The Good, the Bad, and the Hungry Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


The Powell's Playlist | June 18, 2014

Daniel H. Wilson: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Daniel H. Wilson



Like many writers, I'm constantly haunting coffee shops with a laptop out and my headphones on. I listen to a lot of music while I write, and songs... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$3.95
Used Mass Market
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Military- Vietnam War
1 Burnside Military- Vietnam War

We Were Soldiers Once...and Young: IA Drang--The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam

by

We Were Soldiers Once...and Young: IA Drang--The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter OneHeat Of BattleYou cannot choose your battlefield,
God does that for you;
But you can plant a standard
Where a standard never flew.
                    — Stephen Crane, "The Colors"The small bloody hole in the ground that was Captain Bob Edwards's Charlie Company command post was crowded with men. Sergeant Hermon R. Hostuttler, twenty-five, from Terra Alta, West Virginia, lay crumpled in the red dirt, dead from an AK-47 round through his throat. Specialist 4 Ernest E. Paolone of Chicago, the radio operator, crouched low, bleeding from a shrapnel wound in his left forearm. Sergeant James P. Castleberry, the artillery forward observer, and his radio operator, PFC Ervin L. Brown, Jr., hunkered down beside Paolone. Captain Edwards had a bullet hole in his left shoulder and armpit, and was slumped in a contorted sitting position, unable to move and losing blood. He was holding his radio handset to his ear with his one good arm. A North Vietnamese machine gunner atop a huge termite hill no more than thirty feet away had them all in his sights."We lay there watching bullets kick dirt off the small parapet around the edge of the hole," Edwards recalls. "I didn't know how badly I had been hurt, only that I couldn't stand up, couldn't do very much. The two platoon leaders I had radio contact with, Lieutenant William W. Franklin on my right and Lieutenant James L. Lane on Franklin's right, continued to report receiving fire, but had not been penetrated. I knew that my other two platoons were in bad shape and the enemy had penetrated to within hand-grenade range of my command post."The furious assault by more than fivehundred North Vietnamese regulars had slammed directly into two of Captain Edwards's platoons, a thin line of fifty Cavalry troopers who were all that stood between the enemy and my battalion command post, situated in a clump of trees in Landing Zone X-Ray, la Drang Valley, in the Central Highlands of South Vietnam, early on November 15, 1965.America had drifted slowly but inexorably into war in this far-off place. Until now the dying, on our side at least, had been by ones and twos during the "adviser era" just ended, then by fours and fives as the U.S. Marines took the field earlier this year. Now the dying had begun in earnest, in wholesale lots, here in this eerie forested valley beneath the 2,401-foot-high crest of the Chu Pong massif, which wandered ten miles back into Cambodia. The newly arrived 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) had already interfered with and changed North Vietnamese brigadier general Chu Huy Man's audacious plans to seize the Central Highlands. Now his goal was to draw the Americans into battle — to learn how they fought and teach his men how to kill them.One understrength battalion had the temerity to land by helicopter right in the heart of General Man's base camp, a historic sanctuary so far from any road that neither the French nor the South Vietnamese army had ever risked penetrating it in the preceding twenty years. My battalion, the 450-man 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry of the U.S. Army, had come looking for trouble in the la Drang; we had found all we wanted and more. Two regiments of regulars of the People's Army of Vietnain (PAVW) — more than two thousand men — were resting and regrouping in their sanctuary near here and preparing to resume combatoperations, when we dropped in on them the day before. General Man's commanders reacted with speed and fury, and now we were fighting for our lives.One of Captain Edwards's men, Specialist 4 Arthur Viera, remembers every second of Charlie Company's agony that morning. "The gunfire was very loud. We were getting overrun on the right side. The lieutenant Neil A. Kroger, twenty-four, a native of Oak Park, Illinois came up in the open in all this. I thought that was pretty good. He yelled at me. I got up to hear him. He hollered at me to help cover the left sector."Viera adds, "I ran over to him and by the time I got there he was dead. He had lasted a half-hour. I knelt beside him, took off his dog tags, and put them in my shirt pocket. I went back to firing my M-79 grenade launcher and got shot in my right elbow. The M-79 went flying and I was knocked down and fell back over the lieutenant. I had my .45 and fired it with my left hand. Then I got hit in the neck and the bullet went right through. Now I couldn't talk or make a sound.I got up and tried to take charge, and was shot a third time. That one blew up my right leg and put me down. It went in my leg above the ankle, traveled up, came back out, then went into my groin and ended up in my back, close to my spine. Just then two stick grenades blew up right over me and tore up both my legs. I reached down with my left hand and touched grenade fragments on my left leg and it felt like I had touched a red-hot poker. My hand just sizzled."When Bob Edwards was hit he radioed for his executive officer, Lieutenant John Arrington, a twenty-three-year-old South Carolinian who was over at the battalion command post rounding up supplies, to comeforward and take command of Charlie Company. Edwards says, "Arrington made it to my command post and, after a few moments of talking to me while lying down at the edge of the foxhole, was also hit and wounded. He was worried that he had been hurt pretty bad and told me to be sure and tell his wife that he loved her. I thought: 'Doesn't he know I'm badly wounded, too?' He was hit in the arm and the bullet passed into his chest and grazed a lung. He was in pain, suffering silently. He also caught some shrapnel from an M-79 that the North Vietnamese had apparently captured and were firing into the trees above us"

Review:

"Like any disaster story that horrifies yet fascinates, the book compels the reader to read on — anticipating the cries of the wounded, the courage and ability of the medics, helicopter pilots, and certain commanders, and the bitter struggle against an enemy just yards away." The Christian Science Monitor

Review:

"It is impossible to imagine any significant Vietnam collection's being without this book." Booklist

Synopsis:

A study of the 1965 battle of Ia Drang, in the central highlands of South Vietnam, provides a blow-by-blow account of the battle and the implications of this key confrontation. The basis of a major motion picture directed by Randall Wallace and starring Mel Gibson.

Synopsis:

In November 1965, some 450 men of the 1st Battalion, 7th cavalry, under the command of Lt. Col. Hal Moore, were dropped into a small clearing in the la Drang Valley. They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers. Three days later, only two and a half miles away, a sister battalion was chopped to pieces. Together, these events constituted one of the most savage and significant battles of the Vietnam War. Told by the commander of the battalion and the only journalist on the ground through the fighting, this is the devastating, yet inspiring, story of those soldiers who sacrificed themselves for their comrades and never gave up.

About the Author

Harold G. Moore was born in Kentucky and is a West Point graduate, a master parachutist, and an Army aviator. He commanded two infantry companies in the Korean War and was a battalion and brigade commander in Vietnam. He retired from the Army in 1977 with thirty-two years' service and then was executive vice president of a Colorado ski resort for four years before founding a computer software company. An avid outdoorsman, Moore and his wife, Julie, divide their time between homes in Auburn, Alabama, and Crested Butte, Colorado.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060506988
Subtitle:
Ia Drang--The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam
Author:
Moore, Harold G.
Author:
Moore, Harold G.
Author:
Galloway, Joseph L.
Publisher:
HarperTorch
Location:
New York, NY
Subject:
Military - General
Subject:
Military - Vietnam War
Subject:
Vietnamese conflict, 1961-1975
Subject:
Ia Drang Valley (Vietnam), Battle of, 1965.
Subject:
Vietnamese Conflict, 19
Subject:
Ia Drang Valley, Battle of, Vietnam, 19
Subject:
General History
Series Volume:
C 2 KBR/01-10
Publication Date:
20020205
Binding:
Mass Market Paperbou
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
560
Dimensions:
6.76x4.20x1.28 in. .66 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Band of Brothers
    Used Trade Paper $3.95
  2. The Long Gray Line: The American... Used Trade Paper $5.95
  3. Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the... Used Mass Market $1.95
  4. Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War Used Mass Market $2.95
  5. Flyboys: A True Story of Courage... New Hardcover $42.75
  6. Band of Brothers: E Company, 506th... Used Trade Paper $4.95

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Military » General
History and Social Science » Military » Sale Books
History and Social Science » Military » Vietnam War
History and Social Science » US History » General

We Were Soldiers Once...and Young: IA Drang--The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam Used Mass Market
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.95 In Stock
Product details 560 pages Harpertorch - English 9780060506988 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Like any disaster story that horrifies yet fascinates, the book compels the reader to read on — anticipating the cries of the wounded, the courage and ability of the medics, helicopter pilots, and certain commanders, and the bitter struggle against an enemy just yards away."
"Review" by , "It is impossible to imagine any significant Vietnam collection's being without this book."
"Synopsis" by , A study of the 1965 battle of Ia Drang, in the central highlands of South Vietnam, provides a blow-by-blow account of the battle and the implications of this key confrontation. The basis of a major motion picture directed by Randall Wallace and starring Mel Gibson.
"Synopsis" by ,

In November 1965, some 450 men of the 1st Battalion, 7th cavalry, under the command of Lt. Col. Hal Moore, were dropped into a small clearing in the la Drang Valley. They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers. Three days later, only two and a half miles away, a sister battalion was chopped to pieces. Together, these events constituted one of the most savage and significant battles of the Vietnam War. Told by the commander of the battalion and the only journalist on the ground through the fighting, this is the devastating, yet inspiring, story of those soldiers who sacrificed themselves for their comrades and never gave up.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.