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Why Is My Mother Getting a Tattoo?: And Other Questions I Wish I Never Had to Ask

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Why Is My Mother Getting a Tattoo?: And Other Questions I Wish I Never Had to Ask Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Despite her forty years and a successful career as a rock journalist, Jancee Dunn still feels like a teenager, especially around her parents and sisters. Looking around, Dunn realizes that shes not alone in this regression: Her friends, all with successful jobs, marriages, and families of their own, still feel like kids around their moms and dads, too. That gets Dunn to thinking: Do we ever really grow up?

Why Is My Mother Getting a Tattoo? explores this phenomenon-through both Dunns coming to grips with getting older and her folks attempts to turn back the clock. In a series of hilarious and heartwarming essays, Dunn conspires with her sisters to finagle their way into the old family homestead, dissects the whys and wherefores of her parents obsession with newspaper clippings, confronts the seamy side of the JC Penney catalogs she paged through as a kid, and accompanies her sixtysomething mother to a New Jersey tattoo parlor, where Mom is giddy to get a raven inked onto her wrist. And Dunn does it all with humor and insight.

Review:

"Dunn's travails will be instantly recognizable to readers in their late 30s and 40s — a generation that's shifted the family bickering about what to serve at holiday dinners to conference calls and e-mails. Her parents are a bottomless well of comedy, sending her wacky newspaper clippings and grilling her loudly about her inability to go to the bathroom during their vacation. Her circle of friends is equally familiar, like the gay buddy who invites her over for TV-movie parties and can always be counted on to make catty remarks about strangers. Several chapters are filled with transcripts of phone conversations with her best friend, Julie, flitting from topic to topic, comparing the embarrassing songs saved on their iPods and wondering why their parents haven't figured out voice mail isn't like an answering machine ('Hello? Anybody there? Hello, it's Dad'). Dunn's tone is genial, only turning serious briefly near the end when she discusses not having kids — and then inadvertently discovers she's finally pregnant. The seriousness doesn't last long, though, and soon it's back to affectionately mocking her mom's decision to get tattooed — although, as her sisters point out, she's secretly pleased to have something new to write about. (June 23)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

With the trademark humor and lovable spirit that infused her first memoir, But Enough About Me, Jancee Dunn turns to her evolving relationship, as a so-called adult, with her parents and family

In her early forties, Jancee Dunn began to wonder why she still felt like a thirteen-year-old around her family. Talking to her friends, she found the same was true for them--despite successful jobs, marriages, and families of their own. Do we ever really grow up, she wonders? Why is the slow, sticky process of prying ourselves free from our parents and childhoods so difficult?

In her new memoir, Dunn examines the phenomenon, with scenes ranging from a haunted Savannah tour gone wrong to a visit to a tattoo parlor with her sixty-ish mother, who is dying to get a raven inked on her wrist.

Finally, Dunn and her sisters arrange to visit the house where they grew up, a bittersweet but comic experience that answers her questions and puts her at peace with her parents--until the next tattoo parlor visit, at least.

About the Author

Jancee Dunn is the author of the novel Dont You Forget About Me and the memoir But Enough About Me. A former writer at Rolling Stone, she was a correspondent for Good Morning America and an MTV veejay. She has written for The New York Times, GQ, Vogue, O: The Oprah Magazine, and other publications. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband, writer Tom Vanderbilt.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780345501929
Author:
Dunn, Jancee
Publisher:
Villard Books
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Journalists -- United States.
Subject:
Parent and adult child -- United States.
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20090631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
7.94x5.30x.51 in. .36 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Women
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Memoirs
History and Social Science » American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

Why Is My Mother Getting a Tattoo?: And Other Questions I Wish I Never Had to Ask Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Villard Books - English 9780345501929 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Dunn's travails will be instantly recognizable to readers in their late 30s and 40s — a generation that's shifted the family bickering about what to serve at holiday dinners to conference calls and e-mails. Her parents are a bottomless well of comedy, sending her wacky newspaper clippings and grilling her loudly about her inability to go to the bathroom during their vacation. Her circle of friends is equally familiar, like the gay buddy who invites her over for TV-movie parties and can always be counted on to make catty remarks about strangers. Several chapters are filled with transcripts of phone conversations with her best friend, Julie, flitting from topic to topic, comparing the embarrassing songs saved on their iPods and wondering why their parents haven't figured out voice mail isn't like an answering machine ('Hello? Anybody there? Hello, it's Dad'). Dunn's tone is genial, only turning serious briefly near the end when she discusses not having kids — and then inadvertently discovers she's finally pregnant. The seriousness doesn't last long, though, and soon it's back to affectionately mocking her mom's decision to get tattooed — although, as her sisters point out, she's secretly pleased to have something new to write about. (June 23)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , With the trademark humor and lovable spirit that infused her first memoir, But Enough About Me, Jancee Dunn turns to her evolving relationship, as a so-called adult, with her parents and family

In her early forties, Jancee Dunn began to wonder why she still felt like a thirteen-year-old around her family. Talking to her friends, she found the same was true for them--despite successful jobs, marriages, and families of their own. Do we ever really grow up, she wonders? Why is the slow, sticky process of prying ourselves free from our parents and childhoods so difficult?

In her new memoir, Dunn examines the phenomenon, with scenes ranging from a haunted Savannah tour gone wrong to a visit to a tattoo parlor with her sixty-ish mother, who is dying to get a raven inked on her wrist.

Finally, Dunn and her sisters arrange to visit the house where they grew up, a bittersweet but comic experience that answers her questions and puts her at peace with her parents--until the next tattoo parlor visit, at least.

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