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Basic Income: A Transformative Policy for India

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Basic Income: A Transformative Policy for India Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This book reports on three overlapping pilot schemes in Madhya Pradesh and Delhi, including a special project in tribal villages, in which over 6,000 people were provided with a modest basic income paid monthly over 18 months. The project was funded by UNICEF and UNDP and implemented by SEWA (The Indian Self-Employed Womens Association). Written by Guy Standing, who designed the pilot schemes and Renana Jhabvala, the head of SEWA, who implemented them, the book examines the transformative effects of these pilot schemes at the individual, family and local economy levels.

India is mired in bureaucratic rigidities and hierarchical structures of exploitation and oppression, leading to a well-known problem the overly complex system of public welfare services. It is widely recognised that this system requires innovative intervention, via transparent policies that are able to avoid political capture.

The pilots are discussed in the context of the new Food Security Act, the governments job guarantee plan, MGNREGA, and ongoing debate over the efficacy of the Public Distribution System and its ration shops disbursing rice, wheat, sugar and kerosene. The authors look at a number of alternative options for addressing rural poverty, including subsidies, targeting, selectivity and conditionality, contrasting them with the basic income model. They argue that the provision of basic incomes not only provides economic security but has many knock-on effects, allowing families to escape the debt trap, enrich food consumption and unlock constraints to schooling and healthcare. Above all it may enable individuals, including women, the disabled, the elderly and those in excluded castes or tribes, to engage more effectively in wider society.

Synopsis:

Would it be possible to provide people with a basic income as a right? The idea has a long history. This book draws on two pilot schemes conducted in the Indian State of Madhya Pradesh, in which thousands of men, women and children were provided with an unconditional monthly cash payment.
In a context in which the Indian government at national and state levels spends a vast amount on subsidies and selective schemes that are chronically expensive, inefficient, inequitable and subject to extensive corruption, there is scope for switching at least some of the spending to a modest basic income. This book explores what would be likely to happen if this were done.

The book draws on a series of evaluation surveys conducted over the course of the eighteen months in which the main pilot was in operation, supplemented with detailed case studies of individuals and families. It looks at the impact on health and nutrition, on schooling, on economic activity, women's agency and the welfare of those with disabilities.

Above all, the book considers whether or not a basic income could be transformative, in not only improving individual and family welfare but in promoting economic growth and development, as well as having an emancipatory effect for people long mired in conditions of poverty and economic insecurity.

About the Author

Guy Standing is Professor of Development Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, UK. He is Director of the Socio-Economic Security Programme of the International Labour Organization and co-president of the Basic Income Earth Network. His recent books include Work after Globalization: Building Occupational Citizenship (2009) and Beyond the New Paternalism: Basic Security as Equality (2002).

Renana Jhabvala is head of SEWA, the Self-Employed Womens Association of India. She is the recipient of the Presidents Award for distinguished services to the country.

Table of Contents

Preface
1. The Transformative Challenge
2. Basic Income Defined
3. A Little More, How Much It Is
4. Escaping the Debt Trap
5. Creeping Towards Social Citizenship
6. From Subsidised Malnutrition to Healthy Development
7. Agency and Cultural Citizenship
8. Rolling Out Basic Income
Bibliography
Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9781472583116
Author:
Standing, Guy
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Academic
Author:
Jhabvala, Renana
Author:
Davala, Sarath
Author:
Mehta, Soumya Kapoor
Subject:
Labor & Industrial Relations
Subject:
Public Affairs & Administration
Subject:
Developing & Emerging Countries
Subject:
Poverty & Homelessness
Subject:
Politics-Labor
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20150331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
248
Dimensions:
9.2126 x 6.14173 in 1 lb

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Labor
History and Social Science » Sociology » Poverty

Basic Income: A Transformative Policy for India New Trade Paper
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Product details 248 pages Bloomsbury Academic - English 9781472583116 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Would it be possible to provide people with a basic income as a right? The idea has a long history. This book draws on two pilot schemes conducted in the Indian State of Madhya Pradesh, in which thousands of men, women and children were provided with an unconditional monthly cash payment.
In a context in which the Indian government at national and state levels spends a vast amount on subsidies and selective schemes that are chronically expensive, inefficient, inequitable and subject to extensive corruption, there is scope for switching at least some of the spending to a modest basic income. This book explores what would be likely to happen if this were done.

The book draws on a series of evaluation surveys conducted over the course of the eighteen months in which the main pilot was in operation, supplemented with detailed case studies of individuals and families. It looks at the impact on health and nutrition, on schooling, on economic activity, women's agency and the welfare of those with disabilities.

Above all, the book considers whether or not a basic income could be transformative, in not only improving individual and family welfare but in promoting economic growth and development, as well as having an emancipatory effect for people long mired in conditions of poverty and economic insecurity.
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