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Head Case: How I Almost Lost My Mind Trying to Understand My Brain

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Head Case: How I Almost Lost My Mind Trying to Understand My Brain Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Infiltrating the world of neuroscience, Dennis Cass offers up his own brain to "research," subjecting his mind and body to electric shocks, mind-numbing attention experiments, cigarettes, stress tests of his own devising, and the comedy of Bill Maher. Like a slightly off-kilter George Plimpton, Cass, in his daring exploits, reveals the intricacies of fear, attention, stress, reward, and consciousness from the inside out. Along the way, he weaves in the story of his stepfather's manic depression and drug addiction, in addition to his own problems — which are many. Cass attacks the subject of the human brain with wit and candor, turning popular science into something distinctly human. Head Case is an imperative read for anyone who has ever wondered, Why am I who I am?

Review:

"When writer's block threatened to interfere with Cass's career as a freelance journalist, he decided the solution would be to learn everything he could about how the brain works. He soon fancies himself an amateur scientist, embarking on a spree of experimentation, self-diagnosing himself with attention deficit disorder and scoring a prescription to Adderall, which helps at first but then starts messing up his mind. As Cass makes clear from the outset, the journalistic enterprise is fraught with emotional turbulence because it forces him to confront his family history, especially his stepfather's manic depression. Yet for all the outward appearances of candor — Cass, a former columnist for GQ and Slate, speaks freely of humiliating childhood experiences as well as of his adult jealousy of more successful writers like Malcolm Gladwell — it still feels like he's holding back. The science elements of the book are also insufficiently developed, especially when writers like Steven Johnson and Daniel Pink have already effectively staked out the genre of first-person guided tours of neuroscience. At times, Cass comes off as genuinely uncomfortable with what his research tells him about his brain and himself, leaving readers wishing he'd pushed harder to get a richer story." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Despite the intelligence and easy wit of Cass's prose, it is all somehow a bit dismal, and he ultimately expresses regret for the effort that produced his earnest, honest testimony." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

Infiltrating the world of neuroscience, Dennis Cass offers up his own brain to research, subjecting his mind and body to electric shocks, mind-numbing attention experiments, cigarettes, stress tests of his own devising, and the comedy of Bill Maher. Like a slightly off-kilter George Plimpton, Cass, in his daring exploits, reveals the intricacies of fear, attention, stress, reward, and consciousness from the inside out. Along the way, he weaves in the story of his stepfather's manic depression and drug addiction, in addition to his own problems — which are many. Cass attacks the subject of the human brain with wit and candor, turning popular science into something distinctly human. Head Case is an imperative read for anyone who has ever wondered, Why am I who I am?

Synopsis:

Infiltrating the world of neuroscience, Cass becomes a human guinea pig on a darkly comic journey to understand the human brain and find out what makes us who we are.

About the Author

Dennis Cass has been a freelance journalist for ten years, writing for such publications as Harper's Magazine, the New York Times, and Mother Jones. He has also appeared on NPR's This American Life and has been a columnist for Inside.com, GQ, and the online journal Slate. He lives in Minneapolis with his wife, Liz, and their son, Owen.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060594725
Subtitle:
How I Almost Lost My Mind Trying to Understand My Brain
Author:
Cass, Dennis
Author:
by Dennis Cass
Author:
Wayte, Annie
Publisher:
Harper
Subject:
Neuropsychology
Subject:
Physiological Psychology
Subject:
Neuroscience
Subject:
Brain
Subject:
Life Sciences - Human Anatomy & Physiology
Subject:
Evolutionary psychology
Subject:
General science
Subject:
Seasonal
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
March 2007
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.92 in 13.33 oz

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Cognitive Science
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General

Head Case: How I Almost Lost My Mind Trying to Understand My Brain Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages HarperCollins Publishers - English 9780060594725 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "When writer's block threatened to interfere with Cass's career as a freelance journalist, he decided the solution would be to learn everything he could about how the brain works. He soon fancies himself an amateur scientist, embarking on a spree of experimentation, self-diagnosing himself with attention deficit disorder and scoring a prescription to Adderall, which helps at first but then starts messing up his mind. As Cass makes clear from the outset, the journalistic enterprise is fraught with emotional turbulence because it forces him to confront his family history, especially his stepfather's manic depression. Yet for all the outward appearances of candor — Cass, a former columnist for GQ and Slate, speaks freely of humiliating childhood experiences as well as of his adult jealousy of more successful writers like Malcolm Gladwell — it still feels like he's holding back. The science elements of the book are also insufficiently developed, especially when writers like Steven Johnson and Daniel Pink have already effectively staked out the genre of first-person guided tours of neuroscience. At times, Cass comes off as genuinely uncomfortable with what his research tells him about his brain and himself, leaving readers wishing he'd pushed harder to get a richer story." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Despite the intelligence and easy wit of Cass's prose, it is all somehow a bit dismal, and he ultimately expresses regret for the effort that produced his earnest, honest testimony."
"Synopsis" by , Infiltrating the world of neuroscience, Dennis Cass offers up his own brain to research, subjecting his mind and body to electric shocks, mind-numbing attention experiments, cigarettes, stress tests of his own devising, and the comedy of Bill Maher. Like a slightly off-kilter George Plimpton, Cass, in his daring exploits, reveals the intricacies of fear, attention, stress, reward, and consciousness from the inside out. Along the way, he weaves in the story of his stepfather's manic depression and drug addiction, in addition to his own problems — which are many. Cass attacks the subject of the human brain with wit and candor, turning popular science into something distinctly human. Head Case is an imperative read for anyone who has ever wondered, Why am I who I am?
"Synopsis" by , Infiltrating the world of neuroscience, Cass becomes a human guinea pig on a darkly comic journey to understand the human brain and find out what makes us who we are.
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