The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Powell's Q&A | September 3, 2014

Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$14.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Drama- Plays
25 Local Warehouse Drama- American Anthology

August: Osage County

by

August: Osage County Cover

ISBN13: 9781559363303
ISBN10: 1559363304
All Product Details

 

Awards

2008 Pulitzer Prize for Drama
2008 Tony Award for Best Play

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One of the most bracing and critically acclaimed plays in recent Broadway history, August: Osage County is a portrait of the dysfunctional American family at its finest-and absolute worst. When the patriarch of the Weston clan disappears one hot summer night, the family reunites at the Oklahoma homestead, where long-held secrets are unflinchingly and uproariously revealed.

The three-act, three-and-a-half-hour mammoth of a play combines epic tragedy with black comedy, dramatizing three generations of unfulfilled dreams and leaving not one of its thirteen characters unscathed. After its sold-out Chicago premiere, the play has electrified audiences in New York since its opening in November 2007.

Review:

"August is the most exciting new American play Broadway has seen in years." The New York Times

Review:

"A tremendous achievement in American playwriting: a tragicomic populist portrait of a tough land and a tougher people." David Cote, TimeOut New York

Review:

"Letts' astonishing creation...is mammoth in many ways. It's a full, three-act evening, more than three hours in length. And there are 13 characters, each getting Letts' full attention. He creates a parade of memorable people spanning several generations of unhappiness and unfulfilled dreams. August: Osage County has introduced a major playwright to Broadway." Michael Kuchwara, Associated Press

Review:

"This fusion of epic tragedy and black comedy is...a bold step forward for Letts, whose earthy, distinctly contemporary wit flows throughout. Originally presented at Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre, his account of a family whose secrets and lies come spilling forth under duress ranks with the best American drama of the past decade." Elysa Gardner, USA Today

Synopsis:

Winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Drama

“A tremendous achievement in American playwriting: a tragicomic populist portrait of a tough land and a tougher people.”—Time Out New York

“Tracy Letts’ August: Osage County is what O’Neill would be writing in 2007. Letts has recaptured the nobility of American drama’s mid-century heyday while still creating something entirely original.”—New York magazine

One of the most bracing and critically acclaimed plays in recent Broadway history, August: Osage County is a portrait of the dysfunctional American family at its finest—and absolute worst. When the patriarch of the Weston clan disappears one hot summer night, the family reunites at the Oklahoma homestead, where long-held secrets are unflinchingly and uproariously revealed. The three-act, three-and-a-half-hour mammoth of a play combines epic tragedy with black comedy, dramatizing three generations of unfulfilled dreams and leaving not one of its thirteen characters unscathed. After its sold-out Chicago premiere, the play has electrified audiences in New York since its opening in November 2007.

Tracy Letts is the author of Killer Joe, Bug, and Man from Nebraska, which was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. His plays have been performed throughout the country and internationally. A performer as well as a playwright, Letts is a member of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company, where August: Osage County premiered.

About the Author

Tracy Letts is the author of Killer Joe, Bug, and Man From Nebraska, which was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. He is a member of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company, where August: Osage County premiered.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

juls_h_, January 13, 2010 (view all comments by juls_h_)
If a play can be entered as a favorite book, then I would love to nominate Tracy Lett's August:Osage County into the Puddly Award pool. This hilarious but poignant play about a dysfunctional family on the eve following the loss of a family member is full of knee-slapping, heart-rendering moments that make each page a delight to read. It shocks, amuses and astounds the reader, and is a journey through very different lives bound by the familial common thread. Hopefully most readers will not literally identify with any of the characters, but certainly a less extreme version of each can be found in our own families, neighbors, friends, coworkers, or even ourselves. Abundantly flawed but rich in humanity, these folks tell it like it is, and do not hold back on anything, which is to the reader's divine benefit.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Yonathan, March 17, 2009 (view all comments by Yonathan)
A dilapidated, one hundred year-old farmhouse on the plains outside Tulsa has been the home of the Weston family for generations, and Beverly Weston, the family patriarch, has long found refuge in alcohol. His termagant wife Violet takes pills, whatever pills she can lay hands on, and the two have little in common and have not really communicated for years. Bev, who once published a collection of poetry, now spends time quoting T. S. Eliot, and Eliot's line that "Life is very long..." serves as a motto for Bev in his life. Bev's Prologue sets the tone for the play, and when Act One begins, Bev has disappeared. The family has gathered to support each other while they await news on his whereabouts.

A dysfunctional family which represents just about every problem a family can have, the Westons who have gathered are the three daughters of Bev and Violet, along with Violet's sister Mattie Fay, her husband, and adult son. Barbara, at forty-six the eldest of the Westons' children, has arrived with her husband and precocious fourteen-year-old daughter. Ivy Weston, age forty-four, is unmarried, constantly resisting her mother's meddlesome probing and her cruel remarks about catching a man. Karen Weston, the youngest, at forty, has brought her fifty-year-old fiancé with her. In the course of the three hours or more of this play, the family, overwhelmed by the selfish mean-spiritedness Violet, reveals and/or deals with their self-destructive behavior on all levels--from addictions, unhappy marriages, and infidelity, to sadism, suicide, pedophilia, and even incest.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781559363303
Author:
Letts, Tracy
Publisher:
Theatre Communications Group
Subject:
Family
Subject:
Parent and adult child
Subject:
American
Subject:
General Drama
Subject:
Drama-American Anthology
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20080231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
152
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.4 x 0.5 in 7.5 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Doubt: A Parable Used Trade Paper $8.00
  2. The Seafarer
    Used Trade Paper $8.00
  3. Blackbird (Faber and Faber Plays) Used Trade Paper $6.50
  4. Wit
    Used Trade Paper $6.95
  5. The Absolutely True Diary of a...
    Used Trade Paper $8.00
  6. Metamorphoses: A Play Used Trade Paper $9.00

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Drama » American Anthology
Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Featured Titles
Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Plays

August: Osage County New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.95 In Stock
Product details 152 pages Theatre Communications Group - English 9781559363303 Reviews:
"Review" by , "August is the most exciting new American play Broadway has seen in years."
"Review" by , "A tremendous achievement in American playwriting: a tragicomic populist portrait of a tough land and a tougher people."
"Review" by , "Letts' astonishing creation...is mammoth in many ways. It's a full, three-act evening, more than three hours in length. And there are 13 characters, each getting Letts' full attention. He creates a parade of memorable people spanning several generations of unhappiness and unfulfilled dreams. August: Osage County has introduced a major playwright to Broadway."
"Review" by , "This fusion of epic tragedy and black comedy is...a bold step forward for Letts, whose earthy, distinctly contemporary wit flows throughout. Originally presented at Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre, his account of a family whose secrets and lies come spilling forth under duress ranks with the best American drama of the past decade."
"Synopsis" by ,

Winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Drama

“A tremendous achievement in American playwriting: a tragicomic populist portrait of a tough land and a tougher people.”—Time Out New York

“Tracy Letts’ August: Osage County is what O’Neill would be writing in 2007. Letts has recaptured the nobility of American drama’s mid-century heyday while still creating something entirely original.”—New York magazine

One of the most bracing and critically acclaimed plays in recent Broadway history, August: Osage County is a portrait of the dysfunctional American family at its finest—and absolute worst. When the patriarch of the Weston clan disappears one hot summer night, the family reunites at the Oklahoma homestead, where long-held secrets are unflinchingly and uproariously revealed. The three-act, three-and-a-half-hour mammoth of a play combines epic tragedy with black comedy, dramatizing three generations of unfulfilled dreams and leaving not one of its thirteen characters unscathed. After its sold-out Chicago premiere, the play has electrified audiences in New York since its opening in November 2007.

Tracy Letts is the author of Killer Joe, Bug, and Man from Nebraska, which was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. His plays have been performed throughout the country and internationally. A performer as well as a playwright, Letts is a member of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company, where August: Osage County premiered.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.