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The Women

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The Women Cover

ISBN13: 9780670020416
ISBN10: 0670020419
Condition: Standard
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Awards

The Rooster 2010 Morning News Tournament of Books Nominee

Staff Pick

The muse is always the last to know. Yet, if she was aware of the artist's failings from the beginning, would that be enough to deter her? That is the question Boyle raises in his novel of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This fictionalized biography is both engaging and ironic. Wright, the media hungry publicity hound, is cast aside while the women take center stage.
Recommended by Christopher, Powells.com

A fictional account of the facts of Frank Lloyd Wright's life, The Women shines. Told mainly through the eyes of his three wives and one mistress, Wright becomes larger than life in his passion for his art, his lust for life, and his need for the women who surround him. Marked by amazing success and tragedy beyond bearing, Wright's story is fascinating, and even though you would rather not, you end up liking him. T. C. Boyle is an incomparable writer, and it is a true treat to read this remarkable novel. I loved it!
Recommended by Dianah, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A dazzling novel of Frank Lloyd Wright, told from the point of view of the women in his life

Having brought to life eccentric cereal king John Harvey Kellogg in The Road to Wellville and sex researcher Alfred Kinsey in The Inner Circle, T.C. Boyle now turns his fictional sights on an even more colorful and outlandish character: Frank Lloyd Wright. Boyle's account of Wright's life, as told through the experiences of the four women who loved him, blazes with his trademark wit and invention. Wright's life was one long howling struggle against the bonds of convention, whether aesthetic, social, moral, or romantic. He never did what was expected and despite the overblown scandals surrounding his amours and very public divorces and the financial disarray that dogged him throughout his career, he never let anything get in the way of his larger-than-life appetites and visions. Wright's triumphs and defeats were always tied to the women he loved: the Montenegrin beauty Olgivanna Milanoff; the passionate Southern belle Maud Miriam Noel; the spirited Mamah Cheney, tragically killed; and his young first wife, Kitty Tobin. In The Women, T.C. Boyle's protean voice captures these very different women and, in doing so, creates a masterful ode to the creative life in all its complexity and grandeur.

Review:

"The genius of Frank Lloyd Wright was both magnetic and cruel, as evidenced by the succession of failed marriages and hot-blooded affairs depicted in this biographic reimagining that drills into Wright mythology and the dark shadows of the American dream. The narrative moves backwards in time through the accounts of four women in Wright's life: Olgivanna, the steely, grounded dancer from Montenegro; Miriam, the drug-addled narcissist from the South; Kitty, the devoted first wife; and Mamah, the beloved and murdered soul mate and intellectual companion. But the novel's centerpiece is Taliesin, Wright's Oz-like Wisconsin home. The tragedies that befall Taliesin — fires, brutality — serve as proxy for Wright's inner turmoil; his deeper stirrings surface only occasionally from behind Boyle's oft-overbearing depiction of Wright's women. The most engaging person is Tadashi Sato, the Japanese-American apprentice and narrator who emerges via his frequent footnotes as a complex reflection of 'Wrieto-san' and, with his inability to remain objective and his evolving view of Wright and Wright's image, becomes the book's most dynamic character. It's a lush, dense and hyperliterate book — in other words, vintage Boyle." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

Move over, Nora Roberts! With this potboiler about the love life of Frank Lloyd Wright, T.C. Boyle, one of America's most inventive writers, bursts feverishly into the realm of romance fiction. "The Women" is an altogether manic, occasionally baffling and yet strangely riveting novel. True readers of the genre, be warned: It's a romance only in spirit. Call it a thinking man's soap opera. As for the... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Wright —and...his greatest creation, Taliesin — is the Rorschach test through which we come to understand each woman and what she sees in this troubled — and troubling — man." Angela O'Donnell, America Magazine

Review:

"All of Boyle's colorful skills are fully engaged..." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Boyle doesn't just fiddle around with familiar biographical material. He inhabits the space of Wright's life and times with particular boldness..." New York Times

Synopsis:

Having brought to life eccentric cereal king John Harvey Kellogg in The Road to Wellville and sex researcher Alfred Kinsey in The Inner Circle, Boyle now turns his fictional sights on an even more colorful and outlandish character: Frank Lloyd Wright.

Synopsis:

The Paris Wife was only the beginning of the story . . .

Paula McLains New York Times–bestselling novel piqued readers interest about Ernest Hemingways romantic life. But Hadley was only one of four women married, in turn, to the legendary writer. Just as T.C. Boyles bestseller The Women completed the picture begun by Nancy Horans Loving Frank, Naomi Woods Mrs. Hemingway tells the story of how it was to love, and be loved by, the most famous and dashing writer of his generation. Hadley, Pauline, Martha and Mary: each Mrs. Hemingway thought their love would last forever; each one was wrong.

Told in four parts and based on real love letters and telegrams, Mrs. Hemingway reveals the explosive love triangles that wrecked each of Hemingway's marriages. Spanning 1920s bohemian Paris through 1960s Cold War America, populated with members of the fabled "Lost Generation," Mrs. Heminway is a riveting tale of passion, love, and heartbreak.

Synopsis:

The Paris Wife was only the beginning of the story . . .

Paula McLains New York Times–bestselling novel piqued readers interest about Ernest Hemingways romantic life. But Hadley was only one of four women married, in turn, to the legendary writer. Just as T.C. Boyles bestseller The Women completed the picture begun by Nancy Horans Loving Frank, Naomi Woods Mrs. Hemingway tells the story of how it was to love, and be loved by, the most famous and dashing writer of his generation. As each wife struggles with his mistress for Ernests heart, and a place in his bed, each marriage slips from tenderness to treachery. Each Mrs. Hemingway thought it would last forever. Each one was wrong.

Told in four parts and populated with members of the fabled “Lost Generation”—including Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, and F. Scott Fitzgerald—Mrs. Hemingway interweaves the love letters, diaries, and telegrams of four very different women into one spellbinding tale.

About the Author

T. Coraghessan Boyle was born and raised in New York's Hudson Valley and now lives near Los Angeles. He is the author of several novels and short story collections. His 1987 novel, World's End, won the PEN/Faulkner Award.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 6 comments:

ToniWeir, January 30, 2013 (view all comments by ToniWeir)
A book so enjoyable that I deliberately slowed my reading pace so that it would last longer. Boyle is a natural storyteller who engages the reader to an extraordinary degree; he is smart, slick, sly, and seems to enjoy himself as much as we enjoy the narrative. If I had a time machine, I would travel back to a time before I discovered "The Women" so that I could experience it all over again.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
jcharlie, January 1, 2010 (view all comments by jcharlie)
Spellbinding spectacular writing and riveting subjects. Fantastic even if you know the ending.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
aunnie, June 15, 2009 (view all comments by aunnie)
T.C. Boyle is true to form in this book which fictionally depicts Frank Lloyd Wright's liaisons with various women. The character of Miriam is awesome. T.C. Boyle paints her to be absolutely wretched, whereas Olgivanna, the Frank's one time mistress puts up with a lot. While the book is fictional, it is an interesting look into the bizarre world of Frank Lloyd Wright.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 6 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670020416
Subtitle:
A Novel
Author:
Boyle, T Coraghessan
Author:
Boyle, T. Coraghessan
Author:
Boyle, T. C.
Author:
Wood, Naomi
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Wright, Frank Lloyd
Subject:
General
Subject:
Relations with women
Subject:
Biographical fiction
Subject:
Wright, Frank Lloyd - Relations with women
Subject:
Historical
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20140527
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
7.75 x 5.06 in 1 lb
Age Level:
17-17

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Related Subjects

» Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Women Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Viking Books - English 9780670020416 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

The muse is always the last to know. Yet, if she was aware of the artist's failings from the beginning, would that be enough to deter her? That is the question Boyle raises in his novel of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This fictionalized biography is both engaging and ironic. Wright, the media hungry publicity hound, is cast aside while the women take center stage.

"Staff Pick" by ,

A fictional account of the facts of Frank Lloyd Wright's life, The Women shines. Told mainly through the eyes of his three wives and one mistress, Wright becomes larger than life in his passion for his art, his lust for life, and his need for the women who surround him. Marked by amazing success and tragedy beyond bearing, Wright's story is fascinating, and even though you would rather not, you end up liking him. T. C. Boyle is an incomparable writer, and it is a true treat to read this remarkable novel. I loved it!

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The genius of Frank Lloyd Wright was both magnetic and cruel, as evidenced by the succession of failed marriages and hot-blooded affairs depicted in this biographic reimagining that drills into Wright mythology and the dark shadows of the American dream. The narrative moves backwards in time through the accounts of four women in Wright's life: Olgivanna, the steely, grounded dancer from Montenegro; Miriam, the drug-addled narcissist from the South; Kitty, the devoted first wife; and Mamah, the beloved and murdered soul mate and intellectual companion. But the novel's centerpiece is Taliesin, Wright's Oz-like Wisconsin home. The tragedies that befall Taliesin — fires, brutality — serve as proxy for Wright's inner turmoil; his deeper stirrings surface only occasionally from behind Boyle's oft-overbearing depiction of Wright's women. The most engaging person is Tadashi Sato, the Japanese-American apprentice and narrator who emerges via his frequent footnotes as a complex reflection of 'Wrieto-san' and, with his inability to remain objective and his evolving view of Wright and Wright's image, becomes the book's most dynamic character. It's a lush, dense and hyperliterate book — in other words, vintage Boyle." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Wright —and...his greatest creation, Taliesin — is the Rorschach test through which we come to understand each woman and what she sees in this troubled — and troubling — man."
"Review" by , "All of Boyle's colorful skills are fully engaged..."
"Review" by , "Boyle doesn't just fiddle around with familiar biographical material. He inhabits the space of Wright's life and times with particular boldness..."
"Synopsis" by , Having brought to life eccentric cereal king John Harvey Kellogg in The Road to Wellville and sex researcher Alfred Kinsey in The Inner Circle, Boyle now turns his fictional sights on an even more colorful and outlandish character: Frank Lloyd Wright.
"Synopsis" by ,
The Paris Wife was only the beginning of the story . . .

Paula McLains New York Times–bestselling novel piqued readers interest about Ernest Hemingways romantic life. But Hadley was only one of four women married, in turn, to the legendary writer. Just as T.C. Boyles bestseller The Women completed the picture begun by Nancy Horans Loving Frank, Naomi Woods Mrs. Hemingway tells the story of how it was to love, and be loved by, the most famous and dashing writer of his generation. Hadley, Pauline, Martha and Mary: each Mrs. Hemingway thought their love would last forever; each one was wrong.

Told in four parts and based on real love letters and telegrams, Mrs. Hemingway reveals the explosive love triangles that wrecked each of Hemingway's marriages. Spanning 1920s bohemian Paris through 1960s Cold War America, populated with members of the fabled "Lost Generation," Mrs. Heminway is a riveting tale of passion, love, and heartbreak.

"Synopsis" by ,
The Paris Wife was only the beginning of the story . . .

Paula McLains New York Times–bestselling novel piqued readers interest about Ernest Hemingways romantic life. But Hadley was only one of four women married, in turn, to the legendary writer. Just as T.C. Boyles bestseller The Women completed the picture begun by Nancy Horans Loving Frank, Naomi Woods Mrs. Hemingway tells the story of how it was to love, and be loved by, the most famous and dashing writer of his generation. As each wife struggles with his mistress for Ernests heart, and a place in his bed, each marriage slips from tenderness to treachery. Each Mrs. Hemingway thought it would last forever. Each one was wrong.

Told in four parts and populated with members of the fabled “Lost Generation”—including Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, and F. Scott Fitzgerald—Mrs. Hemingway interweaves the love letters, diaries, and telegrams of four very different women into one spellbinding tale.

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