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What's Wrong with the Poor?: Psychiatry, Race, and the War on Poverty (Studies in Social Medicine)

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What's Wrong with the Poor?: Psychiatry, Race, and the War on Poverty (Studies in Social Medicine) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the 1960s, policymakers and mental health experts joined forces to participate in President Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty. In her insightful interdisciplinary history, physician and historian Mical Raz examines the interplay between psychiatric theory and social policy throughout that decade, ending with President Richard Nixon's 1971 veto of a bill that would have provided universal day care. She shows that this cooperation between mental health professionals and policymakers was based on an understanding of what poor men, women, and children lacked. This perception was rooted in psychiatric theories of deprivation focused on two overlapping sections of American society: the poor had less, and African Americans, disproportionately represented among America's poor, were seen as having practically nothing.

Raz analyzes the political and cultural context that led child mental health experts, educators, and policymakers to embrace this deprivation-based theory and its translation into liberal social policy. Deprivation theory, she shows, continues to haunt social policy today, profoundly shaping how both health professionals and educators view children from low-income and culturally and linguistically diverse homes.

Synopsis:

In her insightful interdisciplinary history, physician and historian Mical Raz examines the interplay between psychiatric theory and social policy throughout the 1960s, ending with President Richard Nixon's 1971 veto of a bill that would have provided universal day care. She shows that this cooperation between mental health professionals and policymakers was based on an understanding of what poor men, women, and children lacked. This perception was rooted in psychiatric theories of deprivation focused on two overlapping sections of American society: the poor had less, and African Americans, disproportionately represented among America's poor, were seen as having practically nothing.

About the Author

Mical Raz, M.D., Ph.D., is a physician and historian of medicine. She is author of The Lobotomy Letters: The Making of American Psychosurgery.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781469608877
Author:
Raz, Mical
Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
Subject:
Psychiatry
Subject:
Race
Subject:
Head Start
Subject:
Mobilization for Youth
Subject:
early childhood intervention
Subject:
Kerner Commission
Subject:
Race riots
Subject:
Sensory deprivation.
Subject:
Maternal deprivation.
Subject:
Cultural deprivation.
Subject:
Civil rights movement.
Subject:
intellectual disability
Subject:
least restrictive environment
Subject:
Day care.
Subject:
Mainstreaming
Subject:
Mary Ainsworth
Subject:
Joseph McVicker Hunt
Subject:
Moynihan Report
Subject:
Environmental psychology
Subject:
war on poverty
Subject:
race and war on poverty
Subject:
mental health and war on poverty
Subject:
Mical Raz /
Subject:
Ethnic Studies-Racism and Ethnic Conflict
Subject:
Sociology-Poverty
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20131131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 halftones
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Professional Medical Reference
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Racism and Ethnic Conflict
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » Sociology » Poverty

What's Wrong with the Poor?: Psychiatry, Race, and the War on Poverty (Studies in Social Medicine) New Hardcover
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Product details 272 pages University of North Carolina Press - English 9781469608877 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In her insightful interdisciplinary history, physician and historian Mical Raz examines the interplay between psychiatric theory and social policy throughout the 1960s, ending with President Richard Nixon's 1971 veto of a bill that would have provided universal day care. She shows that this cooperation between mental health professionals and policymakers was based on an understanding of what poor men, women, and children lacked. This perception was rooted in psychiatric theories of deprivation focused on two overlapping sections of American society: the poor had less, and African Americans, disproportionately represented among America's poor, were seen as having practically nothing.
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