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The Believers (P.S.)

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The Believers (P.S.) Cover

ISBN13: 9780061430213
ISBN10: 0061430218
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $6.50!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“Bakopoulos has invented a man for all rainy seasons—a horny, heartbroken cousin of Richard Ford’s Frank Bascombe.” —Tom Piazza

“A winning distraction, a smart entertainment.” —New York Times Book Review

A clairvoyant when it comes to the Starbucks orders, a renegade when it comes to bureaucracy, Zeke asks almost everybody he meets, “Why are you so unhappy?” The answers he receives—a mix of true sadness and absurd complaint—become the core of an obsessive project, “The Inventory of American Unhappiness,” a project that becomes all the more personally meaningful as he follows steps outlined in a women’s magazine on finding the perfect mate. Incisively tapping the voice of one of the most charming—and deluded—narrators to come along in years, Dean Bakopolous captures our zeitgeist with lacerating wit and a big heart, confirming Jonathan Miles’s (author of Dear American Airlines) claim that “there’s no such thing as unhappiness when you’re holding a Dean Bakopolous novel.”

“Hilarious and heartfelt . . . This funny-sad novel seems to take elements of the author’s own life . . . and twists them in a funhouse mirror—with delightful results.” —NPR

Synopsis:

A witty and emotionally raw novel from the award-winning Dean Bakopoulos that introduces Zeke, a scholar looking for love—and a second chance at life.

Synopsis:

“[Zoe Heller] is an extraordinarily entertaining writer, and this novel showcases her copious gifts, including a scathing, Waugh-like wit.”—New York Times

Best-selling author Zoe Heller has followed up the critical and commercial success of What Was She Thinking? Notes on a Scandal with another tour-de-force on the meaning of faith, belief, and trust: The Believers. Tragic and comic, witty and intense, The Believers is the story of a dysfunctional family forced by tragedy to confront their own personal demons. In the vein of Claire Messud and Zadie Smith, Zoe Heller has written that rare novel that tackles the big ideas without sacrificing page-turning readability.

Synopsis:

When a stroke fells radical New York lawyer Joel Litvinoff, a secret is revealed that forces Audrey, his wife, to reexamine everything she believed about their forty-year marriage. In the meantime Joel's children are struggling with their own dilemmas and doubts. Disillusioned revolutionary Rosa has been drawn into the world of Orthodox Judaism. Karla, a devoted—and married—social worker hoping to adopt a child, is falling in love with the owner of a newspaper stand. Lenny, the ne'er-do-well, faces yet another relapse into heroin addiction. In the course of battling their own demons—and one another—the Litvinoffs must reexamine long-held articles of faith and decide what—if anything—they still believe in.

About the Author

Zoë Heller is the author of Everything You Know and What Was She Thinking? Notes on a Scandal, which was short-listed for the Man Booker Prize and made into an acclaimed film starring Cate Blanchett and Judi Dench. Heller lives in New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

W S Krauss, June 10, 2015 (view all comments by W S Krauss)
Interesting novel about a politically progressive Jewish family in which each member is struggling with some aspect of life. The father and husband, Joel, a very well- known and loved attorney, has just had a stroke. He is in the hospital for almost the entire book. His wife Audrey struggles to get him the best care and keep him alive at all cost. She is an angry, vile woman; it is difficult to have any feelings of sympathy or empathy for her. There are two daughters and a son. Rosa, the youngest, is seeking to learn about and perhaps become an Orthodox Jew. Karla is unhappily obese. She and her husband are trying to adopt a child. She starts an affair with a man she met at work. Lenny, the adopted son, is a drug addict. None of the characters, except the comotose Joel seem to have any convictions. They are vaguely political, such as Rosa's work with disadvantaged girls in Harlem. Yet she really doesn't seem to enjoy the work. Audrey seems to have followed her husband into his work as an attorney, but without any real ambitions of her own. They all rally at the end and there is some resolution. I was not very clear on the underlying theme of the story. The real joy in the book is seeing the two daughters search for meaning in their lives. Their unfolding self-discoveries are really the heart of the novel.
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OneMansView, May 16, 2011 (view all comments by OneMansView)
The downside of “belief” (3.75*s)

Set in NYC around 2002 [though not a 9-11 book], the book is a cautionary, prickly story on the personal and social limitations and costs that can accompany a mindset that is obsessively devoted to political causes. The sudden, total incapacitation of 72-year-old Joel Litvinoff, noted left-wing lawyer, from a stroke lays bare the dysfunction that permeates his family ��" from wife Audrey, two daughters Karla and Rosa, to son Lenny.

Audrey, thirteen years younger than Joel when rescued from a London life of oblivion on a chance meeting forty years prior, and with no political inclinations, became well known in New York’s trendy radical circles for her sharp putdowns and rapier wit as Joel’s counterpart in his various causes. But over time that sharpness hardened into something far less amusing. Her indifference towards her growing daughters is only one marker on her off-putting path that Joel’s coma fully reveals. Audrey by turns is imperious, rude, abrasive, judgmental, condescending, self-centered, overly sensitive, etc. No one is spared her harshness: Joel’s doctors, her friends, and especially her daughters.

Karla, a meek do-gooder with a tendency to gain weight, is constantly subjected to her mother’s withering criticisms. Her marriage to a pretentious, dominating union organizer is mostly an indicator of her low self-esteem. Rosa, cut in the mold of her parents, is contemptuous of modern society, but recently has become disillusioned after a four year stay in the supposedly socialist paradise of Cuba. Abruptly, Rosa, a committed atheist, embarks on a stumbling effort to attain the internal peace that she feels is part of Orthodox Judaism, but constantly has to confront the arbitrary controlling aspects of religion, as well as her mother’s total dismissiveness.

Audrey, though hardly likeable, is somewhat understandable. If not to be viewed as merely an appendage to Joel, perhaps she had to adopt a more attention grabbing stridency. She and her husband’s desires for social perfectionism did not prepare her for the realization that Joel was imperfect in being faithful, undoubtedly a factor in her cynicism. Audrey exhibits far more kindness towards the adopted Lenny, son of an incarcerated radical with a life sentence, putting up with his dissolute, drug-using life. Almost grudgingly, Audrey begins to deal with a life without Joel, including some recognition of her adult children’s needs.

The writing is very sharp, erudite at times, with many insightful observations concerning any number of matters. The characterization of Rosa’s empty-headed roommate is classic. All of the leading characters are exaggerated to some degree, especially Audrey. It is difficult to accept that a woman, who is so well informed on so many subjects, could be so resolutely hostile, oblivious to her impact on others. But the author also aims at other excesses. What could be more absurd than Rosa failing to properly observe light switch protocol in the course of her religious instruction? The story may well be not particularly enjoyable, but it is not without its edifying, interesting aspects.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780061430213
Author:
Heller, Zoe
Publisher:
Harper Perennial
Author:
Bakopoulos, Dean
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
America;the midwest;unhappiness;novel;sadness;love;marriage;family;humor;book cl
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Series:
P.S.
Publication Date:
20100131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
8 x 5.31 x 0.7 in 0.55 lb

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Family Life

The Believers (P.S.) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Harper Perennial - English 9780061430213 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A witty and emotionally raw novel from the award-winning Dean Bakopoulos that introduces Zeke, a scholar looking for love—and a second chance at life.
"Synopsis" by , “[Zoe Heller] is an extraordinarily entertaining writer, and this novel showcases her copious gifts, including a scathing, Waugh-like wit.”—New York Times

Best-selling author Zoe Heller has followed up the critical and commercial success of What Was She Thinking? Notes on a Scandal with another tour-de-force on the meaning of faith, belief, and trust: The Believers. Tragic and comic, witty and intense, The Believers is the story of a dysfunctional family forced by tragedy to confront their own personal demons. In the vein of Claire Messud and Zadie Smith, Zoe Heller has written that rare novel that tackles the big ideas without sacrificing page-turning readability.

"Synopsis" by , When a stroke fells radical New York lawyer Joel Litvinoff, a secret is revealed that forces Audrey, his wife, to reexamine everything she believed about their forty-year marriage. In the meantime Joel's children are struggling with their own dilemmas and doubts. Disillusioned revolutionary Rosa has been drawn into the world of Orthodox Judaism. Karla, a devoted—and married—social worker hoping to adopt a child, is falling in love with the owner of a newspaper stand. Lenny, the ne'er-do-well, faces yet another relapse into heroin addiction. In the course of battling their own demons—and one another—the Litvinoffs must reexamine long-held articles of faith and decide what—if anything—they still believe in.
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