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Mexican Cinema / Mexican Woman, 1940-1950 (96 Edition)

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Mexican Cinema / Mexican Woman, 1940-1950 (96 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

The female image has been an ambiguous one in Mexican culture, and the place of women in Mexican cinema is no less tenuous--yielding in the films of Luis Buñuel and others a range of characterizations from virgin to whore, mother to femme fatale. Mexican Cinema/Mexican Woman, 1940-1950 examines a singular moment in the history of Mexican film to investigate the ways in which the cinematic figures of woman functioned to mediate narrative and social debates. The book raises new questions about the relations between woman and cinema. It will have broad appeal among students and scholars of film, feminist studies, and Latin American studies, as well as those interested in the popular culture of Mexico. Considering the historical and cultural representations of sexual difference as well as race and class, Hershfield closely examines the portrayal of women and gender identity in six films: María Candelaria (Emilio Fernández, 1943), Río Escondido (Emilio Fernández, 1947), Distinto amanecer (Julio Bracho, 1943), Salón México (Emilio Fernández, 1948), Doña Bárbara (Fernando de Fuentes, 1943), and Susana (Carne y demonio) (Luis Buñuel, 1950).

Synopsis:

The female image has been an ambiguous one in Mexican culture, and the place of women in Mexican cinema is no less tenuous--yielding in the films of Luis Buñuel and others a range of characterizations from virgin to whore, mother to femme fatale. Mexican Cinema/Mexican Woman, 1940-1950 examines a singular moment in the history of Mexican film to investigate the ways in which the cinematic figures of woman functioned to mediate narrative and social debates. The book raises new questions about the relations between woman and cinema. It will have broad appeal among students and scholars of film, feminist studies, and Latin American studies, as well as those interested in the popular culture of Mexico. Considering the historical and cultural representations of sexual difference as well as race and class, Hershfield closely examines the portrayal of women and gender identity in six films: María Candelaria (Emilio Fernández, 1943), Río Escondido (Emilio Fernández, 1947), Distinto amanecer (Julio Bracho, 1943), Salón México (Emilio Fernández, 1948), Doña Bárbara (Fernando de Fuentes, 1943), and Susana (Carne y demonio) (Luis Buñuel, 1950).

About the Author

Joanne Hershfield is an assistant professor of communication studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her articles on Mexican cinema have been published in Wide Angle and The Spectator: A Journal of Film and Television.

Table of Contents

The timeless paradox: mother and whore — Mexican cinema and the woman question — Cinema, woman, and national identity — The cinema of the cabaretera — La devoradora: the Mexican femme fatale.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780816516377
Author:
Hershfield, Joanne
Author:
Edrington
Author:
Curtus
Publisher:
University of Arizona Press
Location:
Tucson :
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Film - General
Subject:
Film - History & Criticism
Subject:
Performing arts
Subject:
Motion pictures
Subject:
Women in motion pictures
Subject:
Film & Video - History & Criticism
Subject:
Motion pictures -- Mexico -- History.
Subject:
Latin American Studies; Women s Studies
Subject:
Film and Television-History and Criticism
Subject:
Mexico
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
Latin American communication and popular culture
Series Volume:
SP-520
Publication Date:
19961101
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
159
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

» Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Ethnicity and Gender
» Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » General
» Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » History and Criticism
» Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » World Cinema
» History and Social Science » Economics » General
» History and Social Science » World History » General
» History and Social Science » World History » Mexico
» Science and Mathematics » Botany » General
» Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General
» Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Botany

Mexican Cinema / Mexican Woman, 1940-1950 (96 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 159 pages University of Arizona Press - English 9780816516377 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The female image has been an ambiguous one in Mexican culture, and the place of women in Mexican cinema is no less tenuous--yielding in the films of Luis Buñuel and others a range of characterizations from virgin to whore, mother to femme fatale. Mexican Cinema/Mexican Woman, 1940-1950 examines a singular moment in the history of Mexican film to investigate the ways in which the cinematic figures of woman functioned to mediate narrative and social debates. The book raises new questions about the relations between woman and cinema. It will have broad appeal among students and scholars of film, feminist studies, and Latin American studies, as well as those interested in the popular culture of Mexico. Considering the historical and cultural representations of sexual difference as well as race and class, Hershfield closely examines the portrayal of women and gender identity in six films: María Candelaria (Emilio Fernández, 1943), Río Escondido (Emilio Fernández, 1947), Distinto amanecer (Julio Bracho, 1943), Salón México (Emilio Fernández, 1948), Doña Bárbara (Fernando de Fuentes, 1943), and Susana (Carne y demonio) (Luis Buñuel, 1950).
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