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ADA's Algorithm: How Lord Byron's Daughter ADA Lovelace Launched the Digital Age

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ADA's Algorithm: How Lord Byron's Daughter ADA Lovelace Launched the Digital Age Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

JAMES ESSINGER is a writer with a particular interest in the history of ideas that have had a practical impact on the modern world. His previous book, Jacquard’s Web: How a Hand-Loom Led to the Birth of the Information Age (2004), was chosen as one of the top 5 popular science books of the year by the Economist.

Review:

"Behind every great man, there's a great woman; no other adage more aptly describes the relationship between Charles Babbage, the man credited with thinking up the concept of the programmable computer, and mathematician Ada Lovelace, whose contributions, according to Essinger (Jacquard's Web) in this absorbing biography, proved indispensable to Babbage's invention. The Analytical Engine was a series of cogwheels, gear-shafts, camshafts, and power transmission rods controlled by a punch-card system based on the Jacquard loom. Lovelace, the only legitimate child of English poet Lord Byron, wrote extensive notes about the machine, including an algorithm to compute a long sequence of Bernoulli numbers, which some observers now consider to be the world's first computer program. Essinger's tome is undergirded by academic research, but it is the author's prose, both graceful and confident, that will draw in a general readership. Readers are treated to an intimate portrait of Lovelace's short but significant life — she died at age 36 from uterine cancer — along with an abbreviated history of 19th-century high-society London. A quick denouement and preface add contemporary context and further Essinger's argument that Lady Lovelace 'had seen the computer age clearly ahead... was never allowed to act on what she saw.' Agent: Diane Banks, Diane Banks Associates, U.K. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

US

Product Details

ISBN:
9781612194080
Author:
Essinger, James
Publisher:
Melville House Publishing
Subject:
Computers Reference-History and Society
Subject:
computer science;computers;lord byron;ada lovelace;computing;steve jobs;alan turing;feminism;charles dickens;history of computers;technology;women in technology;charles babbage;programming;programming history;history of programming;computers history;walte
Subject:
computer science;computers;lord byron;ada lovelace;computing;steve jobs;alan turing;feminism;charles dickens;history of computers;technology;women in technology;charles babbage;programming;programming history;history of programming;computers history;walte
Subject:
Women
Subject:
computer science;computers;lord byron;ada lovelace;computing;steve jobs;alan turing;feminism;charles dickens;history of computers;technology;women in technology;charles babbage;programming;programming history;history of programming;computers history;walte
Subject:
computer science;computers;lord byron;ada lovelace;computing;steve jobs;alan turing;feminism;charles dickens;history of computers;technology;women in technology;charles babbage;programming;programming history;history of programming;computers history;walte
Subject:
computer science;computers;lord byron;ada lovelace;computing;steve jobs;alan turing;feminism;charles dickens;history of computers;technology;women in technology;charles babbage;programming;programming history;history of programming;computers history;walte
Subject:
computer science;computers;lord byron;ada lovelace;computing;steve jobs;alan turing;feminism;charles dickens;history of computers;technology;women in technology;charles babbage;programming;programming history;history of programming;computers history;walte
Publication Date:
20141031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
8.54 x 5.78 x 1.16 in 0.86 lb

Related Subjects

Biography » Women
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » History and Society
History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » General History
History and Social Science » World History » England » General

ADA's Algorithm: How Lord Byron's Daughter ADA Lovelace Launched the Digital Age New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$25.95 Backorder
Product details 272 pages Melville House Publishing - English 9781612194080 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Behind every great man, there's a great woman; no other adage more aptly describes the relationship between Charles Babbage, the man credited with thinking up the concept of the programmable computer, and mathematician Ada Lovelace, whose contributions, according to Essinger (Jacquard's Web) in this absorbing biography, proved indispensable to Babbage's invention. The Analytical Engine was a series of cogwheels, gear-shafts, camshafts, and power transmission rods controlled by a punch-card system based on the Jacquard loom. Lovelace, the only legitimate child of English poet Lord Byron, wrote extensive notes about the machine, including an algorithm to compute a long sequence of Bernoulli numbers, which some observers now consider to be the world's first computer program. Essinger's tome is undergirded by academic research, but it is the author's prose, both graceful and confident, that will draw in a general readership. Readers are treated to an intimate portrait of Lovelace's short but significant life — she died at age 36 from uterine cancer — along with an abbreviated history of 19th-century high-society London. A quick denouement and preface add contemporary context and further Essinger's argument that Lady Lovelace 'had seen the computer age clearly ahead... was never allowed to act on what she saw.' Agent: Diane Banks, Diane Banks Associates, U.K. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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