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Devastating Losses: How Parents Cope with the Death of a Child to Suicide or Drugs

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Devastating Losses: How Parents Cope with the Death of a Child to Suicide or Drugs Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Grounded equally in solid clinical practice and uniquely relevant research, and tragically leavened by the personal bereavement of two of the book's authors, Devastating Losses sheds new and compassionate light on the experience of a child's death to traumatic causes. Robert A. Neimeyer, PhD Editor, Death Studies

This volume is a pioneering and long overdue work, a study not only of grieving parents who lost a child to suicide but also of parents whose children succumbed to drug overdoses. The authors have done a masterful job of blending their quantitative research findings and the anguished voices of parents attending survivor support groups to create a rich and very engaging book. Michael F Myers, MD

Co-Author, Touched by Suicide: Hope and Healing after Loss

This book fills a critical gap in our scientific understanding of the grief response of parents who have lost a child to traumatic death and the psychotherapeutic strategies that best facilitate healing. It is based on the results of the largest study ever conducted of parents surviving a child's traumatic death or suicide. The book was conceived by William and Beverly Feigelman following their own devastating loss of a son, and written from the perspective of their experiences as both suicide-survivor support group participants and facilitators. It intertwines data, insight, and critical learning gathered from research with the voices of the 575 survivors who participated in the study.

The text emphasizes the sociological underpinnings of survivors' grief and provides data that vividly documents their critical need for emotional support. It explains how bereavement difficulties can be exacerbated by stigmatization, and by the failure of significant others to provide expected support. Also explored in depth are the ways in which couples adapt to the traumatic loss of a child and how this can bring them closer or render their relationship irreparable. Findings suggest that with time and peer support affiliations, most traumatically bereaved parents ultimately demonstrate resilience and find meaningful new roles for themselves, helping the newly bereaved or engaging in other humanitarian acts. Key Features:

Offers researchers, clinicians, and parent-survivors current information on how parents adapt initially and over time after the traumatic loss of a child Presents data culled from the largest survey ever conducted (575 individuals) of parents surviving a child's suicide or other traumatic death Investigates the ways in which stigmatization complicates and prolongs the grieving process Addresses the tremendous value of support groups in the healing process Explores how married couples are affected by the traumatic loss of their child

Synopsis:

This volume fills a critical gap in our scientific understanding of the grief response of parents who have lost a child to traumatic death and the psychotherapeutic strategies that best facilitate healing. It is based on the results of the largest study ever conducted of parents surviving a child's traumatic death or suicide. The book was conceived by William and Beverly Feigelman following their own devastating loss of a son, and written from the perspective of their experiences as both suicide-survivor support group participants and facilitators. It intertwines data, insight, and critical learning gathered from research with the voices of the 574 survivors who participated in the study.

The text emphasizes the sociological underpinnings of survivor's grief and provides data that vividly documents the critical need for emotional support from family members, coworkers, and friends. It explains how bereavement difficulties can be exacerbated by failure of significant others to provide expected support, while membership in peer support groups and the long-term connections often made there greatly facilitate the healing process. The argument that various types of stigmatization complicate and prolong grieving is well documented. The book also focuses on the unique bereavement difficulties of parent survivors of drug overdose deaths and compares the stigmatization of these parents with that of survivors of other traumatic losses. Also explored are the ways in which couples adapt to the traumatic loss of a child and how this can bring them closer or render their relationship irreparable.Key Features:

Offers researchers, clinicians, and parent-survivors current information on how parents adapt after the traumatic loss of a childPresents data culled from the largest survey ever conducted (574 individuals) of parents surviving a child's suicide or other traumatic deathInvestigates the ways in which stigmatization complicates and prolongs the grieving processAddresses the tremendous value of support groups in the healing processExplores how married couples are affected by the traumatic loss of their childIdentifies the needs for mental health services among longer-term survivors

Product Details

ISBN:
9780826107466
Author:
Feigelman, William
Publisher:
Springer Publishing Company
Subject:
Self-Help; Grief
Subject:
Sociology - General
Publication Date:
20120631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Grief
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Suicide

Devastating Losses: How Parents Cope with the Death of a Child to Suicide or Drugs New Trade Paper
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Product details pages Springer Publishing Company - English 9780826107466 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , This volume fills a critical gap in our scientific understanding of the grief response of parents who have lost a child to traumatic death and the psychotherapeutic strategies that best facilitate healing. It is based on the results of the largest study ever conducted of parents surviving a child's traumatic death or suicide. The book was conceived by William and Beverly Feigelman following their own devastating loss of a son, and written from the perspective of their experiences as both suicide-survivor support group participants and facilitators. It intertwines data, insight, and critical learning gathered from research with the voices of the 574 survivors who participated in the study.

The text emphasizes the sociological underpinnings of survivor's grief and provides data that vividly documents the critical need for emotional support from family members, coworkers, and friends. It explains how bereavement difficulties can be exacerbated by failure of significant others to provide expected support, while membership in peer support groups and the long-term connections often made there greatly facilitate the healing process. The argument that various types of stigmatization complicate and prolong grieving is well documented. The book also focuses on the unique bereavement difficulties of parent survivors of drug overdose deaths and compares the stigmatization of these parents with that of survivors of other traumatic losses. Also explored are the ways in which couples adapt to the traumatic loss of a child and how this can bring them closer or render their relationship irreparable.Key Features:

Offers researchers, clinicians, and parent-survivors current information on how parents adapt after the traumatic loss of a childPresents data culled from the largest survey ever conducted (574 individuals) of parents surviving a child's suicide or other traumatic deathInvestigates the ways in which stigmatization complicates and prolongs the grieving processAddresses the tremendous value of support groups in the healing processExplores how married couples are affected by the traumatic loss of their childIdentifies the needs for mental health services among longer-term survivors

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