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This title in other editions

The Coffeehouse Investor: How to Build Wealth, Ignore Wall Street, and Get on with Your Life

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The Coffeehouse Investor: How to Build Wealth, Ignore Wall Street, and Get on with Your Life Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

An inspirational, low-stress way to financial security

in 1998, Bill Schultheis wrote a simple investment book for people who felt overwhelmed by the bull market. He had discovered that when you simplify your investment decisions, you end up getting better returns. As a bonus, you gain more time for family, friends, and other pursuits.

A decade later, through good times and bad, this philosophy has been proven to tower above the daily chatter of Wall Street. And the revised and expanded edition of his book is more valuable than ever.

In a conversational style, Schultheis explains why we should stop thinking about cool stocks, hot mutual funds, trends in interest rates, and predictions for the economy. Stop trying to beat the stock market average; just remember three simple principles:

? Don?t put all your eggs in one basket

? There?s no such thing as a free lunch

? Save for a rainy day

The New Coffeehouse Investor will help readers get their finances in shape quickly and painlessly.

Synopsis:

An inspirational, low-stress way to financial security

in 1998, Bill Schultheis wrote a simple investment book for people who felt overwhelmed by the bull market. He had discovered that when you simplify your investment decisions, you end up getting better returns. As a bonus, you gain more time for family, friends, and other pursuits.

A decade later, through good times and bad, this philosophy has been proven to tower above the daily chatter of Wall Street. And the revised and expanded edition of his book is more valuable than ever.

In a conversational style, Schultheis explains why we should stop thinking about cool stocks, hot mutual funds, trends in interest rates, and predictions for the economy. Stop trying to beat the stock market average; just remember three simple principles:

? Don?t put all your eggs in one basket

? There?s no such thing as a free lunch

? Save for a rainy day

The New Coffeehouse Investor will help readers get their finances in shape quickly and painlessly.

Synopsis:

In 1998, after thirteen years of providing investment advice for Smith Barney, Bill Schultheis wrote a simple book for people who felt overwhelmed by the stock market. He had discovered that when you simplify your investment decisions, you end up getting better returns. As a bonus, you gain more time for family, friends, and other pursuits.

The Coffeehouse Investor explains why we should stop thinking about top-rated stocks and mutual funds, shifts in interest rates, and predictions for the economy. Stop trying to beat the stock market average, which few “experts” ever do. Instead, just remember three simple principles: Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. There’s no such thing as a free lunch. And save for a rainy day.

By focusing more on your passions and creativity and less on the daily ups and downs, you will actually build more wealth—and improve the quality of your life at the same time.

About the Author

Bill Schultheis is a partner and fee-only financial advisor with Soundmark Wealth Management and a former broker for Smith Barney. The first editon of The Coffeehouse Investor was published in 1998, and he has lectured and led seminars about it since. He lives in Kirkland, Washington.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781591845843
Author:
Schultheis, Bill
Publisher:
Portfolio
Subject:
Personal Finance - Investing
Subject:
Labor & Industrial Relations
Subject:
Business - Personal Finance
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20130131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.58 x 5.8 x 0.88 in 0.78 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Business » Investing
Business » Personal Finance
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Labor

The Coffeehouse Investor: How to Build Wealth, Ignore Wall Street, and Get on with Your Life New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.00 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Portfolio - English 9781591845843 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
An inspirational, low-stress way to financial security

in 1998, Bill Schultheis wrote a simple investment book for people who felt overwhelmed by the bull market. He had discovered that when you simplify your investment decisions, you end up getting better returns. As a bonus, you gain more time for family, friends, and other pursuits.

A decade later, through good times and bad, this philosophy has been proven to tower above the daily chatter of Wall Street. And the revised and expanded edition of his book is more valuable than ever.

In a conversational style, Schultheis explains why we should stop thinking about cool stocks, hot mutual funds, trends in interest rates, and predictions for the economy. Stop trying to beat the stock market average; just remember three simple principles:

? Don?t put all your eggs in one basket

? There?s no such thing as a free lunch

? Save for a rainy day

The New Coffeehouse Investor will help readers get their finances in shape quickly and painlessly.

"Synopsis" by ,
In 1998, after thirteen years of providing investment advice for Smith Barney, Bill Schultheis wrote a simple book for people who felt overwhelmed by the stock market. He had discovered that when you simplify your investment decisions, you end up getting better returns. As a bonus, you gain more time for family, friends, and other pursuits.

The Coffeehouse Investor explains why we should stop thinking about top-rated stocks and mutual funds, shifts in interest rates, and predictions for the economy. Stop trying to beat the stock market average, which few “experts” ever do. Instead, just remember three simple principles: Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. There’s no such thing as a free lunch. And save for a rainy day.

By focusing more on your passions and creativity and less on the daily ups and downs, you will actually build more wealth—and improve the quality of your life at the same time.

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