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This title in other editions

Starbucked: A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce, and Culture

by

Starbucked: A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce, and Culture Cover

ISBN13: 9780316013482
ISBN10: 031601348x
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Starbucked will be the first book to explore the incredible rise of the Starbucks Corporation and the caffeine-crazy culture that fueled its success. Part Fast Food Nation, part Bobos in Paradise, Starbucked combines investigative heft with witty cultural observation in telling the story of how the coffeehouse movement changed our everyday lives, from our evolving neighborhoods and workplaces to the ways we shop, socialize, and self-medicate.

In Starbucked, Taylor Clark provides an objective, meticulously reported look at the volatile issues like gentrification and fair trade that distress activists and coffee zealots alike. Through a cast of characters that includes coffee-wild hippies, business sharks, slackers, Hollywood trendsetters and more, Starbucked explores how America transformed into a nation of coffee gourmets in only a few years, how Starbucks manipulates psyches and social habits to snare loyal customers, and why many of the things we think we know about the coffee commodity chain are false.

Review:

"There's a double shot of skepticism in this account of Starbucks' ascendancy as 'a permanent fixture in the global landscape' written by Clark, a Portland-based journalist, who's been mulling over Starbucks ever since the coffeehouse chain opened three branches in his small Oregon hometown. His coverage begins with a Seattle trio who set out to emulate the high-quality coffee of the California-based Peet's chain, before Howard Schultz took over the company and laid plans for its massive expansion. While Clark grudgingly admires Starbucks' ability to repackage coffee as 'beverage entertainment' for a 'hyperprosperous society in search of emotional soothing,' there's a lot he doesn't like about the company. He's convinced that Starbucks 'diminishes the world's diversity' by ruthlessly outmaneuvering local competition on a global scale, and dubs the baristas' work as 'a textbook McJob.' Even the quality of the coffee, he says, has gone downhill. Though Clark loses some of his focus by trying to rope in so many arguments against Starbucks, overall, his dubious perspective on one of the modern world's most ubiquitous icons is just frothy enough to prove entertaining." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Entertaining, illuminating and reflective are not qualities usually associated with corporate histories. But Taylor Clark, former Willamette Week alt-weekly journalist, Dartmouth College graduate and Portland resident, has written a story about one business that's all of these." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"Clark peppers his prose with gems of quotations and revealing incidents, such as the marketing science behind how Starbucks chooses locations." Booklist

Review:

"An absorbing account bolstered by solid reporting." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

Part "Fast Food Nation," part "Bobos in Paradise," this book provides an objective, meticulously reported story of how the coffeehouse movement changed everyday lives, from evolving neighborhoods and workplaces to the ways people shop, socialize, and self-medicate.

About the Author

Taylor Clark is a graduate of Dartmouth College and a Pacific Northwest native. He is a contributing writer and former staff writer for Portand, Oregon's acclaimed alternative weekly Willamette Week.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

wgberninghausen, March 20, 2010 (view all comments by wgberninghausen)
*Starbucked* provided me with an unusually observant and unbiased description of the Starbucks/latte phenomenon. And I agree, since I'm not willing to spend four bucks for two bit's worth of coffee and some hot milk. But then, I'm not a poser. I did espresso, surprisingly enough, in Clark's own home town of Ashland. This was before Clark was born at the first espresso and pizza coffeehouse on Water Street, across from the Beaver Slide, in 1968. If you don't get the references, you're not alone. Even Ashland is full of folks who don't know Ashland. Clark separates the coffee experience from the commercial leviathan with surgical precision. He and I can appreciate the genius of Starbucks without presuming that it has nothing to do with coffee. And that's his well-stated point. Read the book. It's a solid job.
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(2 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
P.M.O'Leary, December 22, 2007 (view all comments by P.M.O'Leary)
Save your money. Buy five double-tall lattes and you'll
feel like you have spent wisely, instead of buying this
book !
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780316013482
Subtitle:
A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce, and Culture
Author:
Clark, Taylor
Publisher:
Back Bay Books
Subject:
History
Subject:
International business enterprises
Subject:
Industries - General
Subject:
Popular Culture - General
Subject:
Corporate & Business History - Strategies
Subject:
Industries - Hospitality, Travel & Tourism
Subject:
Corporate culture
Subject:
Starbucks Coffee Company.
Subject:
General Business & Economics
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20081110
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9.53x6.33x1.04 in. 1.12 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Business » Business Profiles
Business » General
Business » Management
Business » Writing

Starbucked: A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce, and Culture Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Little Brown and Company - English 9780316013482 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "There's a double shot of skepticism in this account of Starbucks' ascendancy as 'a permanent fixture in the global landscape' written by Clark, a Portland-based journalist, who's been mulling over Starbucks ever since the coffeehouse chain opened three branches in his small Oregon hometown. His coverage begins with a Seattle trio who set out to emulate the high-quality coffee of the California-based Peet's chain, before Howard Schultz took over the company and laid plans for its massive expansion. While Clark grudgingly admires Starbucks' ability to repackage coffee as 'beverage entertainment' for a 'hyperprosperous society in search of emotional soothing,' there's a lot he doesn't like about the company. He's convinced that Starbucks 'diminishes the world's diversity' by ruthlessly outmaneuvering local competition on a global scale, and dubs the baristas' work as 'a textbook McJob.' Even the quality of the coffee, he says, has gone downhill. Though Clark loses some of his focus by trying to rope in so many arguments against Starbucks, overall, his dubious perspective on one of the modern world's most ubiquitous icons is just frothy enough to prove entertaining." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Entertaining, illuminating and reflective are not qualities usually associated with corporate histories. But Taylor Clark, former Willamette Week alt-weekly journalist, Dartmouth College graduate and Portland resident, has written a story about one business that's all of these."
"Review" by , "Clark peppers his prose with gems of quotations and revealing incidents, such as the marketing science behind how Starbucks chooses locations."
"Review" by , "An absorbing account bolstered by solid reporting."
"Synopsis" by , Part "Fast Food Nation," part "Bobos in Paradise," this book provides an objective, meticulously reported story of how the coffeehouse movement changed everyday lives, from evolving neighborhoods and workplaces to the ways people shop, socialize, and self-medicate.
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