Star Wars Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN!

Weekly drawing for $100 credit. Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

More at Powell's


Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lauren Owen: IMG The Other Vampire



It's a wild and thundery night. Inside a ramshackle old manor house, a beautiful young girl lies asleep in bed. At the window, a figure watches... Continue »
  1. $18.90 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Quick

    Lauren Owen 9780812993271

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
3 Burnside Literature- A to Z

More copies of this ISBN

I See You Everywhere

by

I See You Everywhere Cover

ISBN13: 9780375422751
ISBN10: 0375422757
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 3 left in stock at $5.50!

 

Review-A-Day

"[Julia Glass] strings together a series of episodes with alternating points of view that meander along for a while, then trail off into a vapor....The stop-and-start effect of this structure might lead some to regard Glass's book as closer to a set of linked stories than a novel, but to me it reads like the same novel starting over and over again, a wearying process in which Glass's sprightly prose...becomes stifled." Donna Rifkind, The Washington Post Book World (read the entire Washington Post Book World review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From the author of the best-selling Three Junes comes an intimate new work of fiction: a tale of two sisters, together and apart, told in their alternating voices over twenty-five years.

Louisa Jardine is the older one, the conscientious student, precise and careful: the one who yearns for a good marriage, an artistic career, a family. Clem, the archetypal youngest, is the rebel: uncontainable, iconoclastic, committed to her work but not to the men who fall for her daring nature. Louisa resents that the charismatic Clem has always been the favorite; yet as Clem puts it, On the other side of the fence-mine-every expectation you fulfill...puts you one stop closer to that Grand Canyon rim from which you could one day rule the world — or plummet in very grand style.

In this vivid, heartrending story of what we can and cannot do for those we love, the sisters grow closer as they move farther apart. Louis settles in New York while Clem, a wildlife biologist, moves restlessly about until she lands in the Rocky Mountains. Their complex bond, Louisa observes, is like a double helix, two souls coiling around a common axis, joined yet never touching.

Alive with all the sensual detail and riveting characterization that mark Glass's previous work, I See You Everywhere is a piercingly candid story of life and death, companionship and sorrow, and the nature of sisterhood itself.

Review:

"Signature Reviewed by Lydia MilletThe fictional palate of Julia Glass, bestselling author of 2002's Three Junes, is one of dog-breeding women and foxhunts, tony Manhattan galleries and boutiques, European travel and haute-cuisine chefs. In common with Rebecca Wells's Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood franchise, Glass's third novel, I See You Everywhere, has female bonding among the landed gentry, a focus on relationships, and devil-may-care, enigmatically charming women of great romantic allure. Like Three Junes, the novel is a series of vignettes across the years, in this instance from the points of view of two sisters with different personalities. Louisa, the elder, is the steady sister on the lookout for love, while Clem is the younger sister, an adventuring, restless spirit with an unfortunate habit of chewing men up and spitting them out. Their parents, too, resemble those in Three Junes: the mother is obsessed with raising and training expensive dogs on a country estate (this time in Rhode Island instead of Scotland); their father is a good-natured, kindly soul who plays second fiddle to a powerful wife. Louisa, not unlike Glass herself, is an urban woman who inhabits the New York art world and moves from making art (pottery) to writing; Clem, being a wilder sort, has a passion for wild animals and moves around the remoter reaches of the continent as an itinerant biologist to do contract work with charismatic fauna ranging from seals to grizzly bears. It's not entirely clear how the sisters relate to each other's livelihoods; Clem seems largely uninterested in art, whereas Louisa alternates between lavishly praising her sister's work to save animals as heroic and referring to polar bears, in 2005, as 'like Al Gore... suddenly all the alarmist rage.' City and country mouse have a wary, competitive, sometimes antagonistic relationship grounded in affection; they occasionally steal each other's boyfriends, but are usually there for each other in times of need, up to and including possible drowning, maiming and cancer. Both cook well, though Louisa is the true gourmet. Clem is better in the sack, at least if we take her word for it: as she says in a letter — reminding us, perhaps inadvertently, of the pia colada song — what she likes most in life are laughter, sex, champagne and sunsets. The sisters do have music in common: though both white, they listen almost exclusively to music by black performers, from Billie Holiday to Bob Marley.I See You Everywhere has a bourgeois, chick lit sensibility, minus the proud vacuousness of the Bushnell set and plus a somewhat unexpected, sad vanishing act by one of the protagonists. It should prove an engaging and intelligent, though not literary, page-turner for sisters who like to revel in sisterhood.Lydia Millet's most recent novel is How the Dead Dream (Counterpoint). " Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Art grows from much more than family drama," muses one of the characters in Julia Glass' first novel, "Three Junes." True enough, yet without family drama there would be no "Three Junes, which won the National Book Award in 2002. Set in Greece, Scotland and New York, and exploring the emotional lives of several generations of a family, "Three Junes" satisfied, for many readers, the itch for an expansive,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"[A] promising extension of Glass's already impressive range." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Glass is a wisely questioning, ardent, and artful novelist." Booklist

Review:

"Rich, intricate and alive with emotion....Glass has used the edges and color blocks of her own life to build an honest portrait of sister-love and sister-hate." New York Times

Review:

"Julia Glass is a writer firmly in control." Dallas Morning News

Review:

"Glass elegantly captures what it means to be an independent and spirited contemporary woman." Chicago Tribune

About the Author

Julia Glass is the author of Three Junes, which won the National Book Award for Fiction, and The Whole World Over. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Her short fiction has won several prizes, including the Tobias Wolff Award and the Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society Medal for the Best Novella. She lives with her family in Massachusetts.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

lesnoces, March 6, 2009 (view all comments by lesnoces)
This book is awful. I can't believe the author wrote something that won the National Book Award. I read about 2/3 of it before I decided to stop punishing myself.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(7 of 15 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375422751
Author:
Glass, Julia
Publisher:
Pantheon
Subject:
Sisters
Subject:
Literary
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20081014
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9.42x6.56x1.11 in. 1.36 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Out Stealing Horses
    Used Trade Paper $3.50
  2. When Will There Be Good News?
    Sale Trade Paper $4.98
  3. The Elegance of the Hedgehog
    Used Trade Paper $5.95
  4. The Sealed Letter Used Trade Paper $7.50
  5. Night Train to Lisbon
    Used Trade Paper $6.95
  6. The Boat Used Trade Paper $7.50

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

I See You Everywhere Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Pantheon Books - English 9780375422751 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Signature Reviewed by Lydia MilletThe fictional palate of Julia Glass, bestselling author of 2002's Three Junes, is one of dog-breeding women and foxhunts, tony Manhattan galleries and boutiques, European travel and haute-cuisine chefs. In common with Rebecca Wells's Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood franchise, Glass's third novel, I See You Everywhere, has female bonding among the landed gentry, a focus on relationships, and devil-may-care, enigmatically charming women of great romantic allure. Like Three Junes, the novel is a series of vignettes across the years, in this instance from the points of view of two sisters with different personalities. Louisa, the elder, is the steady sister on the lookout for love, while Clem is the younger sister, an adventuring, restless spirit with an unfortunate habit of chewing men up and spitting them out. Their parents, too, resemble those in Three Junes: the mother is obsessed with raising and training expensive dogs on a country estate (this time in Rhode Island instead of Scotland); their father is a good-natured, kindly soul who plays second fiddle to a powerful wife. Louisa, not unlike Glass herself, is an urban woman who inhabits the New York art world and moves from making art (pottery) to writing; Clem, being a wilder sort, has a passion for wild animals and moves around the remoter reaches of the continent as an itinerant biologist to do contract work with charismatic fauna ranging from seals to grizzly bears. It's not entirely clear how the sisters relate to each other's livelihoods; Clem seems largely uninterested in art, whereas Louisa alternates between lavishly praising her sister's work to save animals as heroic and referring to polar bears, in 2005, as 'like Al Gore... suddenly all the alarmist rage.' City and country mouse have a wary, competitive, sometimes antagonistic relationship grounded in affection; they occasionally steal each other's boyfriends, but are usually there for each other in times of need, up to and including possible drowning, maiming and cancer. Both cook well, though Louisa is the true gourmet. Clem is better in the sack, at least if we take her word for it: as she says in a letter — reminding us, perhaps inadvertently, of the pia colada song — what she likes most in life are laughter, sex, champagne and sunsets. The sisters do have music in common: though both white, they listen almost exclusively to music by black performers, from Billie Holiday to Bob Marley.I See You Everywhere has a bourgeois, chick lit sensibility, minus the proud vacuousness of the Bushnell set and plus a somewhat unexpected, sad vanishing act by one of the protagonists. It should prove an engaging and intelligent, though not literary, page-turner for sisters who like to revel in sisterhood.Lydia Millet's most recent novel is How the Dead Dream (Counterpoint). " Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "[Julia Glass] strings together a series of episodes with alternating points of view that meander along for a while, then trail off into a vapor....The stop-and-start effect of this structure might lead some to regard Glass's book as closer to a set of linked stories than a novel, but to me it reads like the same novel starting over and over again, a wearying process in which Glass's sprightly prose...becomes stifled." (read the entire Washington Post Book World review)
"Review" by , "[A] promising extension of Glass's already impressive range."
"Review" by , "Glass is a wisely questioning, ardent, and artful novelist."
"Review" by , "Rich, intricate and alive with emotion....Glass has used the edges and color blocks of her own life to build an honest portrait of sister-love and sister-hate."
"Review" by , "Julia Glass is a writer firmly in control."
"Review" by , "Glass elegantly captures what it means to be an independent and spirited contemporary woman."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.