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1 Local Warehouse African American Studies- General

This title in other editions

Our Black Year: One Family's Quest to Buy Black in America's Racially Divided Economy

by

Our Black Year: One Family's Quest to Buy Black in America's Racially Divided Economy Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Maggie and John Anderson were successful African American professionals raising two daughters in a tony suburb of Chicago. But they felt uneasy over their good fortune. Most African Americans live in economically starved neighborhoods. Black wealth is about one tenth of white wealth, and black businesses lag behind businesses of all other racial groups in every measure of success. One problem is that black consumers--unlike consumers of other ethnicities-- choose not to support black-owned businesses. At the same time, most of the businesses in their communities are owned by outsiders.

On January 1, 2009 the Andersons embarked on a year-long public pledge to "buy black." They thought that by taking a stand, the black community would be mobilized to exert its economic might. They thought that by exposing the issues, Americans of all races would see that economically empowering black neighborhoods benefits society as a whole. Instead, blacks refused to support their own, and others condemned their experiment. Drawing on economic research and social history as well as her personal story, Maggie Anderson shows why the black economy continues to suffer and issues a call to action to all of us to do our part to reverse this trend.

Review:

"What began as a 90-day project to 'Buy Black' became a year-long project (2009 — 2010) and a foundation promoting black entrepreneurship for a Chicago couple, Maggie and John Anderson. They tried to get through the year patronizing only African-American businesses, 'to document what products and services we could and could not find.' While this book shows them living their lives with social difficulties (what should one do if invited to a friend's party thrown in a white establishment?) and emotional crises (a terminally ill parent, stressed friendships), the primary focus is on their foundation — its history, hard times, and highlights of the 'Empowerment Experiment.' In merging the details of their effort — checking out establishments, getting celebrity endorsements, black business history, and multiple statistics — the book becomes repetitive, overwritten, and more tiresome than its dynamite subject deserves: 'How insane is it that we couldn't find a Black-owned store in all of Chicagoland with a consistent supply of fruits and vegetables?' If Anderson's book gets readers to wrestle with that question, it will have done a good enough job to make what is largely a business history an effective probe into how African-Americans spend so much money that flows so overwhelmingly out of their community." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

An African American family chronicles their year-long commitment to patronizing only black-owned businesses, exposing economic inequality and inspiring a movement

About the Author

As CEO and cofounder of The Empowerment Experiment Foundation, Maggie Anderson has become the leader of a self-help economics movement that supports quality black businesses and urges consumers, especially other middle and upper class African Americans, to proactively and publicly support them. She has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, and CBS Morning News, among many other national television and radio shows. She received her BA from Emory University and her JD and MBA from the University of Chicago. She lives in Oak Park, Illinois, with her husband, John, and their two daughters. Ted Gregory is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the Chicago Tribune.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781610390248
Subtitle:
One Family's Quest to Buy Black in America's Racially Divided Economy
Author:
Anderson, Maggie
Author:
Anderson, Maggie P.
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Subject:
Economics - General
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Edition Description:
First Trade Paper Edition
Publication Date:
20130514
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Illustrations:
none
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects


Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Travel » General

Our Black Year: One Family's Quest to Buy Black in America's Racially Divided Economy Used Hardcover
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$7.95 In Stock
Product details 320 pages PublicAffairs - English 9781610390248 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "What began as a 90-day project to 'Buy Black' became a year-long project (2009 — 2010) and a foundation promoting black entrepreneurship for a Chicago couple, Maggie and John Anderson. They tried to get through the year patronizing only African-American businesses, 'to document what products and services we could and could not find.' While this book shows them living their lives with social difficulties (what should one do if invited to a friend's party thrown in a white establishment?) and emotional crises (a terminally ill parent, stressed friendships), the primary focus is on their foundation — its history, hard times, and highlights of the 'Empowerment Experiment.' In merging the details of their effort — checking out establishments, getting celebrity endorsements, black business history, and multiple statistics — the book becomes repetitive, overwritten, and more tiresome than its dynamite subject deserves: 'How insane is it that we couldn't find a Black-owned store in all of Chicagoland with a consistent supply of fruits and vegetables?' If Anderson's book gets readers to wrestle with that question, it will have done a good enough job to make what is largely a business history an effective probe into how African-Americans spend so much money that flows so overwhelmingly out of their community." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
An African American family chronicles their year-long commitment to patronizing only black-owned businesses, exposing economic inequality and inspiring a movement
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