who indicts these intellectuals for their inhumanity in failing to test their political thought against political reality.”

-John Sturrock, New York Times Book Review

Synopsis:

Whether conveyed through newspapers, photographs, or Billie Holliday's haunting song Strange Fruit, lynching has immediate and graphic connotations for all who hear the word. Images of lynching are generally unambiguous: black victims hanging from trees, often surrounded by gawking white mobs. While this picture of lynching tells a distressingly familiar story about mob violence in America, it is not the full story. Lynching in America presents the most comprehensive portrait of lynching to date, demonstrating that while lynching has always been present in American society, it has been anything but one-dimensional.

Ranging from personal correspondence to courtroom transcripts to journalistic accounts, Christopher Waldrep has extensively mined an enormous quantity of documents about lynching, which he arranges chronologically with concise introductions. He reveals that lynching has been part of American history since the Revolution, but its victims, perpetrators, causes, and environments have changed over time. From the American Revolution to the expansion of the western frontier, Waldrep shows how communities defended lynching as a way to maintain law and order. Slavery, the Civil War, and especially Reconstruction marked the ascendancy of racialized lynching in the nineteenth century, which has continued to the present day, with the murder of James Byrd in Jasper, Texas, and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas's contention that he was lynched by Congress at his confirmation hearings.

Since its founding, lynching has permeated American social, political, and cultural life, and no other book documents American lynching with historical texts offering firsthand accounts of lynchings, explanations, excuses, and criticism.

About the Author

Christopher Waldrep is Jamie and Phyllis Pasker Professor of History, San Francisco State University. He is the author of Night Riders: Defending Community in the Black Patch: 1890-1915, Roots of Disorder: Race and Criminal Justice in the American South, 1817-1880, and The Many Faces of Judge Lynch: Extralegal Violence and Punishment in America.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814793992
Subtitle:
A History in Documents
Editor:
Waldrep, Christopher
Editor:
Waldrep, Christopher
Author:
Waldrep, Christopher
Author:
Judt, Tony
Publisher:
NYU Press
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
Lynching
Subject:
Violence in Society
Subject:
Lynching -- United States -- History.
Subject:
General History
Subject:
US History-General
Subject:
France
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20060101
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
281
Dimensions:
10 x 7 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Crime » Criminology
History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime
History and Social Science » Sociology » Violence in Society
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Lynching in America: A History in Documents New Trade Paper
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$35.95 Backorder
Product details 281 pages New York University Press - English 9780814793992 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Past Imperfect is a forthright and uncommonly damning study of those intellectually volatile years [1944-1956]. Mr. Judt...does more than simply describe the ideological acrobats of his subjects; he is a sharp, even a vindictive moralist who indicts these intellectuals for their inhumanity in failing to test their political thought against political reality.”

-John Sturrock, New York Times Book Review

"Synopsis" by , Whether conveyed through newspapers, photographs, or Billie Holliday's haunting song Strange Fruit, lynching has immediate and graphic connotations for all who hear the word. Images of lynching are generally unambiguous: black victims hanging from trees, often surrounded by gawking white mobs. While this picture of lynching tells a distressingly familiar story about mob violence in America, it is not the full story. Lynching in America presents the most comprehensive portrait of lynching to date, demonstrating that while lynching has always been present in American society, it has been anything but one-dimensional.

Ranging from personal correspondence to courtroom transcripts to journalistic accounts, Christopher Waldrep has extensively mined an enormous quantity of documents about lynching, which he arranges chronologically with concise introductions. He reveals that lynching has been part of American history since the Revolution, but its victims, perpetrators, causes, and environments have changed over time. From the American Revolution to the expansion of the western frontier, Waldrep shows how communities defended lynching as a way to maintain law and order. Slavery, the Civil War, and especially Reconstruction marked the ascendancy of racialized lynching in the nineteenth century, which has continued to the present day, with the murder of James Byrd in Jasper, Texas, and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas's contention that he was lynched by Congress at his confirmation hearings.

Since its founding, lynching has permeated American social, political, and cultural life, and no other book documents American lynching with historical texts offering firsthand accounts of lynchings, explanations, excuses, and criticism.

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