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Burning the Midnight Oil: Illuminating Words for the Long Night's Journey Into Day

by

Burning the Midnight Oil: Illuminating Words for the Long Night's Journey Into Day Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In Burning the Midnight Oil, word-wrangler extraordinaire Phil Cousineau has gathered an eclectic and electric collection of soulful poems and prose from great thinkers throughout the ages. Whether beguiling readers with glorious poetry or consoling them with prayers from fellow restless souls, Cousineau can relieve any insomniac's unease. From St. John of the Cross to Annie Dillard, Beethoven to The Song of Songs, this refreshingly insightful anthology soothes and inspires all who struggle through the dark of the night. These "night thoughts" vividly illustrate Alfred North Whitehead's liberating description of "what we do without solitude" and also evoke Henry David Thoreau's reverie, "Our truest life is when we are in dreams awake." These poetic ponderances sing of the falling darkness, revel in dream-time, convey the ache of melancholy, conspire against sleeplessness, vanquish loneliness, contemplate the night sky, rhapsodize on love, and languorously greet the first rays of dawn. Notable night owls include Rabandranath Tagore, Mary Oliver, Manley Hopkins, Jorge Borges and William Blake.

Winner of the Independent Publisher Award Gold Medal in Inspirational/Spiritual

Synopsis:

Be transported! In Burning the Midnight Oil,Wordwrangler extraordinaire Phil Cousineau has gathered an eclectic and electric collection of soulful poems and prose from great thinkers through the ages. Whether beguiling readers with glorious poetry or consoling them with prayers from fellow restless souls, Cousineau can relieve any insomniac's unease. From St. John of the Cross to Annie Dillard, Beethoven to The Song of Songs, this refreshingly insightful anthology will soothe and inspire all who struggle through the dark of the night.

These "night thoughts" vividly illustrate Alfred North Whitehead's liberating description of "what we do with out solitude" and also evoke Henry David Thoreau's reverie,"Our truest life is when we are in dreams awake." The nightwriters in Cousineau's vesperal collection range from saints, poets, and shamans as well as astronomers, naturalists, and tells of ancient tales along with shining passages from the our most brilliant (albeit insomniac) writers of today. These poetic ponderances sing of the falling darkness, revel in dreamtime, convey the ache of melancholy, conspire against sleeplessness, vanquish loneliness, contemplate the night sky, rhapsodize on love, and langorously greet the first rays of dawn.

Notable night owls include Rabandranath Tagore, Mary Oliver, Manley Hopkins, Jorge Borges, William Blake, Antler, James Agee, Erin Byrne, Galileo Galilee, Georgia Hesse, Miles Davis, Beryl Markham, Nikos Kazantzakis, Li Po, Mahatma Gandhi, Bruce Chatwin, Linda McFerrin, Theodore Roethke, Leonardo da Vinci, Sharon Olds, Thomas de Quincey, Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Lindbergh, and many more.

From the book:

So out of the vast night descends a "precarious" power over our souls that inspires us to ask our most vital questions and challenges us to look within and seek without. For night is the time, as Pawnee Indians sing, when "visions travel better." The hour Benedictine monks believe the world needs prayers more than ever. The moment Buddhist monks experience the lowest flame of Kundalini. The dark night of the soul. The dark wall. The midpoint of our nightly soul journey. The black ink from God's pen.

When we're sitting quietly with the great mysteries, doing nothing, the soul deepens, prayers happen all by themselves. Some of the words that emerge out of those meditations are meant to rouse us, others to send us into sweet slumber. Which are which?

Listening to these night voices, we become alert to a world rapidly disappearing under the artificial light of the modern world. Despite our predatory fears, the night is long and full of marvels. By the light of its dark secrets we can make our own way through the shadowworld to the fire at the source of all mystery.

Synopsis:

A Creativity Companion for Writers, Artists and Anyone Needing a Jolt of Inspiration

What mysteries might the night hold for you? Join Pico Iyer for his rapturous “Night Walk in Manila.” Listen with Flannery OConnor, to her strange and compelling “The Night Cry of the Peacock.” Look through John Muirs eyes at the unforgettable beauty of “Glaciers by Starlight.” Burning the Midnight Oil is an eclectic and electric collection of soulful poems and prose from great thinkers through the ages. As author and curator Phil Cousineau explains in the introduction to his nocturne, “There is a light that we can find only in the dark...that brings about new thoughts and ideas.”

About the Author

Phil Cousineau is an award-winning writer and filmmaker, teacher and editor, independent scholar and travel leader, storyteller and TV host. His fascination with art, literature, and the history of culture has taken him from Michigan to Marrakesh, Iceland to the Amazon, in a worldwide search for what the ancients called "the soul of the world." The author of 26 nonfiction books, he's a freelance writer, filmmaker, and an expert on film and mythology. He lives in San Francisco.

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

Prologue: The Darkness that Heals

Part I: The Twilight Zone

Introduction

But I Sleep Alone, Sappho

Fireflies, Rabandranath Tagore

Acquainted with the Night: Robert Frost

We Grow Accustomed to the Dark, Emily Dickinson

Snowy Night, Mary Oliver

Afterwards, Thomas Hardy

The Times Are Nightfall, Gerard Manley Hopkins

Baruch Spinoza: Jorge Borges,

Blue Mosque Reverie, Phil Cousineau

A Hymn to the Night, Novalis

Each Breath of Light, Annie Dillard

Songs of Owl Women

The Last Prince of Thormond, P. J. Curtis

Last Night in Santorini, Edward Tick

The Tiger, William Blake

Mother Nursing Milky Way: Antler

Among the Sounds of the Night: James Agee

Take That Ride, R. B. Morris

Sunset on the Serengeti, Huston Smith

Coltrane Twilight, Erin Byrne

A Little Night Music, Linda Watanabee McFerrin

You Have Opened a Secret Tonight, Mevlana Rumi

Love at the Edge of the Grand Canyon, Jane Winslow Eliot

Their 50th Anniversary, James Botsford

The Story of King Shadyrar and Sheherazada, Richard Burton

Part II: Nighthawks

Introduction

Night Song, Sappho, Willis Barnstone

A Letter from Galileo, Galileo Galilee

A Page from Galileos Journals, Galileo Galilee

Alone with the Stars, Rachel Carson

Glaciers by Starlight, John Muir

Alone in the Arctic Night, Richard E. Byrd

A Night in an Igloo, Georgia Hesse

Edward Hopper: The Nighthawk, Alexander Eliot

Café de Nuit, Erin Byrne

The Domain of Night: The Darkroom: Stuart Balcomb

Light and Shadow, Joanne Warfield

Dead Air / Night Radio, Richard Beban

Night Gigs in Motown, Chris Bakhridge

Miles of Country Roads, Miles Davis

Amsterdam, R. B. Morris

West with the Night, Beryl Markham

Zorbas Fire, Nikos Kazantzakis

Night Train, Georgia Hesse

Drinking Alone by Moonlight: Li Po

Night Game, William Haney

Pitch Dark, Phil Cousineau

Hares at Play, John Clare

The Cry of the Peacock, Flannery OConnor

Every Evening I Stroll, Eugene Delacroix

Walking Walden, Henry David Thoreau

Wandering at Night, Walt Whitman

San Francisco Nights, James Norwood Pratt

Elastic Midnight, MIkkel Aaland

Now as the Ancient Night, R. B. Morris

The Night I Drove Kerouac Home: Phil Cousineau

Walking Manila, Pico Iyer

I Walk the City at Night, Mevlana Rumi

The Library at Night, Alberto Manguel

Part III: A Hard Days Night

Introduction

Curfew: A European Folk Tale

Insomnia, Abu ibn al-Hammarah

All Night I Could Not Sleep: Zi Ye

Winter Night: Yang-ti

Night is Forever:Zi Ye

Untouched by Sleep: Ovid

The Seems: Samuel Coleridge

The Fore-Shift, Matthew Tate

I Can See in the Midst of Darkness: Mahatma Gandhi

The Origins of Our Fear of the Dark: Bruce Chatwin

Silent Night in No Mans Land: Stanley Weintraub

Nhac Sanh, Dr. Edward Tick

In My Own House I am a Stranger at Midnight, Fr. Gary Young

The Dangers of Reading All Night, Phil Cousineau [or to intro]

Noche de Los Muertos: Linda McFerrin

Advancing on the Dark: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Trade Noctem: Kent Chadwick

The Pains of Sleep: Samuel Coleridge

In a Dark Time: Theodore Roethke

Do Not Go Gentle Into the Dark Night: Dylan Thomas

He Watched Her While She Slept: James Joyce

Lying Awake, May Sarton

A Victim of Insomnia, Loren Eisley

Greek epitaphs, Michael Wolfe

Drunk at My Fathers Grave, Phil Cousineau

The Night Will Pass: Mevlana Rumi

IV: The Dream Factory

Introduction

I Fell Asleep, Ono no Komachi

Night Song, Sappho

Chanzu Tzus Dream, translated by Sat Hon and Alicia Fox

A Dream of Mountaineering, Po-Chui

Let Not Sleep Come Upon Thine Eyes, Pythagoras

Thoughts for Bed, Epicurus

The Benefits of the Dark, Leonardo da Vinci

Golden Slumbers, Thomas Dekker

Those Who Do Not Feel This Love, Mevlana Rumi

Windows and Doors, Phil Cousineau

The Midnight Guest, Anacreon

Sonnet XXVII, William Shakespeare

Looking at my Children Asleep, Sharon Olds

Kants Critique of Pure Sleeping, Thomas de Quincey

A Dream Within a Dream, Edgar Allan Poe

The Land of Nod, Robert Louis Stevenson

The Sentinel in Love, Farid ud-Din Attar

Postcard from the New Delhi Night, James Botsford

Sonnet 43, William Shakespeare

The Vision to Elektra, Robert Herrick

Last Night, Proserpius

Dreaming of Kubla Khan, Samuel Coleridge

Dreaming While I Drive, R. B. Morris

A Renaissance Remedy for Sleep, Marsilio Ficino

Before Turning Out the Lights, Brother David Steindl-Rast

The Mystery of Jet Lag, Pico Iyer

Part IV: Morning Has Broken

Introduction

Dawn, Sappho

End of the Party, Sappho

An Greeting to the Day, Orpingalik

It Gave Me the Daring, Lalla

To Tan Chiu, Li Po

In the Axe-Time, An Ancient Viking Tale

The Night at Zensho-ji Temple, Basho

Was I Changed by the Night? Lewis Carroll

Wake! Omar Khayyam

The Throat of Dawn, Mark Nepo

My Immortal Beloved, Ludwig von Beethoven

Speak to Us of Beauty, Kahil Gibran

Waking in the Monastery, Fr. Gary Young

Each Soul Must Meet the Morning Sun, Ohiyesa

Zero in the Dark, Verlyn Klinkenborg

The Night View of the World, Howard Thurman

I Have Been Tricked, Mevlana Rumi

Delta Dawn, Dr. Edward Tick

The Spirit of St. Louis in the Coming Dawn, Charles Lindbergh

Lying Single in Bed, Samuel Pepys

Our Lives Are Rounded by Sleep, William Shakespeare

The Old City Before Dawn, Pico Iyer

The Blind Watchmaker, Phil Cousineau

Product Details

ISBN:
9781936740734
Author:
Cousineau, Phil
Publisher:
Viva Editions
Author:
Cousineau, Phil
Author:
Dowd, Jeff "The Dude"
Subject:
Anthologies (multiple authors)
Subject:
Quotations
Subject:
Anthologies-General
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20131231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
244
Dimensions:
7 x 5 in

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Burning the Midnight Oil: Illuminating Words for the Long Night's Journey Into Day New Hardcover
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Product details 244 pages Viva Editions - English 9781936740734 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Be transported! In Burning the Midnight Oil,Wordwrangler extraordinaire Phil Cousineau has gathered an eclectic and electric collection of soulful poems and prose from great thinkers through the ages. Whether beguiling readers with glorious poetry or consoling them with prayers from fellow restless souls, Cousineau can relieve any insomniac's unease. From St. John of the Cross to Annie Dillard, Beethoven to The Song of Songs, this refreshingly insightful anthology will soothe and inspire all who struggle through the dark of the night.

These "night thoughts" vividly illustrate Alfred North Whitehead's liberating description of "what we do with out solitude" and also evoke Henry David Thoreau's reverie,"Our truest life is when we are in dreams awake." The nightwriters in Cousineau's vesperal collection range from saints, poets, and shamans as well as astronomers, naturalists, and tells of ancient tales along with shining passages from the our most brilliant (albeit insomniac) writers of today. These poetic ponderances sing of the falling darkness, revel in dreamtime, convey the ache of melancholy, conspire against sleeplessness, vanquish loneliness, contemplate the night sky, rhapsodize on love, and langorously greet the first rays of dawn.

Notable night owls include Rabandranath Tagore, Mary Oliver, Manley Hopkins, Jorge Borges, William Blake, Antler, James Agee, Erin Byrne, Galileo Galilee, Georgia Hesse, Miles Davis, Beryl Markham, Nikos Kazantzakis, Li Po, Mahatma Gandhi, Bruce Chatwin, Linda McFerrin, Theodore Roethke, Leonardo da Vinci, Sharon Olds, Thomas de Quincey, Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Lindbergh, and many more.

From the book:

So out of the vast night descends a "precarious" power over our souls that inspires us to ask our most vital questions and challenges us to look within and seek without. For night is the time, as Pawnee Indians sing, when "visions travel better." The hour Benedictine monks believe the world needs prayers more than ever. The moment Buddhist monks experience the lowest flame of Kundalini. The dark night of the soul. The dark wall. The midpoint of our nightly soul journey. The black ink from God's pen.

When we're sitting quietly with the great mysteries, doing nothing, the soul deepens, prayers happen all by themselves. Some of the words that emerge out of those meditations are meant to rouse us, others to send us into sweet slumber. Which are which?

Listening to these night voices, we become alert to a world rapidly disappearing under the artificial light of the modern world. Despite our predatory fears, the night is long and full of marvels. By the light of its dark secrets we can make our own way through the shadowworld to the fire at the source of all mystery.

"Synopsis" by ,
A Creativity Companion for Writers, Artists and Anyone Needing a Jolt of Inspiration

What mysteries might the night hold for you? Join Pico Iyer for his rapturous “Night Walk in Manila.” Listen with Flannery OConnor, to her strange and compelling “The Night Cry of the Peacock.” Look through John Muirs eyes at the unforgettable beauty of “Glaciers by Starlight.” Burning the Midnight Oil is an eclectic and electric collection of soulful poems and prose from great thinkers through the ages. As author and curator Phil Cousineau explains in the introduction to his nocturne, “There is a light that we can find only in the dark...that brings about new thoughts and ideas.”

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