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1 Burnside Biology- Genetics

Nature via Nurture: Genes, Experience, and What Makes Us Human

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Nature via Nurture: Genes, Experience, and What Makes Us Human Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

From Powells.com:

"Thinkers will find lots of grist for the mill here. Much more than a book about genetics, Nature Via Nurture is about how life works, why people are so complex, and how unproductive it is to view the world in terms of A vs. B. This would make a good book club selection, since there are so many discussion points throughout. Ridley's book most certainly won?t settle the debate, which will probably continue for centuries. However, it provides a thoughtful path for resolving the apparent rift." Doug Brown, Powells.com (read the entire Powells.com review)

Publisher Comments:

Chapter One The Paragon of Animals Is man no more than this? Consider him well: Thou owest the worm no silk, the beast no hide, the sheep no wool, the cat no perfume: — Ha! here's three of us are sophisticated! — Thou art the thing itself: unaccommodated man is no more but such a poor, bare, forked animal as thou art. "King Lear

Similarity is the shadow of difference. Two things are similar by virtue of their difference from another; or different by virtue of one's similarity to a third. So it is with individuals. A short man is different from a tall man, but two men seem similar if contrasted with a woman. So it is with species. A man and a woman may be very different, but by comparison with a chimpanzee, it is their similarities that strike the eye — the hairless skin, the upright stance, the prominent nose. A chimpanzee, in turn, is similar to a human being when contrasted with a dog: the face, the hands, the 32 teeth, and so on. And a dog is like a person to the extent that both are unlike a fish. Difference is the shadow of similarity.

Consider, then, the feelings of a naive young man, as he stepped ashore in Tierra del Fuego on 18 December 1832 for his first encounter with what we would now call hunter-gatherers, or what he would call "man in a state of nature." Better still, let him tell us the story: It was without exception the most curious & interesting spectacle I ever beheld. I would not have believed how entire the difference between savage & civilized man is. It is much greater than between a wild & domesticated animal, in as much as in man there is greater power of improvement ... I believe if the world was searched, no lower grade of man could be found.

Theeffect on Charles Darwin was all the more shocking because these were not the first Fuegian natives he had seen. He had shared a ship with three who had been transported to Britain, dressed in frocks and coats, and taken to meet the king. To Darwin they were just as human as any other person. Yet here were their relatives, suddenly seeming so much less human. They reminded him of ... well, of animals. A month later, on finding the campsite of a single Fuegian limpet hunter in an even more remote spot, he wrote in his diary: "We found the place where he had slept — it positively afforded no more protection than the form of a hare. How very little are the habits of such a being superior to those of an animal." Suddenly, Darwin is writing not just about difference (between civilized and savage man) but about similarity — the affinity between such a man and an animal. The Fuegian is so different from the Cambridge graduate that he begins to seem similar to an animal.

Six years after his encounter with the Fuegian natives, in the spring of 1838, Darwin visited London zoo and there for the first time saw a great ape. It was an orangutan named Jenny, and she was the second ape to be brought to the zoo. Her predecessor, Tommy, a chimpanzee, had been exhibited at the zoo for a few months in 1835 before he died of tuberculosis. Jenny was acquired by the zoo in 1837, and like Tommy she caused a small sensation in London society. She seemed such a human animal, or was it such a beastly person? Apes suggested uncomfortable questions about the distinction between people and animals, between reason and instinct. Jenny featured on the cover of the "Penny Magazine of the Society for the Diffusionof Useful Knowledge; an editorial reassured readers that "extraordinary as the Orang may be compared with its fellows of the brute creation, still in nothing does it trench upon the moral or mental provinces of man." Queen Victoria, who saw a different orangutan at the zoo in 1842, begged to differ. She described it as "frightful and painfully and disagreeably human."

After his first encounter with Jenny in 1838, Darwin returned to the zoo twice more a few months later. He came armed with a mouth organ, some peppermint, and a sprig of verbena. Jenny seemed to appreciate all three. She seemed "astonished beyond measure" at her reflection in a mirror. He wrote in his notebook: "Let man visit Ouranoutang in domestication ... see its intelligence ... and then let him boast of his proud preeminence ... Man in his arrogance thinks himself a great work, worthy the interposition of a deity. More humble and I believe true to consider him created from animals." Darwin was applying to animals what he had been taught to apply to geology: the uniformitarian principle that the forces shaping the landscape today are the same as those that shaped the distant past. Later that September, while reading Malthus's essay on population, he had his sudden insight into what we now know as natural selection.

Jenny had played her part. When she took the mouth organ from him and placed it to her lips, she had helped him realize how high above the brute some animals could rise, just as the Fuegians had made him realize how low beneath civilization some humans could sink. Was there a gap at all?

He was not the first person to think this way. Indeed, a Scottish judge, Lord Monboddo, had speculated in the1790s that orangutans could speak — if educated. Jean-Jacques Rousseau was only one of several Enlightenment philosophers who wondered if apes were not continuous with "savages." But it was Darwin who changed the way human beings think of their own nature. Within his lifetime, he saw educated opinion come to accept that human bodies were those of just another ape modified by descent from a common ancestor.

But Darwin had less success in persuading his fellow human beings that the same argument could apply to the mind ...

Review:

"Terrific popular science." Booklist, starred review

Review:

"Ridley's survey of what is known about nature-nurture interactions is encyclopedic and conveyed with insight and style....fans of his earlier book and readers looking for a challenging read will find this an engrossing study of what makes us who we are." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"[O]n the gene side, much variety, and on the nurture side, contexts galore, creating circles of complexity and feedback that render cause-effect statements (à la determinism) moot....Certainly not the last word, but a lot of interesting turns of phrase and provocative findings to enrich the all-absorbing study of genes and behavior." Kirkus Reviews

Book News Annotation:

Freelance science writer Matt Ridley recounts the hundred years' debate over nature versus nurture, suggesting that it might best be replaced by a new image of nature and nurture working in tandem. He argues that genes are designed to take their cues from nurture, and that nurture is also dependent on genetic makeup. Academic but accessible to the general reader. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [283]-306) and index.

Synopsis:

Armed with extraordinary new discoveries about genes, acclaimed science writer Matt Ridley turns his attention to the nature versus nurture debate to bring readers a stunning book about the roots of human behavior.

About the Author

Matt Ridley's books have been shortlisted for six literary awards, including the Los Angeles Times Book Prize (for Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters). His most recent book, The Agile Gene: How Nature Turns on Nurture, won the award for the best science book published in 2003 from the National Academies of Science. He has been a scientist, a journalist, and a national newspaper columnist, and is the chairman of the International Centre for Life, in Newcastle, England. Matt Ridley is also a visiting professor at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060006785
Subtitle:
Genes, Experience, and What Makes Us Human
Author:
Ridley, Matt
Publisher:
Harper
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Physiological Psychology
Subject:
Anthropology - Physical
Subject:
Human genetics
Subject:
Nature and nurture
Subject:
Behavior genetics
Subject:
Life Sciences - Genetics & Genomics
Subject:
Anthropology - General
Subject:
General science
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series Volume:
4a
Publication Date:
20030429
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1.09 in 20.8 oz

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Related Subjects

Science and Mathematics » Biology » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Genetics
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Genetics

Nature via Nurture: Genes, Experience, and What Makes Us Human Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages HarperCollins Publishers - English 9780060006785 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Terrific popular science."
"Review" by , "Ridley's survey of what is known about nature-nurture interactions is encyclopedic and conveyed with insight and style....fans of his earlier book and readers looking for a challenging read will find this an engrossing study of what makes us who we are."
"Review" by , "[O]n the gene side, much variety, and on the nurture side, contexts galore, creating circles of complexity and feedback that render cause-effect statements (à la determinism) moot....Certainly not the last word, but a lot of interesting turns of phrase and provocative findings to enrich the all-absorbing study of genes and behavior."
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. [283]-306) and index.
"Synopsis" by , Armed with extraordinary new discoveries about genes, acclaimed science writer Matt Ridley turns his attention to the nature versus nurture debate to bring readers a stunning book about the roots of human behavior.

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