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Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards (Encyclopedia of Earth Sciences)

Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards (Encyclopedia of Earth Sciences) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Fewer subjects have caught the attention of the entire world as much as those dealing with natural hazards. The human losses (some 225,000 people) associated with the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, the economic costs (exceeding 100 billion USD) of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the collective social impacts of tragedies experienced during the 2008 Sichuan, China earthquake and landslides, all provide repetitive reminders that we are all but temporary guests occupying a very dynamic planet. Few subjects share the true interdisciplinary dependency that characterizes the field of natural hazards. From geology and geophysics, to engineering and emergency response, to social psychology and economics, the study of natural hazards draws input from an impressive suite of unique and previously independent specializations. Natural hazards provide a common platform to reduce disciplinary boundaries and facilitate a beneficial synergy in the provision of timely and useful information on the critical subject matter. As social norms change regarding the concept of acceptable risk and human migration leads to an explosion in the number of megacities, coastal over-crowding and unmanaged habitation in precarious environments such as mountainous slopes, the vulnerability of people to natural hazards increases dramatically. Coupled with the concerns of changing climates, the subject of natural hazards remains on the forefront of issues that affect all people, nations and environments. In the first two months of 2010 alone a magnitude 7 earthquake near Port au Prince, Haiti killed an estimated 230,000 people, exposed the inadequacies of their infrastructure and emergency response capacity and virtually crippled an entire nation; whereas in contrast a month later a significantly larger magnitude 8.8 earthquake off the coast of Chile provided a sober lesson that those areas with a long history of exposure to natural hazards are indeed much more capable to cope with the consequences of unexpected events. The Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards effectively captures and integrates contributions from an international portfolio of specialists whose range of expertise addresses some 330 topics pertinent to the field of natural hazards. Disciplinary barriers are overcome in this comprehensive treatment of the subject matter. Clear illustrations and colour images enhance the primary aim to communicate and educate. The inclusion of a series of "classic case study" events interspersed throughout the volume provides tangible examples linking concepts, issues and solutions.

Synopsis:

Few subjects share the true interdisciplinary dependency that characterizes the field of natural hazards. The Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards effectively captures and integrates contributions from international specialists whose range of expertise address some 250 topics pertinent to the field of natural hazards.

Synopsis:

Few subjects have caught the attention of the entire world as much as those dealing with natural hazards. The human losses (some 225,000 people) associated with the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, the economic costs (exceeding 100 billion USD) of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the collective social impacts of tragedies experienced during the 2008 Sichuan, China earthquake and landslides, all provide repetitive reminders that we are all but temporary guests occupying a very dynamic planet. Few subjects share the true interdisciplinary dependency that characterizes the field of natural hazards. From geology and geophysics, to engineering and emergency response, to social psychology and economics, the study of natural hazards draws input from an impressive suite of unique and previously independent specializations. Natural hazards provide a common platform to reduce disciplinary boundaries and facilitate a beneficial synergy in the provision of timely and useful information on the critical subject matter.As social norms change regarding the concept of acceptable risk and human migration leads to an explosion in the number of megacities, coastal over-crowding and unmanaged habitation in precarious environments such as mountainous slopes, the vulnerability of people to natural hazards increases dramatically. Coupled with the concerns of changing climates, the subject of natural hazards remains on the forefront of issues that affect all people, nations and environments. In the first two months of 2010 alone a magnitude 7 earthquake near Port au Prince, Haiti killed an estimated 230,000 people, exposed the inadequacies of their infrastructure and emergency response capacity and virtually crippled an entire nation; whereas in contrast a month later a significantly larger magnitude 8.8 earthquake off the coast of Chile provided a sober lesson that those areas with a long history of exposure to natural hazards are indeed much more capable to cope with the consequences of unexpected events. The Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards effectively captures and integrates contributions from an international portfolio of specialists whose range of expertise address some 330 topics pertinent to the field of natural hazards. Disciplinary barriers are overcome in this comprehensive treatment of the subject matter. Clear illustrations and colour images enhance the primary aim to communicate and educate. The inclusion of a series of 'classic case study' events interspersed throughout the volume provides tangible examples linking concepts, issues and solutions.

About the Author

Peter Bobrowsky has been practising various aspects of geology for some 30 years. Based in Canada, his research in natural hazards has included fieldwork in North America, South America, India and China on topics ranging from paleo-tsunamis to landslide studies. His passion for studying the earth has taken him to some 100 countries.

Table of Contents

A'lav Accelerometer 'Act of God' Aerial photography for hazard recognition Albedo Animals and hazards Antecedent conditions Anti-seismic design Ash Asteroids Automated Local Evaluation in Real Time (ALERT) system Avalanches Aviation, hazards to Avulsion Base surge Beach nourishment (replenishment) Beaufort scale of wind speeds Biblical events Body wave Breakwater Building codes Building failure Buildings, structures and public safety Calder Cartography of natural hazards Catastrophe and catastrophe theory Casualties in natural hazards Civil protection and civil contingencies management Classification of disasters Climate change Cloud seeding Coastal erosion Coastal zone, risk management Cognitive dissonance Cold spells and freezing weather hazards Collapsing soil hazards Comets Community management of hazards Convergence Cost-benefit analysis of natural hazard mitigation Costing and surveying damage Costs of natural hazards and disasters Creep Critical Incidence Stress Syndrome Cryological engineering Cyclone Damage and the built environment Debris avalanche (Sturzstrom) Debris flow Desertification Disaster Disaster relief Disease epidemics and pandemics Disease epidemiology of natural disasters Dispersive soil hazards Doppler radar and Nexrad Dose rate (of risk) Drought Dust Bowl, the Dust devil Dust storm Dvorak classification of hurricane seedlings Earthquake damage Earthquake prediction Earthquakes Economics of disasters Education and training for emergency preparedness Elastic rebound, theory of Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) El Niño Southern Oscillation, hazards associated with Emergency communication Emergency management Emergency mapping Emergency planning Emergency shelter Epicentre Erodibility Erosion Erosivity Evacuation Expansive soils and clays Expert systems for disaster management Exposure to natural hazards Extensometers and tiltmeters Failsafe design Famine Faults Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), USA Fetch Fire and firestorm Flash flood Flood deposits Flood hazards and disasters Floodplain Flood protection Flood stage Floodway Fluid withdrawal subsidence Fog hazards Föhn Forest and range fires (wildfire) Frequency and magnitude of events Frost hazards Fumarole Gap, seismic Gases Geographic information systems (GIS) and natural hazards Geological/geophysical disasters Glacier hazards Global change and its implications for natural disaster Global Positioning System (GPS) and natural hazards Global Telemetered Seismograph Network (GTSN) Groin Hadley cell Hail and hailstorms Harmonic tremor Hazard Hazardousness of place Heat waves High-rise buildings in natural disaster Historical events History of natural disasters Hospitals in disaster Human impact of hazards Human life, economic value of Humanity as an agent of geological disaster Hurricane (tropical cyclone, typhoon) Hydrocompaction subsidence Hydrograph, flood Hydrometeorological hazards Hypocentre Ice and icebergs Inclinometer Indian Ocean tsunami Induced seismicity Information and communications technology Insects Insurance Integrated emergency management system Intensity measures International strategies for disaster reduction: the IDNDR and ISDR Internet, World Wide Web and natural hazards Inversion layer Isoseismal Jet stream Jökulhlaup (débâcle) Karst hazards Krakatoa (Krakatau) Lahar Landsat (satellite) Landslide (mass movement) Land degradation Land subsidence Land use, urbanization and natural hazards Lateral spreading Lava Levee Lightning Liquefaction Loading, consolidation and compaction subsidence Loess Macroseismic survey Magma Magnitude scales Mantled karst, dolines (sinkholes) Marginalization Marine hazards Mass media and natural disasters Mass movement Medical emergencies Megacities and natural hazards Mercalli, Giuseppe Meteorite Microzonation and macrozonation of natural hazards Misconceptions about natural disaster Mitigation Models of hazard and disaster Modified Mercalli (MM) scale Monitoring and prediction of natural hazards Monsoon Mortality and morbidity in natural disasters Mudflow Myths and misconceptions Natural disaster Natural disasters in developing countries Natural hazard Natural radioactivity Neotectonics Non-structural mitigation Nuée ardente (glowing avalanche) Overgrazing Ozone Pacific Tsunami Warning System (PTWS) Pahoehoe lava Paleoseismology Perception of natural hazards and disasters Permafrost Piezometer Piping hazards Planning measures and political aspects Plate tectonics Political economy of soil erosion disasters Pore-water pressure Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Potential evapotranspiration (PET) Prediction of hazards Probable maximum precipitation (PMP) Primary (P wave) Psychological impacts of natural disasters Public health and sanitation in natural disasters Pyroclastiflow Quick clays and quick sands Radon hazards Recovery and reconstruction after disaster Recurrence interval Red Cross, the Release rate Remote sensing of natural hazards and disasters Reservoir dams and natural hazards Resilience Richter, Charles F. Risk estimation, assessment, management and communication Rogue wave Rotational slide San Andreas fault, California Santorini, eruption of Sea level change Search and rescue Sea surge Secondary (S wave) Sedimentation of rivers and reservoirs Seiche Seismic acceleration and attenuation Seismograph/seismometer Seismology Shear Shield volcano Simulation of natural disaster Sinkhole Slope stability Slumps and slides Snowstorms and blizzards Social behaviour Sociology of disasters Solifluction Storms and storm surge Structural mitigation Subduction Subsidence: economic and legal aspects Subsidence induced by underground mining Sunspots Supernova Surge Susceptibility Tangshan, China (1976 earthquake) Tectonic and tectono-seismic hazards Tephra Thunderstorms Tidal bore Time and space in disaster Tornadoes Triage Tsunamis United Nations Organisation and natural disasters Universal soil loss equation (USLE) Unreinforced masonry building Urban environments and natural hazards Vajont Dam, Italy Vesuvius Volcanoes/volcanic eruptions Vulnerability Warning systems Waterspouts World economy, impact of disasters on World-wide trends in natural disasters.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781402043994
Publisher:
Springer
Location:
Dordrecht
Author:
Schmidt-Thom, Philipp
Author:
Beer, Tom
Author:
Schmidt-Thomé, Philipp
Author:
Slovic, Paul
Author:
Basabe, Pedro
Author:
Catto, Norm
Author:
Bobrowsky, Peter T.
Author:
Gusiakov, Viacheslav
Author:
Nadim, Farrokh
Author:
Melosh, H. Jay
Author:
McGuire, Bill
Author:
Alexander, D. E.
Author:
Bobrowsky, Peter
Subject:
Natural Disasters
Subject:
Dynamic Earth
Subject:
Natural hazards
Subject:
Risk
Subject:
vulnerability
Subject:
Geomorphology
Subject:
Earth Sciences - General
Subject:
Physical geography
Subject:
Geology-General
Subject:
Geography
Subject:
The Arts
Subject:
Earth and Environmental Science
Subject:
Geology
Copyright:
Edition Description:
2013
Series:
Encyclopedia of Earth Sciences Series
Publication Date:
20110601
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
1175
Dimensions:
297 x 210 mm

Related Subjects

Science and Mathematics » Geology » General
Science and Mathematics » Geology » Geophysics
Science and Mathematics » Physics
Science and Mathematics » Physics » Meteorology

Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards (Encyclopedia of Earth Sciences)
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Product details 1175 pages Springer - English 9781402043994 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Few subjects share the true interdisciplinary dependency that characterizes the field of natural hazards. The Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards effectively captures and integrates contributions from international specialists whose range of expertise address some 250 topics pertinent to the field of natural hazards.
"Synopsis" by , Few subjects have caught the attention of the entire world as much as those dealing with natural hazards. The human losses (some 225,000 people) associated with the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, the economic costs (exceeding 100 billion USD) of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the collective social impacts of tragedies experienced during the 2008 Sichuan, China earthquake and landslides, all provide repetitive reminders that we are all but temporary guests occupying a very dynamic planet. Few subjects share the true interdisciplinary dependency that characterizes the field of natural hazards. From geology and geophysics, to engineering and emergency response, to social psychology and economics, the study of natural hazards draws input from an impressive suite of unique and previously independent specializations. Natural hazards provide a common platform to reduce disciplinary boundaries and facilitate a beneficial synergy in the provision of timely and useful information on the critical subject matter.As social norms change regarding the concept of acceptable risk and human migration leads to an explosion in the number of megacities, coastal over-crowding and unmanaged habitation in precarious environments such as mountainous slopes, the vulnerability of people to natural hazards increases dramatically. Coupled with the concerns of changing climates, the subject of natural hazards remains on the forefront of issues that affect all people, nations and environments. In the first two months of 2010 alone a magnitude 7 earthquake near Port au Prince, Haiti killed an estimated 230,000 people, exposed the inadequacies of their infrastructure and emergency response capacity and virtually crippled an entire nation; whereas in contrast a month later a significantly larger magnitude 8.8 earthquake off the coast of Chile provided a sober lesson that those areas with a long history of exposure to natural hazards are indeed much more capable to cope with the consequences of unexpected events. The Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards effectively captures and integrates contributions from an international portfolio of specialists whose range of expertise address some 330 topics pertinent to the field of natural hazards. Disciplinary barriers are overcome in this comprehensive treatment of the subject matter. Clear illustrations and colour images enhance the primary aim to communicate and educate. The inclusion of a series of 'classic case study' events interspersed throughout the volume provides tangible examples linking concepts, issues and solutions.
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