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Hello World: A Life in Ham Radio

by

Hello World: A Life in Ham Radio Cover

 

Staff Pick

Author Danny Gregory went to a flea market and found a ring binder containing 369 colorful and cryptic-looking postcards. Intrigued, he bought the collection and did some investigating. These cards were ham radio QSL cards, which are postcards that hams send to one another after they make contact over the airwaves. This particular collection once belonged to a man named Jerry Powell, an aeronautical engineer who died at age 93 in 2000. Jerry was a lifelong ham radio enthusiast — his earliest QSL card is from 1928. Hello World: A Life in Ham Radio won't teach you how to become a ham, or show you new ham radio techniques. Its not a technical book at all. Instead, this book is about Jerry Powells life as seen through his lifelong hobby, and its a compelling and absorbing read, even for readers who aren't hams.

All QSL cards are unique. They feature the call sign for a radio station, and includes cryptic notes on the conversation, the kind of radio equipment used in this connection, and little personal touches that reflect the ham's personality. Each QSL card is either made by or for the ham, and it's very much like a picture postcard from that region. Some cards look like regular tourist postcards, and others are hand-drawn, or feature photos of the ham with family or, more commonly, in their radio shack.

Hello World was designed by Paul Sahre, a well-known illustrator. His design work in this book is amazing and carefully organized so both diehard ham radio operators and novices can appreciate Jerry Powell's worldwide ham radio contacts over the course of his lifetime. All the pages are adorned with colorful QSL cards with detailed annotations for many of them. There's a fold-out map of the world with little dots for all of the ham connections Powell made worldwide, so readers can cross-reference the QSL cards in his collection. There's also a chart graphing the number of QSL cards that Powell received per decade. 1940-1949 was his most prolific period, with 98 contacts.

Hello World is a wonderful book for ham radio fans, graphic design geeks, or anybody who wants to learn more about this secret society.
Recommended by Carole R., Powells.com

Will the internet replace the need for ham radio? Not according to life long ham radio operator Jerry Powell. More than an old-man's pastime, ham continues to flourish in parts of the world where electricity and phone lines are nonexistent. It connects the world in ways other media cannot; from Howland Island to bombed out Iraq to Topeka, Kansas. Designed by infamous Paul Sahre - another ham operator (who knew?).
Recommended by Carole R., Powells.com

Author Danny Gregory went to a flea market and found a ring binder containing 369 colorful and cryptic-looking postcards. Intrigued, he bought the collection and did some investigating. These cards were ham radio QSL cards, which are postcards that hams send to one another after they make contact over the airwaves. This particular collection once belonged to a man named Jerry Powell, an aeronautical engineer who died at age 93 in 2000. Jerry was a lifelong ham radio enthusiast — his earliest QSL card is from 1928. Hello World: A Life in Ham Radio won't teach you how to become a ham, or show you new ham radio techniques. Its not a technical book at all. Instead, this book is about Jerry Powells life as seen through his lifelong hobby, and its a compelling and absorbing read, even for readers who aren't hams.

All QSL cards are unique. They feature the call sign for a radio station, and includes cryptic notes on the conversation, the kind of radio equipment used in this connection, and little personal touches that reflect the ham's personality. Each QSL card is either made by or for the ham, and it's very much like a picture postcard from that region. Some cards look like regular tourist postcards, and others are hand-drawn, or feature photos of the ham with family or, more commonly, in their radio shack.

Hello World was designed by Paul Sahre, a well-known illustrator. His design work in this book is amazing and carefully organized so both diehard ham radio operators and novices can appreciate Jerry Powell's worldwide ham radio contacts over the course of his lifetime. All the pages are adorned with colorful QSL cards with detailed annotations for many of them. There's a fold-out map of the world with little dots for all of the ham connections Powell made worldwide, so readers can cross-reference the QSL cards in his collection. There's also a chart graphing the number of QSL cards that Powell received per decade. 1940-1949 was his most prolific period, with 98 contacts.

Hello World is a wonderful book for ham radio fans, graphic design geeks, or anybody who wants to learn more about this secret society.
Recommended by Amy, Powells.com

Will the internet replace the need for ham radio? Not according to life long ham radio operator Jerry Powell. More than an old-man's pastime, ham continues to flourish in parts of the world where electricity and phone lines are nonexistent. It connects the world in ways other media cannot; from Howland Island to bombed out Iraq to Topeka, Kansas. Designed by infamous Paul Sahre - another ham operator (who knew?).
Recommended by Amy, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Jerry Powell was an ordinary guy on an extraordinary adventure. For 70 years he traveled the globe from his basement in Hackensack, New Jersey, using his ham radio to meet hundreds of people in the most remote corners of the world, literally from Antarctica to outer space. In return, each contact sent him a QSL card—the personalized calling card of "hams." Hello World follows Powell's life, and the history of the world, through this collection. At the same time, the book is an exploration of a fascinating technology, the true precursor of the Internet, that still absorbs millions of people worldwide.

Review:

"Excellent! An intriguing story that's finally been told." Jim Haynie, W5JBP, AARL President

Review:

"This remarkable doument of a charming and oft-overlooked American subculture is equally valuable as a resource for stunning vernacular typography." Chip Kidd, author of The Cheese Monkeys

Review:

"A beautifully designed love letter to an 'average hobbiest,' Hello World is also a fascinating look at the crucial but unsung role that ham radios have played ? and continue to play ? in service to our country." Amy Fusselman, author of The Pharmacist's Mate

Review:

"I used to think a ham radio was just a big gray box in the basement. Now I know, ham radio is a hobby that makes people happy." Pam Rice, librarian/teacher Campbellsville, Kentucky

Synopsis:

To an outsider, the world of ham radio is one of basement transmitters, clunky microphones, Morse code, and crackly, possibly clandestine, worldwide communications, a world both mysterious and geeky. But the real story is a lot more interesting: indeed, there are more than two million operators worldwide, including people like Walter Cronkite and Priscilla Presley. Gandhi had a ham radio, as do Marlon Brando and Juan Carlos, king of Spain.

Hello World takes us on a seventy-year odyssey through the world of ham radio. From 1927 until his death in 2001, operator Jerry Powell transmitted radio signals from his bedroom in Hackensack, New Jersey, touring the world?s most remote locations and communicating with people from Greenland to occupied Japan. Once he made contact with a fellow ham operator, he exchanged postcards ? known as QSLs cards ? with them. For seven decades, Powell collected hundreds of these cards, documenting his fascinating career in amateur radio and providing a dazzling graphic inventory of people and places far flung.

This book is both an introduction to the fascinating world of ham and a visual feast for anyone interested in the universal language of graphic design.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 254-255).

Synopsis:

A Life in Ham Radio.

About the Author

Danny Gregory lives in New York City.

Paul Sahre is principal of his own design firm. He lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781568982816
Author:
Gregory, Danny
Publisher:
Princeton Architectural Press
Author:
Sahre, Paul
Location:
New York
Subject:
Radio
Subject:
Radio - General
Subject:
Amateur radio stations
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Series Volume:
1465
Publication Date:
20030301
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 8 up to 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.22x6.86x.91 in. 1.69 lbs.
Age Level:
from 13 up to 99

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Types
Biography » General
Engineering » Communications » Radio

Hello World: A Life in Ham Radio Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.50 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Princeton Architectural Press - English 9781568982816 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Author Danny Gregory went to a flea market and found a ring binder containing 369 colorful and cryptic-looking postcards. Intrigued, he bought the collection and did some investigating. These cards were ham radio QSL cards, which are postcards that hams send to one another after they make contact over the airwaves. This particular collection once belonged to a man named Jerry Powell, an aeronautical engineer who died at age 93 in 2000. Jerry was a lifelong ham radio enthusiast — his earliest QSL card is from 1928. Hello World: A Life in Ham Radio won't teach you how to become a ham, or show you new ham radio techniques. Its not a technical book at all. Instead, this book is about Jerry Powells life as seen through his lifelong hobby, and its a compelling and absorbing read, even for readers who aren't hams.

All QSL cards are unique. They feature the call sign for a radio station, and includes cryptic notes on the conversation, the kind of radio equipment used in this connection, and little personal touches that reflect the ham's personality. Each QSL card is either made by or for the ham, and it's very much like a picture postcard from that region. Some cards look like regular tourist postcards, and others are hand-drawn, or feature photos of the ham with family or, more commonly, in their radio shack.

Hello World was designed by Paul Sahre, a well-known illustrator. His design work in this book is amazing and carefully organized so both diehard ham radio operators and novices can appreciate Jerry Powell's worldwide ham radio contacts over the course of his lifetime. All the pages are adorned with colorful QSL cards with detailed annotations for many of them. There's a fold-out map of the world with little dots for all of the ham connections Powell made worldwide, so readers can cross-reference the QSL cards in his collection. There's also a chart graphing the number of QSL cards that Powell received per decade. 1940-1949 was his most prolific period, with 98 contacts.

Hello World is a wonderful book for ham radio fans, graphic design geeks, or anybody who wants to learn more about this secret society.

"Staff Pick" by ,

Will the internet replace the need for ham radio? Not according to life long ham radio operator Jerry Powell. More than an old-man's pastime, ham continues to flourish in parts of the world where electricity and phone lines are nonexistent. It connects the world in ways other media cannot; from Howland Island to bombed out Iraq to Topeka, Kansas. Designed by infamous Paul Sahre - another ham operator (who knew?).

"Staff Pick" by ,

Author Danny Gregory went to a flea market and found a ring binder containing 369 colorful and cryptic-looking postcards. Intrigued, he bought the collection and did some investigating. These cards were ham radio QSL cards, which are postcards that hams send to one another after they make contact over the airwaves. This particular collection once belonged to a man named Jerry Powell, an aeronautical engineer who died at age 93 in 2000. Jerry was a lifelong ham radio enthusiast — his earliest QSL card is from 1928. Hello World: A Life in Ham Radio won't teach you how to become a ham, or show you new ham radio techniques. Its not a technical book at all. Instead, this book is about Jerry Powells life as seen through his lifelong hobby, and its a compelling and absorbing read, even for readers who aren't hams.

All QSL cards are unique. They feature the call sign for a radio station, and includes cryptic notes on the conversation, the kind of radio equipment used in this connection, and little personal touches that reflect the ham's personality. Each QSL card is either made by or for the ham, and it's very much like a picture postcard from that region. Some cards look like regular tourist postcards, and others are hand-drawn, or feature photos of the ham with family or, more commonly, in their radio shack.

Hello World was designed by Paul Sahre, a well-known illustrator. His design work in this book is amazing and carefully organized so both diehard ham radio operators and novices can appreciate Jerry Powell's worldwide ham radio contacts over the course of his lifetime. All the pages are adorned with colorful QSL cards with detailed annotations for many of them. There's a fold-out map of the world with little dots for all of the ham connections Powell made worldwide, so readers can cross-reference the QSL cards in his collection. There's also a chart graphing the number of QSL cards that Powell received per decade. 1940-1949 was his most prolific period, with 98 contacts.

Hello World is a wonderful book for ham radio fans, graphic design geeks, or anybody who wants to learn more about this secret society.

"Staff Pick" by ,

Will the internet replace the need for ham radio? Not according to life long ham radio operator Jerry Powell. More than an old-man's pastime, ham continues to flourish in parts of the world where electricity and phone lines are nonexistent. It connects the world in ways other media cannot; from Howland Island to bombed out Iraq to Topeka, Kansas. Designed by infamous Paul Sahre - another ham operator (who knew?).

"Review" by , "Excellent! An intriguing story that's finally been told."
"Review" by , "This remarkable doument of a charming and oft-overlooked American subculture is equally valuable as a resource for stunning vernacular typography."
"Review" by , "A beautifully designed love letter to an 'average hobbiest,' Hello World is also a fascinating look at the crucial but unsung role that ham radios have played ? and continue to play ? in service to our country."
"Review" by , "I used to think a ham radio was just a big gray box in the basement. Now I know, ham radio is a hobby that makes people happy."
"Synopsis" by , To an outsider, the world of ham radio is one of basement transmitters, clunky microphones, Morse code, and crackly, possibly clandestine, worldwide communications, a world both mysterious and geeky. But the real story is a lot more interesting: indeed, there are more than two million operators worldwide, including people like Walter Cronkite and Priscilla Presley. Gandhi had a ham radio, as do Marlon Brando and Juan Carlos, king of Spain.

Hello World takes us on a seventy-year odyssey through the world of ham radio. From 1927 until his death in 2001, operator Jerry Powell transmitted radio signals from his bedroom in Hackensack, New Jersey, touring the world?s most remote locations and communicating with people from Greenland to occupied Japan. Once he made contact with a fellow ham operator, he exchanged postcards ? known as QSLs cards ? with them. For seven decades, Powell collected hundreds of these cards, documenting his fascinating career in amateur radio and providing a dazzling graphic inventory of people and places far flung.

This book is both an introduction to the fascinating world of ham and a visual feast for anyone interested in the universal language of graphic design.

"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. 254-255).
"Synopsis" by , A Life in Ham Radio.
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