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This title in other editions

A Window Across the River

by

A Window Across the River Cover

ISBN13: 9780156030120
ISBN10: 0156030128
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Isaac and Nora haven't seen each other in five years, yet when Nora phones Isaac late one night, he knows who it is before she's spoken a word. Isaac, a photographer, is relinquishing his artistic career, while Nora, a writer, is seeking to rededicate herself to hers.

Fueled by their rediscovered love, Nora is soon on fire with the best work she's ever done, until she realizes that the story she's writing has turned into a fictionalized portrait of Isaac, exposing his frailties and compromises and sure to be viewed by him as a betrayal. How do we remain faithful to our calling if it estranges us from the people we love? How do we remain in love after we have seen the very worst of our loved ones? Brian Morton explores these issues with the same "astonishingly sensitive appreciation for his characters" (Library Journal) that marks his previous work.

Review:

"Funny, precise and beautifully written...Morton's perceptions of the conflicts within the human heart are keen. I loved this book." Alice Sebold

Review:

"Morton's warm yet analytical prose gives the familiar scenes a fresh, revelatory feel....The modesty of this novel gracefully offsets the delicacy and insight with which Morton writes about the junction of love and art." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Nora and Isaac are wonderfully well drawn, an angular, asymmetrical pair whose love has nothing to do with happy endings." New York Times

Review:

"There are no easy answers, according to this novel, which digs deep to sift out what people are made of. Perhaps it cannot ultimately answer the question of what finally matters in life and love, but at least it does try." Library Journal

Review:

"Morton is particularly skilled at describing the sharp rattle of artistic failure, and at bringing to life the streets and rooms of New York, where the fates of his lonely and desperate characters unfold." New Yorker

Synopsis:

This is the story of Nora and Isaac, once lovers, estranged for five years, and now back in one another's lives. Isaac, a photographer, is dealing with the reality, at 40, that he will probably never be a star artist and is settling down in his comfortable job for a suburban New Jersey newspaper, mentoring students whose future looks brighter than his own. Nora, 9 years younger, has always been his great love, and after a five year hiatus, she's back, still struggling as a writer, still taking care of her aging aunt Billie, still unsure whether or not she can commit to Isaac. The problem is, Nora can't help but write about the people in her life, and although she is kind and sensitive and thoughtful and funny, in her writing she is brutal, and seems unable not to seek out the weakness in her subjects, thereby mortally damaging her relationships. Can this love affair survive the slings and arrows of art?

Synopsis:

"A story at once joyous, funny and bittersweet, told with delicate artistry and an aching regard for human frailty. For some readers, Brian Morton may still be an undiscovered treasure. He won't be for long." --Newsday

Isaac and Nora haven't seen each other in five years, yet when Nora phones Isaac late one night, he knows who it is before she speaks. The two rediscover their love, and Nora, a writer, is soon on fire with the best work she has ever done. Absorbed by her writing, she doesn't realize at first that her story is a fictionalized portrait of Isaac, exposing his frailties and compromises, sure to be viewed by him as a betrayal. The conflict tests the limits of their relationship and raises deeply complex questions about how we remain faithful to our calling if it estranges us from the people we love.

"An absolute pleasure... " — Seattle Times

Brian Morton is the author of The Dylanist and Starting Out in the Evening. He has received an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Koret Jewish Book Award for Fiction, a Guggenheim Foundation Award, and has been a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. Morton lives in New York City.

Synopsis:

Fueled by her rediscovered love for Isaac, a photographer, Nora realizes that the story she's working on has turned into a fictionalized portrait of him, exposing his frailties and compromises and sure to be viewed as a betrayal.

About the Author

Brian Morton is the author of The Dylanist and Starting Out in the Evening. He has received an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Koret Jewish Book Award for Fiction, a Guggenheim Foundation Award, and has been a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. He lives in New York City.

Table of Contents

"A funny, precise and beautifully written novel. I loved this book." --Alice Sebold, author of The Lovely Bones

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Tess2H, May 23, 2007 (view all comments by Tess2H)
What is more romantic but to love someone and they live across a river and you just wish every time you look over; that, just maybe one of the lights you see is theres and maybe they are looking back hoping the same.
I find that hopelessly romantic.
So, in this title, A Window Across the River, it first makes you wonder, "What about a window," but then you put it together with the story and your are amazed by the depth and feeling in it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780156030120
Author:
Morton, Brian
Publisher:
Harvest Books
Subject:
General
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Photographers
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Love stories
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20040931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
300
Dimensions:
8 x 5.31 in 0.6 lb

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

A Window Across the River Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 300 pages Harvest/HBJ Book - English 9780156030120 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Funny, precise and beautifully written...Morton's perceptions of the conflicts within the human heart are keen. I loved this book."
"Review" by , "Morton's warm yet analytical prose gives the familiar scenes a fresh, revelatory feel....The modesty of this novel gracefully offsets the delicacy and insight with which Morton writes about the junction of love and art."
"Review" by , "Nora and Isaac are wonderfully well drawn, an angular, asymmetrical pair whose love has nothing to do with happy endings."
"Review" by , "There are no easy answers, according to this novel, which digs deep to sift out what people are made of. Perhaps it cannot ultimately answer the question of what finally matters in life and love, but at least it does try."
"Review" by , "Morton is particularly skilled at describing the sharp rattle of artistic failure, and at bringing to life the streets and rooms of New York, where the fates of his lonely and desperate characters unfold."
"Synopsis" by ,
This is the story of Nora and Isaac, once lovers, estranged for five years, and now back in one another's lives. Isaac, a photographer, is dealing with the reality, at 40, that he will probably never be a star artist and is settling down in his comfortable job for a suburban New Jersey newspaper, mentoring students whose future looks brighter than his own. Nora, 9 years younger, has always been his great love, and after a five year hiatus, she's back, still struggling as a writer, still taking care of her aging aunt Billie, still unsure whether or not she can commit to Isaac. The problem is, Nora can't help but write about the people in her life, and although she is kind and sensitive and thoughtful and funny, in her writing she is brutal, and seems unable not to seek out the weakness in her subjects, thereby mortally damaging her relationships. Can this love affair survive the slings and arrows of art?

"Synopsis" by ,
"A story at once joyous, funny and bittersweet, told with delicate artistry and an aching regard for human frailty. For some readers, Brian Morton may still be an undiscovered treasure. He won't be for long." --Newsday

Isaac and Nora haven't seen each other in five years, yet when Nora phones Isaac late one night, he knows who it is before she speaks. The two rediscover their love, and Nora, a writer, is soon on fire with the best work she has ever done. Absorbed by her writing, she doesn't realize at first that her story is a fictionalized portrait of Isaac, exposing his frailties and compromises, sure to be viewed by him as a betrayal. The conflict tests the limits of their relationship and raises deeply complex questions about how we remain faithful to our calling if it estranges us from the people we love.

"An absolute pleasure... " — Seattle Times

Brian Morton is the author of The Dylanist and Starting Out in the Evening. He has received an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Koret Jewish Book Award for Fiction, a Guggenheim Foundation Award, and has been a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. Morton lives in New York City.

"Synopsis" by , Fueled by her rediscovered love for Isaac, a photographer, Nora realizes that the story she's working on has turned into a fictionalized portrait of him, exposing his frailties and compromises and sure to be viewed as a betrayal.

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