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Tucson Hiking Guide (Pruett)

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Tucson Hiking Guide (Pruett) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This rich, enthusiastic guide to the Tucson, Rincon, Santa Catalina, and Santa Rita Mountains has been completely revised. Betty Leavengoods fourth edition of her bestselling Tucson Hiking Guide offers new routes and updated access information, detailed maps, and clear descriptions to area trailheads. This latest edition includes thirty-six hikes rated easy to difficult by mountain range; revised information on precautions for desert hiking; historical notes, photographs, and anecdotes; and detailed maps and descriptions with elevation/distance.

Synopsis:

Tucson is a “hiker’s heaven.” To the north is the mountain range that dominates the Tucson skyline, the Santa Catalina range. Due east are the Rincons. Forty miles south of town are the Santa Rita Mountains. The Tucson Mountains to the west are the backdrop for our dramatic sunsets. Hiking is possible year round—the mild winters allow hiking in the lower elevations, and, in summer, the trails of the high mountains beckon.

To enjoy hiking in these mountains, you must be properly prepared and be aware of the hazards of hiking in this area. Too much exposure to the sun is dangerous. Not carrying enough water can result in serious illness or death. There are venomous creatures out there, such as rattlesnakes, scorpions, and Gila monsters. Cactus, amole, catclaw, and other thorny plants seem determined to attack you. Weather conditions can change quickly—what started out as a beautiful morning can become a storm by early afternoon.

Sounds bad! If you are properly prepared and aware of the dangers that exist, the chances of anything happening to you are remote. It is beautiful out there, and the only way you can see it is on your feet. Within a 45-mile radius of Tucson, the elevations go from 2,500 feet to nearly 10,000 feet. Vegetation changes from cactus to oak to ponderosa pine and Douglas fir. You may spot a javelina, coyote, deer, bighorn sheep, or in the highest elevations, even a bear. Hidden pools invite swimming on a hot day. The views extend seemingly forever or are limited by stark canyon walls.

This guide is intended to prepare you to hike in these mountains. The first chapter will discuss proper equipment and clothing for hiking here. The second chapter discusses what you should be aware of, such as too much sun, too little water, and those poisonous creatures. The rest of the guide is devoted to providing detailed descriptions of trails and is organized by mountain range.

About the Author

A longtime Tucson resident, Betty Leavengood now lives in Davidson, North Carolina.

Table of Contents

Preface vii

Introduction 1

Getting Ready 3

Hazards of Hiking Around Tucson 5

Trail Difficulty Ratings 11

The Tucson Mountains 13

Hugh Norris Trail 16

King Canyon Trail 22

Encinas Trail to Signal Hill 27

Sendero Esperanza Trail 32

Sweetwater Trail 37

Roadrunner–Panther Peak Wash–Cam-Boh Trail Loop 41

David Yetman Trail 46

Golden Gate Loop Trail 51

Brown Mountain Trail 57

Gilbert Ray Campground Loop Trail 62

The Rincon Mountains 67

Cactus Forest Trail 70

Pink Hill–Wentworth–Loma Verde Loop Trail 75

Tanque Verde Ridge Trail 82

Douglas Spring Trail 88

Rincon Peak Trail 93

The Santa Catalina Mountains 99

Agua Caliente Hill Trail 101

Blackett’s Ridge Trail 106

Esperero Trail 111

Ventana Canyon Trail 117

Pontatoc Ridge Trail 123

Finger Rock Trail 128

Pima Canyon Trail 134

Romero Canyon Trail 140

Prison Camp to Sabino Canyon Trail 145

Box Camp Trail 151

The Santa Rita Mountains 157

Old Baldy Trail 159

Super Trail 166

Kent Spring–Bog Springs Loop Trail 171

Dutch John Spring Trail 176

Agua Caliente (Vault Mine) Josephine Saddle Loop Trail 180

Elephant Head Hiking/Biking Trail 185

Agua Caliente Trail 191

Florida Saddle Trail 194

Arizona Trail–From Kentucky Camp to Gardner Canyon 199

Selected Readings 205

Index 207

Product Details

ISBN:
9780871089663
Author:
Leavengood, Betty
Publisher:
Westwinds Press
Subject:
Hiking
Subject:
Travel-US Western States
Subject:
Tuscon
Subject:
Trail Guide
Subject:
 Tuscon
Subject:
TRAVEL / United States / West / Mountain (AZ, CO, ID, MT, NM, NV, UT, WY)
Subject:
Arizona
Subject:
Sports & outdoor recreation
Edition Description:
Fourth Edition, Revised
Series:
The Pruett Series
Publication Date:
20130231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
112
Pages:
236
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects


» Sports and Outdoors » Outdoors » Camping and Hiking » General
» Sports and Outdoors » Outdoors » Camping and Hiking » Hiking » By State » General
» Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Walking
» Travel » North America » United States » Western States

Tucson Hiking Guide (Pruett) New Trade Paper
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$16.99 In Stock
Product details 236 pages Westwinds Press - English 9780871089663 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Tucson is a “hiker’s heaven.” To the north is the mountain range that dominates the Tucson skyline, the Santa Catalina range. Due east are the Rincons. Forty miles south of town are the Santa Rita Mountains. The Tucson Mountains to the west are the backdrop for our dramatic sunsets. Hiking is possible year round—the mild winters allow hiking in the lower elevations, and, in summer, the trails of the high mountains beckon.

To enjoy hiking in these mountains, you must be properly prepared and be aware of the hazards of hiking in this area. Too much exposure to the sun is dangerous. Not carrying enough water can result in serious illness or death. There are venomous creatures out there, such as rattlesnakes, scorpions, and Gila monsters. Cactus, amole, catclaw, and other thorny plants seem determined to attack you. Weather conditions can change quickly—what started out as a beautiful morning can become a storm by early afternoon.

Sounds bad! If you are properly prepared and aware of the dangers that exist, the chances of anything happening to you are remote. It is beautiful out there, and the only way you can see it is on your feet. Within a 45-mile radius of Tucson, the elevations go from 2,500 feet to nearly 10,000 feet. Vegetation changes from cactus to oak to ponderosa pine and Douglas fir. You may spot a javelina, coyote, deer, bighorn sheep, or in the highest elevations, even a bear. Hidden pools invite swimming on a hot day. The views extend seemingly forever or are limited by stark canyon walls.

This guide is intended to prepare you to hike in these mountains. The first chapter will discuss proper equipment and clothing for hiking here. The second chapter discusses what you should be aware of, such as too much sun, too little water, and those poisonous creatures. The rest of the guide is devoted to providing detailed descriptions of trails and is organized by mountain range.

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