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Original Essays | April 11, 2014

Paul Laudiero: IMG Shit Rough Draft



I was sitting in a British and Irish romantic drama class my last semester in college when the idea for Shit Rough Drafts hit me. I was working... Continue »
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The Love of Impermanent Things: A Threshold Ecology

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Synopses & Reviews

Review:

"At the outset of this quiet, quirky book, O'Reilley (The Barn at the End of the World) declares that she has written neither a memoir nor a collection of essays: rather, she has collected ephemera. In vignettes that recall Barbara Holland's work, O'Reilley discusses the meaning of vocation — her job as a college English professor, she says, would not begin to capture her passion for pottery or her call to the ministry of spiritual direction. Her mother, recently dead, casts a long shadow; some of O'Reilley's strongest prose is about grief. She also pays good attention to nature and animals: dogs, goldfinches, elk and deer meander through her reflections. And this is a deeply spiritual book. O'Reilley equivocates about her belief in God, but she wakes up every morning praying and practices walking meditation. She lambastes the kind of Christians who have tamed and domesticated Jesus. The genre of occasional prose invites annoying, if forgivable, repetition — too many uses of the same Sufi phrase 'The soul flies in circles,' for instance. A Catholic turned Quaker, O'Reilley rebels against tidy religious language. 'I want every spiritual word to be new, minted that second. Or else I want silence.' Her language is not grandly new every second, but it certainly is lovely." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

At midlife, Mary Rose O'Reilley reflects on her past and her hard-won sense of self. She is determined, now, not to sacrifice or waste her self. She has struggled for years along the paths set by her suburban childhood, her Catholic upbringing, her failed marriage, and the mute duties of daughterhood. Now, she is trying to see the world through the eyes of the deer that stop outside her window and look in at her. As a wildlife rehabilitator, she feels a closer connection to the natural world as experienced by animals. As an apprentice potter, she sees in a Japanese tea bowl the ultimate balance of action and contemplation. As a Quaker, she can both sit still and sing. And as a writer, O'Reilley can speak clearly to readers at midlife who are expected to know it all, but don't.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781571312839
Author:
O'reilley, Mary Rose
Publisher:
Milkweed Editions
Author:
O'Reilley, Mary Rose
Subject:
General
Subject:
Poets, American
Subject:
English teachers
Subject:
Spiritual
Subject:
Self-Help/Spiritual
Subject:
SEL032000
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Poets, American -- 20th century.
Subject:
Saint Paul (Minn.)
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series:
World as Home
Publication Date:
20060431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in 20 oz

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Spiritual
Religion » Christianity » Quakers
Religion » Western Religions » Denominations

The Love of Impermanent Things: A Threshold Ecology New Hardcover
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Product details 320 pages Milkweed Editions - English 9781571312839 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "At the outset of this quiet, quirky book, O'Reilley (The Barn at the End of the World) declares that she has written neither a memoir nor a collection of essays: rather, she has collected ephemera. In vignettes that recall Barbara Holland's work, O'Reilley discusses the meaning of vocation — her job as a college English professor, she says, would not begin to capture her passion for pottery or her call to the ministry of spiritual direction. Her mother, recently dead, casts a long shadow; some of O'Reilley's strongest prose is about grief. She also pays good attention to nature and animals: dogs, goldfinches, elk and deer meander through her reflections. And this is a deeply spiritual book. O'Reilley equivocates about her belief in God, but she wakes up every morning praying and practices walking meditation. She lambastes the kind of Christians who have tamed and domesticated Jesus. The genre of occasional prose invites annoying, if forgivable, repetition — too many uses of the same Sufi phrase 'The soul flies in circles,' for instance. A Catholic turned Quaker, O'Reilley rebels against tidy religious language. 'I want every spiritual word to be new, minted that second. Or else I want silence.' Her language is not grandly new every second, but it certainly is lovely." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
At midlife, Mary Rose O'Reilley reflects on her past and her hard-won sense of self. She is determined, now, not to sacrifice or waste her self. She has struggled for years along the paths set by her suburban childhood, her Catholic upbringing, her failed marriage, and the mute duties of daughterhood. Now, she is trying to see the world through the eyes of the deer that stop outside her window and look in at her. As a wildlife rehabilitator, she feels a closer connection to the natural world as experienced by animals. As an apprentice potter, she sees in a Japanese tea bowl the ultimate balance of action and contemplation. As a Quaker, she can both sit still and sing. And as a writer, O'Reilley can speak clearly to readers at midlife who are expected to know it all, but don't.
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