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A Complicated Kindness

by

A Complicated Kindness Cover

 

Awards

2004 Governor General's Award Winner
2004 Giller Prize Shortlist

Staff Pick

Sharp and often howlingly funny — but insistently generous — A Complicated Kindness introduces sixteen-year-old Nomi Nickel, straining under the pressure of family, boys, and authority, common enough conflicts drawn here in extravagant, heartrending detail.
Recommended by Kevin Sampsell, Powells.com

This is simply the funniest, sweetest, coolest book of 2004. If you like Canadian Mennonites, you'll love A Complicated Kindness.
Recommended by Kevin Sampsell, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Half of our family, the better-looking half, is missing," Nomi tells us at the beginning of A Complicated Kindness. Left alone with her sad, peculiar father, her days are spent piecing together why her mother and sister have disappeared and contemplating her inevitable career at Happy Family Farms, a chicken slaughterhouse on the outskirts of East Village — not the East Village in New York City where Nomi would prefer to live, but a dull, oppressive town founded by Mennonites on the cold, flat plains of Manitoba, Canada.

This moving, darkly funny novel is the world according to Nomi Nickel, a bewildered and wry sixteen-year-old trapped in a town governed by fundamentalist religion. In Nomi's droll, refreshing voice, we're told the story of her eccentric, touching family as it falls apart, each member on a collision course with the only community they have ever known. A work of fierce humor and tragedy by a writer poised to take the American market by storm, this searing, tender, comic testament to family love will break your heart.

Review:

"A 16-year-old rebels against the conventions of her strict Mennonite community and tries to come to terms with the collapse of her family in this insightful, irreverent coming-of-age novel. In bleak rural Manitoba, Nomi longs for her older sister, Tash ('she was so earmarked for damnation it wasn't even funny'), and mother, Trudie, each of whom has recently fled fundamentalist Christianity and their town. Her gentle, uncommunicative father, Ray, isn't much of a sounding board as Nomi plunges into bittersweet memory and grapples with teenage life in a 'kind of a cult with pretend connections to some normal earthly conventions.' Once a 'curious, hopeful child' Nomi now relies on biting humor as her life spins out of control — she stops attending school, shaves her head and wanders around in a marijuana-induced haze — while Ray sells off most of their furniture, escapes on all-night drives and increasingly withdraws into himself. Still, she and Ray are linked in a tender, if fragile, partnership as each slips into despair. Though the narration occasionally unravels into distracting stream of consciousness, the unsentimental prose and the poignant character interactions sustain reader interest. Bold, tender and intelligent, this is a clear-eyed exploration of belief and belonging, and the irresistible urge to escape both. Agent, Knopf Canada. Author tour. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Miriam Toews has written a novel shot through with aching sadness, the spectre of loss, and unexpected humor....It might seem an odd metaphor to use about someone who has authored such a vivid, anguished indictment of religious fundamentalism, but Miriam Toews writes like an angel." David Rakoff, author of Fraud

Review:

"Toews recreates the stultifying world of an exasperated Mennonite teenager in a small town where nothing happens with mesmerizing authenticity." Toronto Star

Review:

"The narrative voice is so strong, it could carry the least eventful, least weird adolescence in the world and still be as transfixing.... Toews' novel is a wonderfully acute, moving, warm, sceptical, frustrated portrait of fundamentalist religion....The book is fascinating, and resonant, and inexorable..." The Guardian (UK)

Review:

"A Complicated Kindness is a delight from beginning to end. The humour might be of the blackest sort ('People here just can't wait to die, it seems. It's the main event.'), but the cumulative effect is liberating and defiantly joyful." Daily Mail

Review:

"Wise, edgy, unforgettable, the heroine of Miriam Toews' knockout novel is Canada?s next classic." The Globe and Mail

Review:

"A Complicated Kindness is affecting, impeccably written, and has real authority, but most of all it is immediate. You — as they say — are there...like waking up in a crazy Bible camp, or witnessing an adolescent tour guide tear off her uniform and make a break for the highway. Quill & Quire

Review:

"A Complicated Kindness struck me like a blow to the solar plexus. Toews, somewhat like Mordecai Richler, makes you feel the pain of her protagonist while elucidating the predicament of her people, always mixing a large dose of empathy with her iconoclastic sense of the ridiculous." Pat Donnelly, The Gazette (Montreal)

Review:

"In a novel full of original characters...Toews has created a feisty but appealing young heroine....As an indictment against religious fundamentalism, A Complicated Kindness is timely. As a commentary on character it is fresh and inventive, and as storytelling it is first rate." The London Free Press

Synopsis:

This landmark literary novel balances unbearable sadness and beauty in the voice of a witty, beleaguered teenager whose family is destroyed by fundamentalist Christianity.

About the Author

Miriam Toews is the author of two novels: Summer of My Amazing Luck (nominated for the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal and winner of the John Hirsch Award) and A Boy of Good Breeding (winner of the McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award) and one work of non-fiction: Swing Low: A Life (winner of the McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award and the Alexander Kennedy Isbister Award for Non-Fiction). She has written for CBC, This American Life (NPR), Saturday Night, Geist, Canadian Geographic, Open Letters and The New York Times Magazine, and has won the National Magazine Award Gold Medal for Humour. Miriam Toews lives in Winnipeg.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Denise Barnett, May 25, 2009 (view all comments by Denise Barnett)
Like a female Holden Caulfield, the 17-year old Mennonite (or meno's, as she calls them) and narrator, Nomi, is dead-pan funny. Like "The Catcher in the Rye", this book is darkly humorous but most effectively bitterseet - in a way that makes the reader want to take Nomi in and give her the family life back that she so desperately wants.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(8 of 16 readers found this comment helpful)
Sporkafied, June 3, 2007 (view all comments by Sporkafied)
I thought the book was darkly funny, but also at times heartbreakingly sad. Some portions were a tad unclear and the book also lagged at times, but you don't have to wait very long for it to pick up again. Overall, it wasn't at all what I expected but still a decent read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(18 of 40 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781582433219
Author:
Toews, Miriam
Publisher:
Counterpoint LLC
Subject:
General
Subject:
Fathers and daughters
Subject:
Teenage girls
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20040931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.38x5.78x.94 in. .88 lbs.

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

A Complicated Kindness New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$21.50 Backorder
Product details 256 pages Counterpoint Press - English 9781582433219 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Sharp and often howlingly funny — but insistently generous — A Complicated Kindness introduces sixteen-year-old Nomi Nickel, straining under the pressure of family, boys, and authority, common enough conflicts drawn here in extravagant, heartrending detail.

"Staff Pick" by ,

This is simply the funniest, sweetest, coolest book of 2004. If you like Canadian Mennonites, you'll love A Complicated Kindness.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A 16-year-old rebels against the conventions of her strict Mennonite community and tries to come to terms with the collapse of her family in this insightful, irreverent coming-of-age novel. In bleak rural Manitoba, Nomi longs for her older sister, Tash ('she was so earmarked for damnation it wasn't even funny'), and mother, Trudie, each of whom has recently fled fundamentalist Christianity and their town. Her gentle, uncommunicative father, Ray, isn't much of a sounding board as Nomi plunges into bittersweet memory and grapples with teenage life in a 'kind of a cult with pretend connections to some normal earthly conventions.' Once a 'curious, hopeful child' Nomi now relies on biting humor as her life spins out of control — she stops attending school, shaves her head and wanders around in a marijuana-induced haze — while Ray sells off most of their furniture, escapes on all-night drives and increasingly withdraws into himself. Still, she and Ray are linked in a tender, if fragile, partnership as each slips into despair. Though the narration occasionally unravels into distracting stream of consciousness, the unsentimental prose and the poignant character interactions sustain reader interest. Bold, tender and intelligent, this is a clear-eyed exploration of belief and belonging, and the irresistible urge to escape both. Agent, Knopf Canada. Author tour. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Miriam Toews has written a novel shot through with aching sadness, the spectre of loss, and unexpected humor....It might seem an odd metaphor to use about someone who has authored such a vivid, anguished indictment of religious fundamentalism, but Miriam Toews writes like an angel."
"Review" by , "Toews recreates the stultifying world of an exasperated Mennonite teenager in a small town where nothing happens with mesmerizing authenticity."
"Review" by , "The narrative voice is so strong, it could carry the least eventful, least weird adolescence in the world and still be as transfixing.... Toews' novel is a wonderfully acute, moving, warm, sceptical, frustrated portrait of fundamentalist religion....The book is fascinating, and resonant, and inexorable..."
"Review" by , "A Complicated Kindness is a delight from beginning to end. The humour might be of the blackest sort ('People here just can't wait to die, it seems. It's the main event.'), but the cumulative effect is liberating and defiantly joyful."
"Review" by , "Wise, edgy, unforgettable, the heroine of Miriam Toews' knockout novel is Canada?s next classic."
"Review" by , "A Complicated Kindness is affecting, impeccably written, and has real authority, but most of all it is immediate. You — as they say — are there...like waking up in a crazy Bible camp, or witnessing an adolescent tour guide tear off her uniform and make a break for the highway.
"Review" by , "A Complicated Kindness struck me like a blow to the solar plexus. Toews, somewhat like Mordecai Richler, makes you feel the pain of her protagonist while elucidating the predicament of her people, always mixing a large dose of empathy with her iconoclastic sense of the ridiculous."
"Review" by , "In a novel full of original characters...Toews has created a feisty but appealing young heroine....As an indictment against religious fundamentalism, A Complicated Kindness is timely. As a commentary on character it is fresh and inventive, and as storytelling it is first rate."
"Synopsis" by , This landmark literary novel balances unbearable sadness and beauty in the voice of a witty, beleaguered teenager whose family is destroyed by fundamentalist Christianity.
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