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The Poisonwood Bible (Oprah's Book Club)

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The Poisonwood Bible (Oprah's Book Club) Cover

ISBN13: 9780060175405
ISBN10: 0060175400
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Staff Pick

In The Poisonwood Bible, a Baptist missionary takes his family to the Belgian Congo in the late '50s, endangering the lives of his wife and four daughters. Alternating between the voices of the mother and daughters, Kingsolver successfully paints the emotional depth of their predicament and the insanity of the father and his deranged beliefs.
Recommended by Adrienne, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

From Powells.com:

Very rarely does a novel have as significant an impact as has The Poisonwood Bible. Though it has received a great deal of critical recognition – it was, after all, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize – what has really distinguished Kingsolver's masterpiece from other books of recent years (besides the much-coveted Oprah seal of approval) is the tremendous effect it has had on readers. Not only did it remain on national bestsellers lists for over two years, it was also the recipient of a number of reader's choice awards, including the 2000 Booksense Book of the Year, which is based on the votes of booksellers from around the country. And a little closer to home, The Poisonwood Bible has received two Powell's Puddly Awards. For two years running, when asked "What was the best book you read last year," more Powell's customers have answered The Poisonwood Bible than any other novel.

In The Poisonwood Bible Kingsolver ventures intrepidly out of her familiar Southwest setting to create a story of calamitous undoing in the Belgian Congo of 1959. The daughters and wife of controlling, abusive evangelist Nathan Price recount alternating versions of the events that take place after their family arrives in the jungle, and how each of the female family members passes the thirty years following. They are so naive about what is required to survive in this alien world they actually bring cake mixes with them. From the beginning, Nathan's obsession with "converting the natives" to Christianity is met with open hostility (a logical reaction to his insistence on baptism in crocodile-infested waters) and makes both him and his essentially captive family the mortal enemies of a local witch doctor. The Prices' ill-fated interactions with the community are entwined with the larger political upheaval pervading the country (i.e., independence from brutal Belgian rule, the assassination of the country's first autonomous leader and subsequent CIA-aided, UN-sanctioned rule by the ruthless Mobutu), providing a thorough, thought-provoking, and indicting look into the ruin wrought in Africa at the hands of its colonizers. Lilus, Powells.com

See also our Poisonwood Bible Further Recommendations page.

Publisher Comments:

Plot Summary
God's Kingdom in its pure, unenlightened glory. So fourteen-year-old Leah Price expects when, in the summer of 1959, she arrives in the Congo with her family. Her Baptist-preacher father, Reverend Nathan Price, assigned to Kilanga mission, is determined to enlighten the savages and to rule his family with strict biblical sanction. Leah's twin, Adah, the victim of hemiplegia at birth, limps along and maintains silence. Fifteen-year-old Rachel resents being dropped on " this dread dark shore" far from America's fashions and comforts. Ruth May, five years old, faints. And their mother, Orleanna, readies herself to protect them all from whatever perils may come--from jungle, river, or father and his terrible God. From 1959 through 1998, the Price sisters tell their stories, in alternating narratives that reflect their ages as the years pass and the understandings that they achieve. Those stories--together with Orleanna's retrospective commentaries--reveal the amazing forty-year saga that the Prices and the Congo share. Cultural and spiritual conflicts, confusion and revelation, hunger and pleasure, cruelties and kindness, suffering and love, all combine with the day-to-day life in Africa's villages to enrich this wondrous tale. This is Barbara Kingsolver's most daring, complex, and rewarding novel--a whopping good story told with tender majesty. The wisdom that Rachel, Adah, Leah, Ruth May, and Orleanna wrest from their lives is also ours.

Topics for Discussion:
1. What are the implications of the novel's title phrase, the poisonwood bible, particularly in connection with the main characters' lives and the novel's main themes? How important are thecircumstances in which the phrase comes into being?

2. How does Kingsolver differentiate among the Price sisters, particularly in terms of their voices? What does each sister reveal about herself and the other three, their relationships, their mother and father, and their lives in Africa? What is the effect of our learning about events and people through the sisters' eyes?

3. What is the significance of the Kikongo word nommo and its attendant concepts of being and naming? Are there Christian parallels to the constellation of meanings and beliefs attached to nommo? How do the Price daughters' Christian names and their acquired Kikongo names reflect their personalities and behavior?

4. The sisters refer repeatedly to balance (and, by implication, imbalance). What kinds of balance--including historical, political, and social--emerge as important? Are individual characters associated with specific kinds of balance or imbalance? Do any of the sisters have a final say on the importance of balance?

5. What do we learn about cultural, social, religious, and other differences between Africa and America? To what degree do Orleanna and her daughters come to an understanding of those differences? Do you agree with what you take to be Kingsolver's message concerning such differences?

6. Why do you suppose that Reverend Nathan Price is not given a voice of his own? Do we learn from his wife and daughters enough information to formulate an adequate explanation for his beliefs and behavior? Does such an explanation matter?

7. What differences and similarities are there among Nathan Price's relationship with his family, Tata Ndu's relationship with his people, and the relationship ofthe Belgian and American authorities with the Congo? Are the novel's political details--both imagined and historical--appropriate?

8. How does Kingsolver present the double themes of captivity and freedom and of love and betrayal? What kinds of captivity and freedom does she explore? What kinds of love and betrayal? What are the causes and consequences of each kind of captivity, freedom, love, and betrayal?

9. At Bikoki Station, in 1965, Leah reflects, " I still know what justice is." Does she? What concept of justice does each member of the Price family and other characters (Anatole, for example) hold? Do you have a sense, by the novel's end, that any true justice has occurred?

10. In Book Six, Adah proclaims, " This is the story I believe in . . ." What is that story? Do Rachel and Leah also have stories in which they believe? How would you characterize the philosophies of life at which Adah, Leah, and Rachel arrive? What story do you believe in?

11. At the novel's end, the carved-animal woman in the African market is sure that " There has never been any village on the road past Bulungu, " that " There is no such village" as Kilanga. What do you make of this?
About the Author: Barbara Kingsolver was born on April 8, 1955. She grew up "in the middle of an alfalfa field," in the part of eastern Kentucky that lies between the opulent horse farms and the impoverished coal fields. While her family has deep roots in the region, she never imagined staying there herself. "The options were limited--grow up to be a farmer or a farmer's wife."

Kingsolver has always been a storyteller: "I used to beg my mother to let me tell her a bedtimestory." As a child, she wrote stories and essays and, beginning at the age of eight, kept a journal religiously. Still, it never occurred to Kingsolver that she could become a professional writer. Growing up in a rural place, where work centered mainly on survival, writing didn't seem to be a practical career choice. Besides, the writers she read, she once explained, "were mostly old, dead men. It was inconceivable that I might grow up to be one of those myself . . ."

Kingsolver left Kentucky to attend DePauw University in Indiana, where she majored in biology. She also took one creative writing course, and became active in the last anti-Vietnam War protests. After graduating in 1977, Kingsolver lived and worked in widely scattered places. In the early eighties, she pursued graduate studies in biology and ecology at the University of Arizona in Tucson, where she received a Masters of Science degree. She also enrolled in a writing class taught by author Francine Prose, whose work Kingsolver admires.

Kingsolver's fiction is rich with the language and imagery of her native Kentucky. But when she first left home, she says, "I lost my accent . . . P eople made terrible fun of me for the way I used to talk, so I gave it up slowly and became something else." During her years in school and two years spent living in Greece and France she supported herself in a variety of jobs: as an archaeologist, copy editor, X-ray technician, housecleaner, biological researcher and translator of medical documents. After graduate school, a position as a science writer for the University of Arizona soon led her into feature writing for journals and newspapers. Her numerous articles have appeared in avariety of publications, including "The Nation," "The New York Times," and "Smithsonian," and many of them are included in the collection, "High Tide in Tucson: Essays from Now or Never." In 1986 she won an Arizona Press Club award for outstanding feature writing, and in 1995, after the publication of "High Tide in Tucson," Kingsolver was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from her alma mater, De Pauw University.

Kingsolver credits her careers in scientific writing and journalism with instilling in her a writer's discipline and broadening her "fictional possiblities." Describing herself as a shy person who would generally prefer to stay at home with her computer, she explai

Review:

"Tragic, and remarkable....A novel that blends outlandish experience with Old Testament rhythms of prophecy and doom." USA Today

Synopsis:

In her first novel since "Pigs in Heaven", Kingsolver offers a compelling exploration of religion, conscience, imperialist arrogance, and the many paths to redemption. An American missionary and his family travel to the Congo in 1959, a time of tremendous political and social upheaval. Web feature.

Synopsis:

The Poisonwood Bible is a story told by the wife and four daughters of Nathan Price, a fierce, evangelical Baptist who takes his family and mission to the Belgian Congo in 1959. They carry with them everything they believe they will need from home, but soon find that all of it—from garden seeds to Scripture—is calamitously transformed on African soil. What follows is a suspenseful epic of one family's tragic undoing and remarkable reconstruction over the course of three decades in postcolonial Africa.

The novel is set against one of the most dramatic political chronicles of the twentieth century: the Congo's fight for independence from Belgium, the murder of its first elected prime minister, the CIA coup to install his replacement, and the insidious progress of a world economic order that robs the fledgling African nation of its autonomy. Against this backdrop, Orleanna Price reconstructs the story of her evangelist husband's part in the Western assault on Africa, a tale indelibly darkened by her own losses and unanswerable questions about her own culpability. Also narrating the story, by turns, are her four daughters—the self-centered, teenaged Rachel; shrewd adolescent twins Leah and Adah; and Ruth May, a prescient five-year-old. These sharply observant girls, who arrive in the Congo with racial preconceptions forged in 1950s Georgia, will be marked in surprisingly different ways by their father's intractable mission, and by Africa itself. Ultimately each must strike her own separate path to salvation. Their passionately intertwined stories become a compelling exploration of moral risk and personal responsibility.

Dancing between the dark comedy of human failings and the breathtaking possibilities of human hope, The Poisonwood Bible possesses all that has distinguished Barbara Kingsolver's previous work, and extends this beloved writer's vision to an entirely new level. Taking its place alongside the classic works of postcolonial literature, this ambitious novel establishes Kingsolver as one of the most thoughtful and daring of modern writers.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 545-546).

About the Author

Barbara Kingsolver's twelve books of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction include the novels The Bean Trees and The Poisonwood Bible. Translated into nineteen languages, her work has won a devoted worldwide readership and many awards, including the National Humanities Medal. Her most recent book is the highly praised, New York Times bestselling Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, published in May 2007. She lives with her family on a farm in southwestern Virginia.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Suzanne Oxford, November 14, 2012 (view all comments by Suzanne Oxford)
This book is a portrait of a missionary family who leave their middle-American home in Bethlehem, Georgia for the dark and fobidding rainforest of deepest Africa. The Price family led by their Hell and brimstone Evangelical minister, Nathan Price, are dragged into a life which they are totally unprepared for, bringing along their Betty Crocker cake mixes, packets of seeds for Big Boy tomatoes and gardening tools. The story is told from 5 different points of view, as we hear from the mother, Orleanna and 4 daughters. This definitely adds a greater dimension of depth to an otherwise beautifully told story. With dramatic imagery, you enter the jungles of Africa and can hear the sounds, feel the heavy humid air on your skin and see the magnificent greenery of the jungle.

I see some reviewers here were not impressed with this book, which I really do not understand. From the beginning, Kingsolver casts a spell on the reader and you are swept up into her world of Africa. She gives authentic characterizations of the land, its people, the conflicts and struggles for survival in day-to-day life in the Congo. I believe this struggle for survival is the main theme of the book and how people are changed by their surroundings. For example, Orleanna has been sheltered most of her life in Mississippi until she marries Nathan. Soon after she finds she has entered a loveless union with a broken man who is not able to show any compassion or even kindness to his wife. After having 4 children, she can only blindly follow his lead, ending up in Africa. Later on Kingsolver shows how events in Africa, including some of the worst possible disasters, make a change in Orleanna. However, with Nathan and Rachel, the oldest daughter, there is little that changes in their basic characters.

I really enjoyed this novel with all the adventure and drama that only Africa could provide. At times it is even humorous with the native men in Africa wearing red trousers with holes in the bottom or when the women danced at the tribal celebration being naked to the waist, much to Nathan Price's chagrin.
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Denise Barnett, July 14, 2010 (view all comments by Denise Barnett)
I can't believe I let this book sit on the shelf for so long. The story of a couple and their four daughters on a mission trip into the Congo is enthralling! You are able to read it through the eyes of each person as they see it happen. Beautifully written with characters that you will not forget. Heart-breaking, exciting, and lovely all at once while this family turns into individuals.
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(4 of 7 readers found this comment helpful)
Libellule, June 27, 2006 (view all comments by Libellule)
As J.D. Salinger wrote, the proof of an excellent book is that, at the end, the reader has the unexplicable urge to call up the writer, to just hang out for a while, like a friend. Thank you for The Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver. I feel like I could call you up. I feel like I know you.
The novel has an unearthly atmosphere, perhaps helped by religious allusions... but the content is unmistakably close to the writer's heart, and that's what makes it feel real.
Since discovering Barbara Kingsolver I've read a few others, and I would also highly recommend Animal Dreams. Their common points: both novels made me sick in the guts, and I had to read them both again.
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(15 of 26 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780060175405
Author:
Kingsolver, Barbara
Publisher:
Harper
Author:
by Barbara Kingsolver
Location:
New York :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Africa
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Family
Subject:
Missionaries
Subject:
Americans
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Congo.
Subject:
Congo (Democratic Republic) History 1960-1997 Fiction.
Subject:
Family -- Congo (Democratic Republic) -- Fiction.
Subject:
Congo (Democratic Republic)
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Oprah's Book Club (Hardcover)
Series Volume:
1422-3F
Publication Date:
19981007
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
560
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.97 in 16.99 oz

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Poisonwood Bible (Oprah's Book Club) Used Hardcover
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$4.95 In Stock
Product details 560 pages HarperCollins Publishers - English 9780060175405 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

In The Poisonwood Bible, a Baptist missionary takes his family to the Belgian Congo in the late '50s, endangering the lives of his wife and four daughters. Alternating between the voices of the mother and daughters, Kingsolver successfully paints the emotional depth of their predicament and the insanity of the father and his deranged beliefs.

"Review" by , "Tragic, and remarkable....A novel that blends outlandish experience with Old Testament rhythms of prophecy and doom."
"Synopsis" by , In her first novel since "Pigs in Heaven", Kingsolver offers a compelling exploration of religion, conscience, imperialist arrogance, and the many paths to redemption. An American missionary and his family travel to the Congo in 1959, a time of tremendous political and social upheaval. Web feature.

"Synopsis" by , The Poisonwood Bible is a story told by the wife and four daughters of Nathan Price, a fierce, evangelical Baptist who takes his family and mission to the Belgian Congo in 1959. They carry with them everything they believe they will need from home, but soon find that all of it—from garden seeds to Scripture—is calamitously transformed on African soil. What follows is a suspenseful epic of one family's tragic undoing and remarkable reconstruction over the course of three decades in postcolonial Africa.

The novel is set against one of the most dramatic political chronicles of the twentieth century: the Congo's fight for independence from Belgium, the murder of its first elected prime minister, the CIA coup to install his replacement, and the insidious progress of a world economic order that robs the fledgling African nation of its autonomy. Against this backdrop, Orleanna Price reconstructs the story of her evangelist husband's part in the Western assault on Africa, a tale indelibly darkened by her own losses and unanswerable questions about her own culpability. Also narrating the story, by turns, are her four daughters—the self-centered, teenaged Rachel; shrewd adolescent twins Leah and Adah; and Ruth May, a prescient five-year-old. These sharply observant girls, who arrive in the Congo with racial preconceptions forged in 1950s Georgia, will be marked in surprisingly different ways by their father's intractable mission, and by Africa itself. Ultimately each must strike her own separate path to salvation. Their passionately intertwined stories become a compelling exploration of moral risk and personal responsibility.

Dancing between the dark comedy of human failings and the breathtaking possibilities of human hope, The Poisonwood Bible possesses all that has distinguished Barbara Kingsolver's previous work, and extends this beloved writer's vision to an entirely new level. Taking its place alongside the classic works of postcolonial literature, this ambitious novel establishes Kingsolver as one of the most thoughtful and daring of modern writers.

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