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The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation Is Changing the Middle East

by

The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation Is Changing the Middle East Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Renowned blogger and Middle East expert Juan Cole takes us and#8220;inside the youth movements in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, showing us how activists used technology and social media to amplify their message and connect with like-minded citizensand#8221; (andlt;iandgt;The New York Timesandlt;/iandgt;) in this and#8220;rousing study of the Arab Springand#8221; (andlt;iandgt;Publishers Weekly,andlt;/iandgt; starred review).andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;For three decades, Cole has sought to put the relationship of the West and the Muslim world in historical context. In andlt;iandgt;The New Arabsandlt;/iandgt; he has written and#8220;an elegant, carefully delineated synthesis of the complicated, intertwined facets of the Arab uprisings,and#8221; (andlt;iandgt;Kirkus Reviewsandlt;/iandgt;), illuminating the role of todayand#8217;s Arab youthand#8212;who they are, what they want, and how they will affect world politics.andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Not all big groups of teenagers and twenty-somethings necessarily produce historical movements centered on their identity as youth, with a generational set of organizations, symbols, and demands rooted at least partially in the distinctive problems of people their age. The Arab Millennials did. And, in a provocative, big-picture argument about the future of the Arab world, andlt;iandgt;The New Arabsandlt;/iandgt; shows just how they did it. and#8220;Engaging, powerful, and comprehensiveand#8230;The book feels as indispensable to scholars as it is insightful for a more casual readerand#8221; (andlt;iandgt;Los Angeles Timesandlt;/iandgt;).

Review:

"Young people and their smartphones overthrow dictatorships in this rousing study of the Arab Spring. University of Michigan historian Cole (Engaging the Muslim World) follows the revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya from their roots in dissident organizing though the mass protests of 2011, the collapse of repressive regimes, and ensuing political turmoil. He focuses on the leadership of the 'millennial' generation of young, urban, secular activists, their horizons broadened by the Internet and satellite TV, their 'interactive networks and horizontal organizations' empowered by blogs and YouTube videos that spread ideas and rallied demonstrators. Cole's exhilarating journalistic narrative of their exploits is enlivened by interviews with participants and his own colorful firsthand accounts of upheavals. His emphasis on youth and technology is sometimes overdone; revolution was for young firebrands as much in 1848 as in 2011, and old-fashioned factors — allegiances of soldiers, the humble paper pamphlet — play as important a role as youthful élan and social media. However, Cole's deep, nuanced exploration of political and social currents underneath the uprisings shines; he shows Westerners who think the Arab world is divided between corrupt despots and Islamist zealots just how strong and pervasive the tendencies towards liberalism and democracy are. Agent: Robert Barnett, Williams & Connolly. (July)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

The renowned blogger and Middle East expert Juan Cole illuminates the role of todayand#8217;s Arab youthand#8212;who they are, what they want, and how they will affect world politics.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Beginning in January 2011, the revolutionary wave of demonstrations and protests, riots, and civil wars that comprised what many call and#8220;the Arab Springand#8221; shook the world. These upheavals were spearheaded by youth movements, and yet the crucial role they played is relatively unknown. Middle East expert Juan Cole is here to share their stories. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;For three decades, Cole has sought to put the relationship of the West and the Muslim world in historical context. In andlt;Iandgt;The New Arabsandlt;/Iandgt; he outlines the history that led to the dramatic changes in the region, and explores how a new generation of men and women are using innovative notions of personal rights to challenge the authoritarianism, corruption, and stagnation that had afflicted their societies.andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Not all big cohorts of teenagers and twenty-somethings necessarily produce movements centered on their identity as youth, with a generational set of organizations, symbols, and demands rooted at least partially in the distinctive problems besetting people of their age. The Arab Millennials did. And, in a provocative and optimistic argument about the future of the Arab world, andlt;Iandgt;The New Arabsandlt;/Iandgt; shows just how they did it.

About the Author

Juan Cole is Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan.andnbsp;He is the author of andlt;iandgt;Engaging the Muslim World andlt;/iandgt;and andlt;iandgt;Napoleonandrsquo;s Egyptandlt;/iandgt;. He has been a regular guest on andlt;iandgt;PBS NewsHourandlt;/iandgt; and has also appeared on andlt;iandgt;ABCandlt;/iandgt; andlt;iandgt;World Newsandlt;/iandgt;, andlt;iandgt;Nightlineandlt;/iandgt;, the andlt;iandgt;Today andlt;/iandgt;show, andlt;iandgt;Charlie Roseandlt;/iandgt;, andlt;iandgt;Anderson Cooper 360andlt;/iandgt;, andlt;iandgt;The Rachel Maddow Showandlt;/iandgt;, andlt;iandgt;The Colbert Reportandlt;/iandgt;, andlt;iandgt;Democracy Now!, Al Jazeera Americaandlt;/iandgt;, and many others. He has commented extensively on al-Qaeda and the Taliban, Iraq, the politics of Pakistan and Afghanistan, Syria, and Iranian domestic struggles and foreign affairs.andnbsp;He has a regular column on TruthDig.com. Visit JuanCole.com.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781451690392
Author:
Cole, Juan
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Subject:
Politics - General
Subject:
Juan Cole, History, Middle East, Muslim, al-Qaeda, Taliban, Iraq War, politics, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, foreign affairs, Arab, youth, political, social change, Egypt, iactivist, Tahrir Square, Rebellion Movement, millennials, non-fiction
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20140731
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
index, rough front
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
228.6 x 152.4 mm

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » New Arrivals » Nonfiction
History and Social Science » Middle East » General History

The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation Is Changing the Middle East New Hardcover
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Product details 368 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9781451690392 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Young people and their smartphones overthrow dictatorships in this rousing study of the Arab Spring. University of Michigan historian Cole (Engaging the Muslim World) follows the revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya from their roots in dissident organizing though the mass protests of 2011, the collapse of repressive regimes, and ensuing political turmoil. He focuses on the leadership of the 'millennial' generation of young, urban, secular activists, their horizons broadened by the Internet and satellite TV, their 'interactive networks and horizontal organizations' empowered by blogs and YouTube videos that spread ideas and rallied demonstrators. Cole's exhilarating journalistic narrative of their exploits is enlivened by interviews with participants and his own colorful firsthand accounts of upheavals. His emphasis on youth and technology is sometimes overdone; revolution was for young firebrands as much in 1848 as in 2011, and old-fashioned factors — allegiances of soldiers, the humble paper pamphlet — play as important a role as youthful élan and social media. However, Cole's deep, nuanced exploration of political and social currents underneath the uprisings shines; he shows Westerners who think the Arab world is divided between corrupt despots and Islamist zealots just how strong and pervasive the tendencies towards liberalism and democracy are. Agent: Robert Barnett, Williams & Connolly. (July)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , The renowned blogger and Middle East expert Juan Cole illuminates the role of todayand#8217;s Arab youthand#8212;who they are, what they want, and how they will affect world politics.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Beginning in January 2011, the revolutionary wave of demonstrations and protests, riots, and civil wars that comprised what many call and#8220;the Arab Springand#8221; shook the world. These upheavals were spearheaded by youth movements, and yet the crucial role they played is relatively unknown. Middle East expert Juan Cole is here to share their stories. andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;For three decades, Cole has sought to put the relationship of the West and the Muslim world in historical context. In andlt;Iandgt;The New Arabsandlt;/Iandgt; he outlines the history that led to the dramatic changes in the region, and explores how a new generation of men and women are using innovative notions of personal rights to challenge the authoritarianism, corruption, and stagnation that had afflicted their societies.andlt;BRandgt; andlt;BRandgt;Not all big cohorts of teenagers and twenty-somethings necessarily produce movements centered on their identity as youth, with a generational set of organizations, symbols, and demands rooted at least partially in the distinctive problems besetting people of their age. The Arab Millennials did. And, in a provocative and optimistic argument about the future of the Arab world, andlt;Iandgt;The New Arabsandlt;/Iandgt; shows just how they did it.
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