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Uc Purple Cow--Canceled: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable

Uc Purple Cow--Canceled: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"The only way to get what you're worth is to stand out, to exert emotional labor, to be seen as indispensable, and to produce interactions that organizations and people care deeply about."

In bestsellers such as Purple Cow and Tribes, Seth Godin taught readers how to make remarkable products and spread powerful ideas. But this book is different. It's about you - your choices, your future, and your potential to make a huge difference in whatever field you choose.

There used to be two teams in every workplace: management and labor. Now there's a third team, the linchpins. These people invent, lead (regardless of title), connect others, make things happen, and create order out of chaos. They figure out what to do when there's no rule book. They delight and challenge their customers and peers. They love their work, pour their best selves into it, and turn each day into a kind of art.

Linchpins are the essential building blocks of great organizations. Like the small piece of hardware that keeps a wheel from falling off its axle, they may not be famous but they're indispensable. And in today's world, they get the best jobs and the most freedom.

Have you ever found a shortcut that others missed? Seen a new way to resolve a conflict? Made a connection with someone others couldn't reach? Even once? Then you have what it takes to become indispensable, by overcoming the resistance that holds people back. Linchpin will show you how to join the likes of...

*Keith Johnson, who scours flea markets across the country to fill Anthropologie stores with unique pieces.

*Marissa Mayer, who keeps Google focused on the things that really matter.

*Jason Zimdars, a graphic designer who got his dream job at 37signals without a résumé.

*David, who works at Dean and Deluca coffeeshop in New York. He sees every customer interaction as a chance to give a gift and is cherished in return.

As Godin writes, "Every day I meet people who have so much to give but have been bullied enough or frightened enough to hold it back. It's time to stop complying with the system and draw your own map. You have brilliance in you, your contribution is essential, and the art you create is precious. Only you can do it, and you must."

Synopsis:

Seth Godinand#8217;s three essential questions for every marketer:

and#147;Whatand#8217;s your story?and#8221;

and#147;Will the people who need to hear this story believe it?and#8221;

and#147;Is it true?and#8221;

and#160;

All marketers tell stories. And if they do it right, we believe them. We believe that wine tastes better in a $20 glass than a $1 glass. We believe that an $80,000 Porsche is vastly superior to a $36,000 Volkswagen thatand#8217;s virtually the same car. We believe that $125 sneakers make our feet feel betterand#151;and look coolerand#151;than a $25 brand. And believing it makes it true.

and#160;

As Seth Godin showed in this controversial book, great marketers donand#8217;t talk about features or even benefits. Instead, they tell a storyand#151;a story we want to believe, whether itand#8217;s factual or not. In a world where most people have an infinite number of choices and no time to make them, every organization is a marketer, and all marketing is about telling stories.

and#160;

Marketers succeed when they tell us a story that fits our worldview, a story that we intuitively embrace and then share with our friends. Think of the Dyson vacuum cleaner, or Fiji water, or the iPod.

and#160;

But beware: If your stories are inauthentic, you cross the line from fib to fraud. Marketers fail when they are selfish and scurrilous, when they abuse the tools of their trade and make the world worse. Thatand#8217;s a lesson learned the hard way by telemarketers, cigarette companies, and sleazy politicians.

and#160;

But for the rest of us, itand#8217;s time to embrace the power of the story. As Godin writes, and#147;Stories make it easier to understand the world. Stories are the only way we know to spread an idea. Marketers didnand#8217;t invent storytelling. They just perfected it.and#8221;

Synopsis:

Seth Godins three essential questions for every marketer:

“Whats your story?”

“Will the people who need to hear this story believe it?”

“Is it true?”

 

All marketers tell stories. And if they do it right, we believe them. We believe that wine tastes better in a $20 glass than a $1 glass. We believe that an $80,000 Porsche is vastly superior to a $36,000 Volkswagen thats virtually the same car. We believe that $125 sneakers make our feet feel better—and look cooler—than a $25 brand. And believing it makes it true.

 

As Seth Godin showed in this controversial book, great marketers dont talk about features or even benefits. Instead, they tell a story—a story we want to believe, whether its factual or not. In a world where most people have an infinite number of choices and no time to make them, every organization is a marketer, and all marketing is about telling stories.

 

Marketers succeed when they tell us a story that fits our worldview, a story that we intuitively embrace and then share with our friends. Think of the Dyson vacuum cleaner, or Fiji water, or the iPod.

 

But beware: If your stories are inauthentic, you cross the line from fib to fraud. Marketers fail when they are selfish and scurrilous, when they abuse the tools of their trade and make the world worse. Thats a lesson learned the hard way by telemarketers, cigarette companies, and sleazy politicians.

 

But for the rest of us, its time to embrace the power of the story. As Godin writes, “Stories make it easier to understand the world. Stories are the only way we know to spread an idea. Marketers didnt invent storytelling. They just perfected it.”

About the Author

Seth Godin is an entrepreneur, a sought-after lecturer, a monthly columnist for Fast Company, and an all-around business gadfly. He’s the bestselling author of Permission Marketing, Unleashing the Ideavirus, The Big Red Fez, Survival Is Not Enough, and Purple Cow.

Table of Contents

Small Is the New Big Warning

New Rules, New Winners

Introduction: You're Smarter Than They Think

AAA Auto Parts

Accountability

Acorns, Infected

Artists Care About The Art

Atkins

Benchmarks = Mediocrity

Billboards That Change

Bluegrass And The Cello Player

Bon Jovi And The Pirates

Branding Is Dead; Long Live Branding

Brand My Car, Brand Me

A Brief History Of Hard Work, Adjusted For Risk

Burgerville

Camp, Mickey Rooney, And Your Marketing Problem

Carly Never Had a Chance

CEO Blogs

Change Junkies

Check This Box

China (All That Tea!)

Christmas Card Spam

Clean Fire Trucks

Cliff Climbing (Please Don't Fall Off)

Cliffsnotes

Clinging To Your Job Title?

Clown, Are You A?

Clueless, We Are All

CMO, The Plight of The

Cogs

Commissions (How To Invest Them)

Competence

Cookies And The Technical Ignorance of Joe Surfer

Cookies (The Other Kind Of Cookie)

Cover, Judging A Book By Its

Criticism

Cuff Links

Cursive Versus Typing

Customer Service, A Modest Proposal For

Daylight Saving Time

Digital Divide, The New

Ding

Disrespect

Do Less

Don't Go To Business School

Doughnuts

Echo Chamber

Egomaniac

Enthusiasts

Fear Of Loss, Desire For Gain

Feedback, How To Get

Feedback, How To Give

Fifty States, Flamethrowers, And Sticky Traditions

Flack, As In PR Flack

Flipping The Funnel

Fluffernutter

Fog City Chocolate

Free Prize

Functionality

The Future Isn't What It Used To Be

Gmail

Grandmothers Understand The Net Now, Even

Grass (No, Not That Kind)

Guillotine Or Rack?

Heinlein

Hershey (No Kisses)

Hotels And The Cheap Fortune Cookie

I Changed My Mind Yesterday

Jetblue

Jobs For Purple Cows

A Job Strategy That Makes You A Loser

Journalists

Justin And Ashley

Later Is Not An Option

Local Max, How To Avoid The

Local Max, How The New Marketing Changes The

McDonald's Cocktail Party

"McJob"

Mail, The Check Is In The

"Maybe," Getting People Not To Say

Maybe-Proofing Your Organization

Measurement Increases Speed

Mediocrity

Minnesota Isn't Akron

Mission

Monopolies And The Death Of Scarcity

Mouse Flavor

Myths

Naming

Naming, The New Rules Of

The Needle, The Vise . . . And The Baby Rattle

Never, Do The

No!

No Such Thing As Side Effects

Only

Open Big

Oprah's Show?, How Much Would You Pay To Be On

Optimism

Opt-In

Ostrich

Oxymorons, Just About

Painfully Simple

Parsley

Permission

Pez And Lithuanian Language Records

Pigeons, Superstitious

Placebo Affect, The

Palne, There Are Two Ways To Catch A

Please Don't Make Me Feel So Stupid

Pledge Week

Podcast, Why I Don't Have A

Poilâne, Remembered

Polka

Progress?

Promotions

Prostitution

Provincetown Helmet Insight

Proximity Effect, The

Purple

Quality

Question, The Wrong

Recipe?, Did You Forget The

Reinforcement

Relax . . . , I Mean, Work On The Difficult

Respect And The Fuller Brush Man

Rifting

Right Thing, Doing The

Ringtones

RSS

Rules, Playing By The

Safe Is Risky

Sales

Salinger Knew Better

Satin Pillow, Visualizing The

Scarcity, There's A Shortage Of

Secrets To Success

Selfish Wifi, Razor Blades and Halloween

Sharp Needle, Big Haystack

Shortcuts

Short Words And The KMart Shoppers

Small Is The Big New

Small Is The New Big!

Socks

Soda (They Even Make Mashed-Potato Flavor)

Souvenirs—Real Compared To What?

Soy Luck Club

Spectrum—Is It Ours Or Theirs?

Stagnation

Start Now—Hurry!

Subscriptions

Talking Rabbit . . . So, A Rabbi, A Priest, And A

Technorati

Television Is The New Normal

They Don't Care, They Don't Have To

Thinking Big

Torchbearers

Tradition!

Trust And Respect, Courage And Leadership

The Two Obvious Secrets Of Every Service Business

Ubiquity

Ugly, The Web Is

USPS's Yellow Jersey

Verbs (Gerunds, Actually)

Video? Do You Act Differently When You're On

Viral?, What Makes An Idea

Waffles Are Always On The Menu

Wake-up Calls, A Wake-up Call About

Walls, Cliffs, And Bricks

Web Designers

What Did You Do During The 2000s?

What Then?

Who's Who?

Who You Know Doesn't Matter

Why (Ask Why?)

Woot.com And The Edge

Words

Working Class

Wrappers

Yak Shaving

You Are Your References

Your Very Own Printing Press

Zebra Cake, Famous

Some E-Books ( In Handy Printed Form)

Acknowledgments

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9781591845584
Subtitle:
Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable
Publisher:
Portfolio Trade
Author:
Godin, Seth
Subject:
Careers
Subject:
Marketing - General
Subject:
Leadership
Subject:
Motivational
Subject:
Business;Marketing
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20130431
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
b/w illustrations throughout
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
7 x 5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

Related Subjects

Business » Marketing

Uc Purple Cow--Canceled: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 224 pages Portfolio - English 9781591845584 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Seth Godinand#8217;s three essential questions for every marketer:

and#147;Whatand#8217;s your story?and#8221;

and#147;Will the people who need to hear this story believe it?and#8221;

and#147;Is it true?and#8221;

and#160;

All marketers tell stories. And if they do it right, we believe them. We believe that wine tastes better in a $20 glass than a $1 glass. We believe that an $80,000 Porsche is vastly superior to a $36,000 Volkswagen thatand#8217;s virtually the same car. We believe that $125 sneakers make our feet feel betterand#151;and look coolerand#151;than a $25 brand. And believing it makes it true.

and#160;

As Seth Godin showed in this controversial book, great marketers donand#8217;t talk about features or even benefits. Instead, they tell a storyand#151;a story we want to believe, whether itand#8217;s factual or not. In a world where most people have an infinite number of choices and no time to make them, every organization is a marketer, and all marketing is about telling stories.

and#160;

Marketers succeed when they tell us a story that fits our worldview, a story that we intuitively embrace and then share with our friends. Think of the Dyson vacuum cleaner, or Fiji water, or the iPod.

and#160;

But beware: If your stories are inauthentic, you cross the line from fib to fraud. Marketers fail when they are selfish and scurrilous, when they abuse the tools of their trade and make the world worse. Thatand#8217;s a lesson learned the hard way by telemarketers, cigarette companies, and sleazy politicians.

and#160;

But for the rest of us, itand#8217;s time to embrace the power of the story. As Godin writes, and#147;Stories make it easier to understand the world. Stories are the only way we know to spread an idea. Marketers didnand#8217;t invent storytelling. They just perfected it.and#8221;

"Synopsis" by ,
Seth Godins three essential questions for every marketer:

“Whats your story?”

“Will the people who need to hear this story believe it?”

“Is it true?”

 

All marketers tell stories. And if they do it right, we believe them. We believe that wine tastes better in a $20 glass than a $1 glass. We believe that an $80,000 Porsche is vastly superior to a $36,000 Volkswagen thats virtually the same car. We believe that $125 sneakers make our feet feel better—and look cooler—than a $25 brand. And believing it makes it true.

 

As Seth Godin showed in this controversial book, great marketers dont talk about features or even benefits. Instead, they tell a story—a story we want to believe, whether its factual or not. In a world where most people have an infinite number of choices and no time to make them, every organization is a marketer, and all marketing is about telling stories.

 

Marketers succeed when they tell us a story that fits our worldview, a story that we intuitively embrace and then share with our friends. Think of the Dyson vacuum cleaner, or Fiji water, or the iPod.

 

But beware: If your stories are inauthentic, you cross the line from fib to fraud. Marketers fail when they are selfish and scurrilous, when they abuse the tools of their trade and make the world worse. Thats a lesson learned the hard way by telemarketers, cigarette companies, and sleazy politicians.

 

But for the rest of us, its time to embrace the power of the story. As Godin writes, “Stories make it easier to understand the world. Stories are the only way we know to spread an idea. Marketers didnt invent storytelling. They just perfected it.”

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